Category Archives: World Zionist institutions

Proposed Policy Guidelines for the National Institutions of the Jewish People (IV)

Proposed Policy Guidelines for the National Institutions of the Jewish People (IV)


Avraham Burg
June 1995-Sivan 5755

Part Three:  Global Jewish Information Network

Adapting our National Institutions to the Challenges Ahead
In light of the extraordinary challenges which the Jewish People faces in the century ahead, it is critical that we shape our National Institutions as effectively as possible.

The decision to restructure a worldwide organization which represents religious streams, Jewish communities, political parties and a wide range of Jewish interests should not be taken lightly. However, change is imperative, as all partners in the organization are coming to realize.

Organizations exist to serve goals and objectives and have no intrinsic value in and of themselves. The structures and the functional instrumentalities they create are merely a means of putting their policies into practice. Nevertheless, in the current situation of the Jewish People, as we face serious danger and challenges which require the mobilization of all our resources, organizational structures are not without importance. We cannot afford to make do with structures which are far from optimal. In order to succeed in our mission, we need an organization and structure which are optimally suited to meeting the goals the Jewish People has set for itself.

From "The Jewish Agency for Israel" to "The Jewish Agency of The Jewish People"
Our National Institutions will require a redefinition of their function. Israel will continue to be central to the Jewish world, but the activities of the Jewish People will no longer radiate entirely from the periphery to the Israeli center. They will become two-directional between periphery and center. The only way to protect the interests of the entire Jewish People, including the Jews in the Land of Zion, is to take an unfettered look at reality and accept the fact that the continuity of the Jewish People, an indispensable component of Israel’s strength, will demand both enormous investment in the Diaspora by Israelis as well as enormous investment in Israel by the Jews of the Diaspora.

Unifying the Jewish Agency and the World Zionist Organization
Two of the central institutions of the Jewish People, the Jewish Agency for Israel and the World Zionist Organization and its affiliated agencies, currently operate in most areas independently of each other. They must function as one body. Unification will result in a more economical operation, greater efficiency and more effective use of human resources.
In 1997, the Zionist Congress will meet in Jerusalem to celebrate the one hundredth anniversary of the Zionist Movement. It must convene on a new foundation. Starting at the 10th Congress of the Zionist Movement, the representative National Institutions of the Jewish People will work in a united framework: one People, one body.

At the June 1995 meetings of the Zionist General Council and the Jewish Agency Assembly we will begin the process of determining the organizational and representational structure of the unified institutions, delegating authority and laying down guidelines for funding and operation. At the June 1996 convention, the proposed options will be discussed and voted upon. The National Institutions will convene in their unified format one year later.

On that occasion we will create a new covenant between the partners in the management of the affairs of the Jewish People, the Jewish National Institutions and the Government of Israel. The new covenant will supersede all prior covenants and agreements.

Changing the Image of the National Institutions
The National Institutions of the Jewish People face the difficult challenge of changing their negative image in the eyes of the Israeli public and Diaspora Jewry. A Gallup poll conducted in Israel revealed that most respondents had no idea what the Jewish Agency and the World Zionist Organization actually do.

The Jewish National Institutions will, within the framework of their new policy and structure, work vigorously to change existing perceptions, thus helping to cultivate the conditions necessary to fulfill the goals of the Jewish People.

Within a month, a tender will be issued for the centralized public relations management of the National Institutions. Toward the beginning of the Jewish New Year, we will embark upon a public relations campaign with budgets and objectives determined by an internal steering committee. The purpose of the campaign will be to bring about the desired change in the public perception of the functions and importance of the Jewish National Institutions.

Restructuring the National Institutions on a Regional Organizational Basis
The objectives of restructuring our Jewish National Institutions include both the unification of all the major bodies which represent the interests of the Jewish People, and their reconfiguration to meet the present and future needs and goals of the Jewish People. We must conduct a comprehensive discussion on this matter and examine the options of organization on the basis of departmental function (education, aliyah, etc.) versus organization on a territorial basis. It appears that organization on a territorial basis, augmented by professional staff units in various functional spheres, can provide an optimal response to the needs of those who use the services of the National Institutions both in Israel and the Diaspora.

