Category Archives: Opposition in UN General Assembly resolutions

Israel, the US and Uzbekistan oppose lifting Cuba sanctions

The following resolution was adopted by 137 states, with 25 abstaining and only three opposing (Israel, the United States and Uzbekistan)  Members of the European Union supported this resolution.

RESOLUTION ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
[without reference to a Main Committee (A/51/L.15)]

51/17.

Necessity of ending the economic, commercial and financial embargo imposed by the United States of America against Cuba  

The General Assembly,


Determined to encourage strict compliance with the purposes and principles enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations,

Reaffirming, among other principles, the sovereign equality of States, non-intervention and non-interference in their internal affairs and freedom of international trade and navigation, which are also enshrined in many international legal instruments,

Recalling the statements of the heads of State or Government at the Ibero-American Summits concerning the need to eliminate the unilateral application of economic and trade measures by one State against another which affect the free flow of international trade,


Concerned about the continued promulgation and application by Member States of laws and regulations, such as the one promulgated on 12 March 1996 known as the “Helms-Burton Act”, the extraterritorial effects of which affect the sovereignty of other States, the legitimate interests of entities or persons under their jurisdiction and the freedom of trade and navigation,


Taking note of declarations and resolutions of different intergovernmental forums, bodies and Governments which express the rejection by the international community and public opinion of the promulgation and application of regulations of the kind referred to above, 


Recalling its resolutions 47/19 of 24 November 1992, 48/16 of 3 November 1993, 49/9 of 26 October 1994 and 50/10 of 2 November 1995,  


Concerned that, since the adoption of its resolutions 47/19, 48/16, 49/9 and 50/10, further measures of that nature aimed at strengthening and extending the economic, commercial and financial embargo against Cuba continue to be promulgated and applied, and concerned also about the adverse effects of such measures on the Cuban people and on Cuban nationals living in other countries,


1. Takes note of the report of the Secretary-General 1 on the implementation of resolution 50/10;


2. Reiterates its call on all States to refrain from promulgating and applying laws and measures of the kind referred to in the preamble to the present resolution in conformity with their obligations under the Charter of the United Nations and international law which, inter alia,reaffirm the freedom of trade and navigation;


3. Once again urges States that have and continue to apply such laws and measures to take the necessary steps to repeal or invalidate them as soon as possible in accordance with their legal regime;


4. Requests the Secretary-General, in consultation with the appropriate organs and agencies of the United Nations system, to prepare a report on the implementation of the present resolution in the light of the purposes and principles of the Charter and international law, and to submit it to the General Assembly at its fifty-second session;


5. Decides to include in the provisional agenda of its fifty-second session the item entitled “Necessity of ending the economic, commercial and financial embargo imposed by the United States of America against Cuba”.


US and NATO states opposition to the right to development

The following resolution was approved by 121 states, with 29 abstaining and only one state voting against (The United States).  The abstaining states were for the most part members of NATO.

45/96. Alternative approaches and ways and means within the United Nations system for improv­ing the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms

The General Assembly,

Recalling that in the Charter of the United Nations the peoples of the United Nations declared their deter­mination to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small and to employ international machinery for the promotion of the economic and social advancement of all peoples,

Recalling also the purposes and principles of the Charter to achieve international co-operation in solving international problems of an economic, social, cultural or humanitarian character and in promoting and en­couraging respect for human rights and for fundamen­tal freedoms for all without distinction as to race, sex, language or religion,

Emphasizing the significance and validity of the Uni­versal Declaration of Human Rights’ and of the Inter­national Covenants on Human Rights” in promoting respect for and observance of human rights and funda­mental freedoms,

Recalling further its resolutions relating to the right to development and its resolution 32/130 of 16 December 1977, in which it decided that the approach to future work within the United Nations system with respect to human rights questions should take into account the concepts set forth in that resolution,


Noting with concern that many of the principles enun­ciated therein have not yet been taken under consider­ation by the international community with all the nec­essary dynamism and objectivity,


