U.S. and EU Sanctions Are Punishing Ordinary Syrians and Crippling Aid Work, U.N. Report Reveals

Five years of devastating civil war and strict economic sanctions have plunged over 80 percent of Syrians into poverty, up from 28 percent in 2010. Ferdinand Arslanian, a scholar at the Center for Syrian Studies at the University of St. Andrews, says that reduction in living standards and aid dependency is empowering the regime.

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A Peaceful, Silent, Deadly Remedy: The Ethics of Economic Sanctions

Economic sanctions are emerging as one of the major tools of international governance in the post-Cold War era. Sanctions have long been seen as a form of political intervention that does not cause serious human damage, and therefore does not raise pressing ethical questions. However, the nature of sanctions is that they effectively target the most vulnerable and least political sectors of society, and for this reason they must be subject to ethical scrutiny.

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The Rise of German Imperialism and the Phony “Russian Threat”

The ‘Russian Threat’, the ideology driving the US and German offensive throughout Europe and the Caucuses, is a replay of the same doctrine which Hitler used to secure support from domestic industrial bankers, conservatives and right wing overseas collaborators among extremists in Ukraine, Hungary, Rumania and Bulgaria.

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United States’ Foreseeability, Awareness and Knowledge of the Consequences of the Sanctions Against Iraq

United States’ Foreseeability, Awareness and Knowledge of the Consequences of the Sanctions Against Iraq Elias Davidsson 2004 Introduction In order to determine to which extent individual leaders who imposed and maintained economic sanctions against Iraq can be held responsible for the … Continue reading