For years, due to a constellation of historical, economic and personal factors, the National Institutions of the Jewish People have placed particular emphasis on activity in the Jewish communities of North America.

One of the objectives of a new territorial organizational structure will be to ensure that appropriate attention is given to all communities of the Jewish People, including those outside of North America.

Establishing an Information Unit
The National Institutions are in urgent need of centralized information on a variety of subjects to assist the departments and staff responsible for operations which take place under the aegis of the Executive.

The gathering of information, its analysis and evaluation will be entrusted to an information unit which will report to the Chairperson of the National Institutions. The unit will amass information on the condition of Jewish communities throughout the globe, follow events in the Jewish and non-Jewish world and analyze their potential impact on relevant Jewish communities. It will assemble information about anti-Semitic incidents, economic upheavals and military actions and analyze their ramifications for the Jews. Angry words can sometimes escalate into violence in a matter of days. The tenor of relations between Jewish communities and their surroundings can also change quickly. Thus there is vital importance to the continuous availability of up-to-date information.

The information unit will also supply research, analysis, evaluation and survey services to the various agencies of the national institutions. It will examine economic issues, perceptual issues, positions and viewpoints In the Jewish world, and various marketing issues.

The unit will serve as an instrument for understanding trends in the Jewish world, evaluating the success of the projects and operations of the National Institutions, and providing decision-makers with feedback on the effectiveness of their policy.
 
Guaranteeing the Operating Budget of Jewish National Institutions
The current budgetary constraints affecting our National Institutions seriously limit their ability for long-term strategic planning as well as their ability to meet existing commitments to objectives already mandated by their leadership.

We must therefore reorganize the income mechanism of the National Institutions while examining expenditures with a critical eye and attempt to improve fiscal management.

The National Institutions will enter into discussion with the bodies which fund its activities and examine the principles which determine the allocation of funds. The entire leadership will take an active part in fundraising efforts and joint projects will be financed by the anticipated increase in resources in the wake of the reordering of budgetary priorities.

Establishment of "Keren Matat" – our Gift to Future Generations
While redesigning their organizational and financial mechanisms, the Jewish National Institutions will establish a new fund for the Jewish People. This fund will be the gift of the Jewish People to its future generations. At the end of this century, on December 31, 1999, Keren Matat will become the contribution of this generation to ensuring the continuity of the Jewish People and its security in the generations to come.

The purpose of the fund will be to finance projects that will assure the viability and continued existence of the Jewish People by ways and means to be determined by the leadership of the National Institutions in a democratic process representing the whole of the Jewish world. The fund will provide the monies necessary to win the battles against the dangers looming before the Jewish People: assimilation, alienation, the disappearance of community life and a widening gap between Israel society and Diaspora Jewry. It will operate under the auspices of the Jewish National Institutions, using income from the principal, and will be supervised by an independent body to evaluate its effectiveness.

The establishment of this fund will hopefully ease some of the financial constraints presently hindering the work of the National Institutions of the Jewish People.

Through Keren Matat, we will move from a system of repeated one-time contributions to a financial endowment, the fruits of which can be used for many decades. Our goal is to enable future generations to work for the good of the Jewish People, relieved of the constant necessity to search for sources of funding.

Uncertainties constitute a serious management constraint for the institutions of the Jewish People. When we attempt to shape the spiritual and organizational future of the Jewish People, we must look ahead – not past the end of the fiscal year, but past the next generation. In this context, one of the gravest mishaps which can befall the Jewish People is that its leadership will be unable to plan for the long-term. It goes without saying that in order to plan for the long-term, we must allocate resources for the long-term.

The transformation we must effect in the condition of the Jewish People calls for planning programs to be implemented over the course of many years, supervision which will guarantee the feasibility of long-range initiatives, and a system which continuously evaluates and learns from itself so as to maximize and optimize its effectiveness in the future. Keren Matat will provide the Jewish People with the fiscal means to fill these requisites for success.