Emphasizing also the special importance of the pur­poses and principles proclaimed in the Declaration on the Right to Development,”

Recalling Commission on Human Rights resolutions 1990/17 and 1990/18 of 23 February 1990

Taking into account the final documents of the Ninth Conference of Heads of State or Government of Non­Aligned Countries, held at Belgrade from 4 to 7 Sep­tember 1989

Reiterating that the right to development is an inalien­able human right and that equality of development op­portunities is a prerogative both of nations and of indi­viduals within nations,
Expressing its particular concern about the progressive worsening of living conditions in the developing world and the negative impact thereof on the full enjoyment of human rights, and especially about the very serious economic situation of the African continent and the dis­astrous effects of the heavy burden of the external debt for the peoples of Africa, Asia and Latin America,

Reiterating its profound conviction that all human rights and fundamental freedoms are indivisible and interdependent and that equal attention and urgent consideration should be given to the implementation, promotion and protection of civil and political rights and of economic, social and cultural rights,

Deeply convinced that today more than ever, eco­nomic and social development and human rights are complementary elements leading to the same goal, that is, the maintenance of peace and justice among nations as the foundation for the ideals of freedom and well­being to which mankind aspires,

Reiterating that co-operation among all nations on the basis of respect for the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of each State, including the right of every people to choose freely its own socio-eco­nomic and political system, is essential for the promo­tion of peace and development,

Convinced that the primary aim of such international co-operation must be the achievement by all human be­ings of a life of freedom and dignity and freedom from want,

Considering that the efforts of the developing coun­tries for their own development should be supported by an increased flow of resources and by the adoption of appropriate and substantive measures for creating an external environment conducive to such development,

1. Reiterates its request that the Commission on Human Rights should continue its current work on overall analysis with a view to further promoting and strengthening human rights and fundamental freedoms, including the question of the programme and working methods of the Commission, and on the overall analysis of the alternative approaches and ways and means for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms;

2. Affirms that a primary aim of international co-op­eration in the field of human rights is a life of freedom, dignity and peace for all peoples and for every human being, that all human rights and fundamental freedoms arc indivisible and interrelated and that the promotion and protection of one category of rights should never exempt or excuse States from promoting and protecting the others;

3. Reaffirms that equal attention and urgent consid­eration shouldbe given to the implementation, promotion and protection of civil and political rights and of economic, social and cultural rights;

4. Reiterates once again that the international com­munity should accord, or continue to accord, priority to the search for solutions to mass and flagrant violations of human rights of peoples and individuals affected by situations such as those mentioned in paragraph 1 (e) of General Assembly resolution 32/130, paying due at­tention also to other situations of violations of human rights;

5. Reaffirms also that the right to development is an inalienable human right;

6. Reaffirms further that international peace and se­curity are essential elements for achieving full realiza­tion of the right to development;

7. Recognizes that all human rights and fundamen­tal freedoms are indivisible and interdependent;

8. Considers it necessary for all Member States to promote international co-operation on the basis of re­spect for the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of each State, including the right of every peo­ple to choose freely its own socio-economic and politi­cal system, with a view to solving international eco­nomic, social and humanitarian problems;

9. Urges all States to co-operate with the Commis­sion on Human Rights in the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms;

10. Reaffirms once again that, in order to facilitate the full enjoyment of all human rights without dimin­ishing personal dignity, it is necessary to promote the rights to education, work, health and proper nourish­ment through the adoption of measures at the national level, including those that provide for the right of work­ers to participate in management, as well as the adop­tion of measures at the international level, including the establishment of the new international economic order;

11. Decides that the approach to future work within the United Nations system on human rights matters should also take into account the content of the Decla­ration on the Right to Development and the need for the implementation thereof;

12. Decides also to include in the provisional agenda of its forty-sixth session the item entitled “Alternative approaches and ways and means within the United Na­tions system for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms”.