BPBquelle16

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1. By Security Council resolution 1456 (2003), the Council designated terrorism as “one of the most serious threats to peace and security.”

2. By resolution 1373 (2001) the Security Council determined that “any act of international terrorism, constitute[s] a threat to international peace and security.”

3. The events of 9/11 – as officially presented – led some politicians to equate terrorism with an existential threat to humankind. US Senator Richard G. Lugar, for example, asserted that Americans were now aware that “the United States is exposed to an existential threat from terrorism”. (U.S.-NATO Missions Annual Conference, Brussels, Belgium, January 19, 2002  NATO’s Role in the War on Terrorism,  By Senator Richard G. Lugar)

4. Canada’s Justice Minister Irwin Cotler, referred to terrorism as „an existential threat to the whole of the human family” in order to justify broadened police powers. (Address by the Honourable Irwin Cotler, Minister of Justice and Attorney-General of Canada, April 28, 2004, Fifth Meeting of Ministers of Justice or of Ministers or Attorney Generals of the Americas)