The funds for Keren Matat will come, first and foremost, from the Jewish People. Every member of the Jewish People will be invited to contribute, according to his/her means. Keren Matat will be more than a vehicle to raise money to ensure the continuity of the Jewish People. It will be a vehicle through which every Jew can demonstrate his/her identification with the Jewish People, his/her commitment to its continued existence and vitality, to its values and inheritance by future generations. The fund will be based on multi year, rather than one-time, donations of every size and will strive to become the beneficiary of bequests by Jews in Israel and the Diaspora.

The Zionist leadership will invite the governments of nations around the world to contribute to Keren Matat. Thus it would be only fitting that this year, as the world celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of the Allied victory over the Nazis who annihilated one-third of the Jewish People, the enlightened nations of the world should be asked to take part in efforts to guarantee the continuity of the Jewish People.

An additional and important source of funding is within reach of the Jewish People: the considerable assets left by the victims of Nazi destruction. It is only just that the economic assets of the people slaughtered simply because they were Jews, be dedicated to assuring the well-being of the Jewish People. Our National Institutions will therefore appeal to governments, organizations, banking institutions and any other body or agency, which makes use of, or has benefited from, the property of Jewish victims now or during the last fifty years. These institutions will be asked to transfer the assets or the income from them to the fund for upbuilding the Jewish People in the twenty first century. A concentrated and forceful effort in this direction, backed by governments and international organizations, can bear fruit.

Ongoing Participation of Community Leaders in the Decision-Making Process
One of the operational spheres needing change is the degree of participation by of Diaspora community leaders in daily decision-making processes, which concern the Jewish People as a whole. It is not enough for Diaspora leaders to meet in Israel once every few months at the Assembly or Board of Governors. The Diaspora partners must take an ongoing part in issues at hand.

Technologies now at our disposal enable electronic conferences, which do not require the participants to be together in one physical location. The Jewish National Institutions must establish a regular, efficient and inexpensive mechanism to allow ongoing contact between all members of the leadership of the Jewish People. Telephone and video conference calls should become routine. The Jewish People’s leadership should meet at least monthly, by phone or video, to discuss their agenda and to receive progress reports on plans and operations.

Establishing Communications Channels for Every Jew Who Wants To Be Heard
It is important to create accessible opportunities for every Jew to speak his/her mind on Jewish public affairs. Ever since the inauguration of popular democracy, 2500 years ago, democratic bodies have been set back by the lack of tools allowing every person to make his/her voice heard directly by the leaders.

Those tools are available today. Attached to this document is a list of electronic means by which anyone who wishes may send messages to the Office of the Chairman of the JAFI/WZO. These means include facsimile and electronic mail via international communications networks such as Compuserve and Internet.

All messages will be checked on a daily basis, studied and considered in the formulation of policy.

Negotiating a New Division of Responsibility With the Government of Israel
The law which established the special status of the Jewish National Institutions also granted them the right and responsibility to operate broadly in a variety of spheres. However, since the enactment of the law and the signing of covenants and agreements with the Israeli governments, the State of Israel and the Jewish world have undergone fundamental changes which necessitate a redivision of labor between the parties.

The Jewish National Institutions will open immediate negotiations with official representatives at every level of the Government of Israel to formulate a new covenant for cooperation between the parties. The covenant will redefine the tasks and spheres of responsibility of the Jewish National Institutions and modes of interaction with the Government of Israel.

Changing the Organizational Culture of our Jewish National Institutions
Although our National Institutions operate efficiently in many spheres and in accordance with the norms of proper public management, their organizational culture is sometimes far from satisfactory. Some of its operations are characterized by excessive bureaucracy and insufficient personal responsibility of those in charge at various levels of the system. There is sometimes expensive redundancy in the work of certain units; units sometimes operate at cross ends to the work of other units; departments sometimes compete among themselves for resources, status and influence, at the expense of effectiveness; lack of coordination between departments sometimes causes mismanagement; there is not always the desired correlation between authority and responsibility.

