A Peaceful, Silent, Deadly Remedy: The Ethics of Economic Sanctions

Economic sanctions are emerging as one of the major tools of international governance in the post-Cold War era. Sanctions have long been seen as a form of political intervention that does not cause serious human damage, and therefore does not raise pressing ethical questions. However, the nature of sanctions is that they effectively target the most vulnerable and least political sectors of society, and for this reason they must be subject to ethical scrutiny.

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Starvation as a Weapon: Legal Implications of the United Nations Food Blockade Against Iraq and Kuwait

In this article, I analyze the legal and factual background of the food blockade against Iraq (1990-), and then assess its compliance with international humanitarian law. I conclude that the U.N., the members of the Security Council, and the countries that participated violated several mandatory humanitarian norms in enforcing the food blockade.

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United States’ Foreseeability, Awareness and Knowledge of the Consequences of the Sanctions Against Iraq

United States’ Foreseeability, Awareness and Knowledge of the Consequences of the Sanctions Against Iraq Elias Davidsson 2004 Introduction In order to determine to which extent individual leaders who imposed and maintained¬†economic sanctions against Iraq can be held responsible for the … Continue reading