We must invest, in the near future, a considerable effort in transforming the organizational culture of the Jewish National Institutions so as: to cultivate staff commitment to the organization; to strengthen the staff’s philosophy of service to its external and internal consumers; to establish clear criteria for evaluation of staff and measuring the efficacy of operations; to build incentives for staff excellence and executive management tracks which will encourage involvement and identification with various spheres of organizational activity; to limit terms of office in certain positions; to increase job mobility and to open horizontal lines of job movement; to advance the role of women in the organization; and to create a culture of excellence at every level of management and operation.

The Office of the Chairman, JAFI/WZO
P.O.B. 92
Jerusalem 91 000

 

Proposed Policy Guidelines for the National Institutions of the Jewish People (III)

Proposed Policy Guidelines for the National Institutions of the Jewish People (III)


Avraham Burg
June 1995-Sivan 5755 

Part Two: Toward the Twenty-First Century – Challenges Facing the Jewish National Institutions

The complex web of threats and opportunities in the Jewish world poses a great challenge to the National Institutions of the Jewish People.

Those who believe today that we can do without the National Institutions and allow the Jewish world to develop without coordination, may, within a few short generations, find themselves closing one of the finest chapters ever written in the history of nations and human civilization. They may find themselves witness to no less than the destruction of the Jewish People.

Nonetheless, the claim that our National Institutions in their current form do not meet the needs of the Jewish People is not unfounded. We must redefine the tasks of these institutions and implement a range of projects and methods of operation to fulfill the tasks. We must restructure our institutions accordingly and provide the services which Jews need as we approach a new century.

Part Two describes the central missions which loom before us: the battle against assimilation in the Diaspora, the battle against alienation from Judaism and Israeli estrangement from the Jewish People, and the battle to bridge the widening gap between Jews in Israel and the Diaspora. Toward this end, we will recommend several methods of operation, and propose a range of programs and projects for consideration and implementation.

The proposed projects are in various stages of development: some are ready for immediate implementation following approval by the appropriate agencies; some are still being worked on; others can serve as food for thought by Jews around the world who, by offering their comments, can take an active role in shaping the destiny of the Jewish People.

Challenges in the Latter Half of the Twentieth Century
Addressing the Outcome of the Holocaust and of the Establishment of the State of Israel

In the latter half of the twentieth century, the Jewish People has had to deal with two polar events of overriding significance in its history: the annihilation of European Jewry and the emergence of a sovereign Jewish society in the Land of Israel.

The Jewish People has had to marshal all of its powers in order to survive the trauma of losing more than a third of its members. On the eve of the Second World War, there were some seventeen million Jews. Only eleven million were left when Nazi Germany surrendered to the Allies. Six million persons were slaughtered because they were Jews.

And out of the destruction, like a phoenix whose spirit could not be broken, arose a new entity for which the Jewish world had yearned for two thousand years. A state emerged in the Land of Israel, opened its gates to every Jew in every corner of the world, and proclaimed itself the nation-state of the Jewish People.

Jews throughout the Diaspora gathered together and gave their all to ensure the existence of the State of Israel; Jews in Israel sacrificed their lives to defend its security; Jews in the Diaspora worked unceasingly to guarantee the prosperity of the young state.

During the latter half of this century, the National Institutions focused their efforts on assisting the Jewish ingathering in the Land of Israel. They were the central instrument for enlisting the forces of the Jewish periphery in order to build a Jewish national center. The fragile state of the Jews in the Land of Israel was faced with challenges which no other people has ever had to meet. After two thousand years of dispersion, the Jews managed to breathe new life into an ancient language, to build an impressive economy and an unparalleled military force which ultimately brought its Arab neighbors to accept the State of Israel as a fact of life.

Now that the political and military configurations in the Middle East have undergone a transformation, the focus of activity of the Jewish People must change. Today the National Institutions face new challenges, no less important than those of the past.

Challenges of the Twenty-First Century

The Battle Against Assimilation in the Diaspora

To halt assimilation, the greatest danger to the Jewish People in the next century, our National Institutions must present a program of principles, values and ideas, along with the organizational, political and economic tools to implement them.

The premiere tool at the disposal of the Jewish People in its fight against assimilation is Jewish-Zionist education.
 
Jewish-Zionist Education

There are three million children and youths in the Jewish world today. Half of them are being raised and educated in Israel, and half in the Diaspora.

Of the 1,500,000 Jewish children in the Diaspora, approximately 1,115,000 live in North America. Only half of the children in the Diaspora receive a Jewish education of any sort. Only a small minority of children living in Israel receive a Jewish-Zionist education which gives them the ability to weigh the long-term implications of life in the state of the Jewish People against other options. These children are the target population for the Jewish-Zionist educational activities of our National Institutions and we must reach them.

The Values and Content of Jewish-Zionist Education
The urgent need to redefine the values and traditions we will impart to our young people is not unique to the Jewish People. There is a general difficulty in conveying humanist values in a technological society. The world of the twenty first century, in which young people wander through the virtual reality of cyberspace, may become a world in which the only values are those of economic success and material achievement.

Moreover, bountiful technologies, which provide an almost endless number of channels to convey educational messages, may sometimes overshadow the content of education. The medium may become the central message. Therefore, when defining our educational tasks, we must not only define the means and the technological tools we will use in our educational systems in Israel and the Diaspora, we must also conduct an open dialogue regarding the content and messages of Jewish-Zionist education.

Our proposal is that Jewish education in Israel and the Diaspora focus on Judaism as a multi-faceted world offering an ever evolving, unique and pluralistic national culture.

The Jewish identity which our National Institutions will try to impart to youth in Israel and the Diaspora will emphasize varied elements of religious tradition which touch upon bonds with the Land of Israel, knowledge of its past, its historical sites, its beauty and natural landscapes. It will emphasize the foundations of the Hebrew language and literature, and the values of personal and social morality and ethics which infuse Zionist ideology.

The educational curricula developed by our National Institutions will present Jewish studies from an interdisciplinary and critical perspective, examining texts and sources from different periods and cultures. Jewish studies will integrate general studies of personal and national moral dilemmas within the broad cultural contexts which give rise to tradition and shape values.

One of the important tasks of Jewish-Zionist education will be to define the basic components of Jewish studies which will be mandatory for Jewish children in all parts of the world. This will include exposure to the foundations of the Jewish religion, chapters in the history of Israel, contemporary Judaism in the Diaspora, ramifications of the Holocaust and Zionist history. The curriculum will also include Israeli geography, holidays and festivals (each year, one or two will be studied in depth), familiarity with the prayer book and exposure to Talmudic thinking through the study of a page of Gemara.

In addition to these mandatory subjects, supplementary programs will be developed in accordance with the needs of each community and may include in-depth study of the history and customs unique to a particular Jewish community.

The educational curricula will be developed for use both in formal and informal educational frameworks, including study groups, lectures, symposia, seminars and events connected to Jewish learning. They will be adapted for both single age and multi-generational use, including family programming which will permit parents and children to spend time together in experiential learning of Jewish texts.

The content of Jewish-Zionist education will be reshaped by experts prepared to contribute their talents, energy and expertise to this exciting task. However, not only the content must be revised, but also the means we use to convey it.

Although many children in Israel and the Diaspora regard Jewish studies as a joyless collection of boring facts, this does not attest to the poverty of the sources of Jewish culture. Rather, it indicates a poverty of creative thought and a failure to present Jewish-Zionist education in ways that are suited to the expectations, needs and habits of young Jews heading toward the twenty first century.

Jewish-Zionist education must be based on the values of Jewish religion, the study of Jewish history and heritage and an understanding of the many facets of Judaism. It must be accompanied by a study of the Hebrew language. Jewish study must become a source of pleasure. In this technological age, the acquisition of knowledge must be perceived by the student not only as a means to an end, but as a satisfying and pleasurable process in itself.

Thus, the study of Hebrew must be constructed so as to provide satisfaction and enjoyment in the learning and enable the young Diaspora Jew to feel at home when visiting Israel. A working knowledge of Hebrew must give its speakers a membership card into a worldwide club of partners in an ancient language which few others understand, and pose for them an intellectual challenge in understanding the roots of one of the most fascinating cultures in human history.

Conveying the Centrality of Israel to Diaspora Jews
A central goal of Jewish-Zionist education is to convey the centrality of Israel to Jews around the world. There is no contradiction between strengthening Jewish communities in the Diaspora in their struggle against assimilation and encouraging Aliyah to Israel while nurturing the centrality of Israel in the collective Jewish consciousness. The disappearance of the Diaspora is not something we can expect to witness in our lifetimes. Jews from the west are not expected to come to Israel en masse in the foreseeable future. Therefore, the State of Israel and the Zionist Movement have a clear interest in strengthening the Jewish consciousness of Jews in the Diaspora. The survival of strong, proud Jewish communities is the only guarantee of a reservoir of Jews who may someday choose to link their fates with the Jewish People and its nation-state, Israel. There is also no contradiction in the long-run between strengthening the cohesion of the community and preserving its Jewish character on the one hand, and encouraging Aliyah to Israel on the other If the State of Israel wishes to benefit from the enormous potential of Aliyah from affluent countries, it must first guarantee the continued Jewish identity of individuals and communities in the Jewish world. Without strong Jewish identity and a strong bond to the Land of Israel, there is no hope of reviving the idea of Aliyah.

Creating a Framework to Train Educators and Teachers
Deepening Jewish-Zionist education in Israel and the Diaspora requires an investment in teachers of excellence. To this end, we must make every effort to train professional educators who are capable of adapting general curricula to the specific needs of each community.

One of the most difficult problems in the sphere of Jewish-Zionist education is the creation of an infrastructure for training quality teachers. Many communities suffer from a severe shortage of talented educators. The pool of Jewish studies teachers in Israel is also insufficient: despite the availability of academic Jewish Studies programs, few graduates of these programs go into teaching. Between 1980 and 1992, the number of Israel university graduates attending teaching programs in Talmud and/or Jewish Philosophy (Ben-Gurion, Bar lIan, Haifa, Tel-Aviv and Hebrew Universities) rose from a total of two students to eleven.

The National Institutions of the Jewish People will establish a comprehensive system for training teachers and other educational personnel in Israel and abroad. The system will offer outstanding young people incentives to enter the field of Jewish education. Efforts will be invested in encouraging university and college students to choose this profession. Scholarships will be given to outstanding Jewish studies students who train as teachers and commit themselves to working in the field for a stipulated period of time. Similarly, scholarships will be made available to students in other disciplines who wish to switch their field of expertise to Jewish studies and instruction.

Together with the effort to enlarge the pool of Jewish studies teachers in Israel and the Diaspora, the National Institutions will establish comprehensive in-service training programs for teachers who now work in the field of Jewish-Zionist education. These programs will offer advanced study in various subjects, including integrative approaches to Jewish studies, contemporary Judaism and its different streams, Jewish identity and the study of the heritage of the communities of Israel. Summer courses will be developed for teachers, and incentives will be offered to teachers on sabbatical who participate in advanced courses in interdisciplinary Jewish studies.

To meet the different needs of Jewish communities around the world, teachers will be hired from within the community or from Israel. Some may move from one Diaspora community to another.

Involvement of Israelis Residing in the Diaspora in the Jewish-Zionist Education System

One of the resources at the disposal of the Jewish-Zionist education system in the Diaspora is Israelis who have left the State of Israel and, for various reasons, chosen to live in other countries. This population includes emissaries of institutions and organizations, academician on sabbatical, and a relatively large number of Yordim. The Jewish National Institutions will maintain an up-to-date databank of Israelis residing in the Diaspora who are interested in taking part in Jewish-Zionist educational activities.

Emissaries of institutions, organizations and economic companies, together with their families, will be invited to take part in this task. Academics on sabbatical will be invited to appear before various community forums. Among the Yordim, an effort will be made to identify people with talent for teaching Jewish and Zionist subjects. Those selected will receive training in their places of residence to ensure their skills in transmitting educational messages and their commitment to doing so.

The proposal to include Yordim in a Jewish-Zionist education system will surely arouse surprise. It would therefore be productive to examine more closely the approach which our National Institutions should adopt toward the phenomenon of Yerida.

The Jewish People has always wandered from place to place. In no period of Jewish history have individuals not chosen to leave their homes and build their lives somewhere else. A Jew who decided to move from one place to another could live a rich and full Jewish life in his/her new place of residence. Migration has always been legitimate in the Jewish world.

That fact should inform the attitude of our National Institutions toward Yordim. The individual who chooses to live his/her life outside the borders of the State of Israel is entitled to do so. After all, the establishment of the State of the Jewish People was never intended to build walls which would prevent its citizens from living elsewhere. Heaven preserve us from a country in which its citizens feel like prisoners. Jewish-Zionist education for Israelis should stress the advantages of life in their country. It should present the State of Israel to the young Israeli as the only place in the world where s/he can live a full Jewish life in the deepest sense of the word, with an unconditional connection to one’s roots and the surrounding cultural, political and social environment.

But if, nonetheless, a young Israeli chooses to go abroad to study, or to travel around the world for several years, or to make his/her living abroad, the Jewish People must not turn him/her into a "public enemy" to be ostracized.

The principle which should determine the attitude of our National Institutions toward Israelis living in the Diaspora is that a Jew who leaves the State of Israel is not a Yored to be shunned, but rather a fellow Jew. S/he is worthy of all the respect due a human being and a Jew, and if s/he wishes to be a partner in Jewish education or other spheres of activity in the Jewish world, s/he should be allowed to do so. The saying that Israel, despite its sins, remains Israel, must certainly apply to people who have committed no sin other than trying to build their lives.

Furthermore, given that one of the declared and agreed upon aims of the Jewish National Institutions is the encouragement of Aliyah, the attitude toward Israelis living abroad should follow accordingly. Bringing the Israeli who lives outside the Jewish world closer to spheres of Jewish and Zionist activity may strengthen his/her connection to Judaism and Zionist ideology.

It is possible that for some individuals, participation in Jewish educational activity will serve as a springboard for heightened status or economic gain which will actually help them build a home in the Diaspora. However, there is no doubt that many others will discover the advantages of affiliating with the Jewish People and disseminating its age-old values.

Determining Qualitative and Quantitative Goals for Jewish Education
An educational program aimed at hundreds of thousands of Jewish children who currently receive no Jewish education cannot be valid if it is not based on a multi-year plan. In addition to the qualitative definitions of the program content and the means of implementing it in the educational process, we must also define quantitative goals with respect to the number of pupils in Jewish-Zionist educational systems and the specific amount of core material to be learned.

Together with local Jewish leadership in Diaspora communities, it will be necessary to establish priorities for educational programming and the size of the target population each year, in each community.

Each community will be asked to prepare a plan for local dissemination of Jewish education. Jewish communities will be able to make use of "expert services", including questionnaires, computer programs and consultants. This will assist them in determining their qualitative goals, the tools to be employed and their budgetary resources.

Development of General Educational Programs
With a Jewish Perspective Development of General Educational Programs With a Jewish Perspective

Our National Institutions must offer Jewish students not only programs with sectarian Jewish content, but also combinations of informal and formal educational programs which emphasize the Jewish contribution to world civilization in the spheres of science, academia, literature and the humanities in various historical periods.

Jewish-Zionist values cannot be conveyed through an exclusively patronizing attitude toward other cultures and traditions. They must be founded on a sense of respect and appreciation of others combined with knowledge and pride in the unique contribution Jews have made to civilization.

Establishment of An Open University of the Jewish People
An ambitious plan for revitalizing Jewish-Zionist education is the establishment of an Open University of the Jewish People based in Jerusalem. Although the university may be associated with the Hebrew University and other Israeli institutions of higher education, it will develop programs tailor-made for its students. The Open University will offer B.A. and M.A. degrees in Jewish studies to anyone wishing to study for an academic degree.

Psychographic segmentation (social status, life style): Psychographic factors will affect the consumer patterns for education al services. In communities with a five-day workweek, the leisure time available to potential consumers of Jewish-Zionist education is obviously different from that of other communities.

In some communities, adults will prefer group learning and peer group sessions while others may choose individual study tracks.

Behavioral segmentation: Our market study must include behavioral factors of potential education consumers. Some local institutions will organize intensive family study vacations while others will prefer enrichment courses. In some places, educational activities will be multi-generational and in others, they will be based on professional affinity or peer groups.

 

Proposed Policy Guidelines for the National Institutions of the Jewish People (II)

Proposed Policy Guidelines for the National Institutions of the Jewish People (II)

Drafted by Avraham Burg, June 1995

Declaration of Principles

Whereas
the strength and continued existence of the Jewish People is threatened by assimilation in the Diaspora and by estrangement from the Jewish People of parts of the Jewish community in Israel;

And Whereas
a comprehensive battle must be waged against all forms of ignorance, assimilation and alienation;

And Whereas
victory in this battle depends upon cooperation among all parts of the Jewish People;

Therefore
Jewish-Zionist education must become the top priority of the Jewish People and its representatives, both in the Diaspora and in Israel. The national institutions of the Jewish People will give priority in their activities to the Jewish-Zionist education of one and a half million Jewish children in the Diaspora, and one and a half million Jewish children in Israel.
Enormous effort must be invested in encouraging Aliyah from both the East and the West. In order to ensure identification with Israel and Aliyah in the future, the Jewish communities of the Diaspora must be strengthened. Diaspora Jews must become more involved in building the society and the Land of Israel, developing frameworks, which will turn the State of Israel into a magnet for masses of Jews.

Unaffiliated Jews in the Diaspora must be encouraged to take part in Jewish-Zionist activity.

Creative and effective modes of communication between Jews in the Diaspora and in Israel must be developed.

The national institutions of the Jewish People must be restructured as a partnership between the Jews of Israel and the Jewish communities in the Diaspora.

Introduction
Summary of Major Issues
Major Threats to the Jewish People
Threat to Physical Existence.
* Threat to communal existence due to the rise in antisemitism and
chauvinism.
* Economic hardship.
* Threat to social cohesion and a sense of community. * The spiritual threat of assimilation in the Diaspora.
* The spiritual threat of weakened Jewish identity and alienation from Judaism in Israel.
* The dangers of a widening chasm between the Jews of Israel and the Jews of the Diaspora
Opportunities Open to the Jewish People.
* A decrease in the physical threat to the existence of the State ofIsrael.
* Possibilities of continued mass Aliyah to Israel.
* Growing communal awareness, concern and willingness to act in order to impart a new sense of meaning to Jewish life.
* The emergence of new young leadership in Jewish communal life.
* Growing willingness for change in Diaspora communities and Israeli society.
* Innovative and accessible technologies
Challenges Facing the National Institutions.
* To impart Jewish-Zionist education.
* To shape a new Jewish-Zionist identity in Israel.
* To strengthen the sense of community among Jews in Israel.
* To build a new partnership between the Jews in Israel and the Diaspora
Guidelines for a New Policy.
* Development of multi-faceted programs for formal and informal Jewish and Zionist education for use in Israel and the Diaspora; development of quality family programming.
* Creation of meaningful content for Israeli Jewishness through programming in schools; recognition of the validity of various modes of Judaism in the State of Israel; effective responses to the civil needs of immigrants in Israel and the depoliticization of religion.
* Creation of an equitable partnership between the Jews of the Diaspora and Israel in the management of Jewish national institutions.
* Negotiation with the Government of Israel regarding a new division of responsibilities between the government and the Jewish national institutions.
* Allocation of resources for programs in the Diaspora targeting unaffiliated Jews.
* Encouragement of visits to Israel in a broad range of frameworks.
* Involvement of Israelis residing abroad, including shlichim, academics on sabbatical, and Yordim, in Jewish education in the Diaspora.
* Emphasis in the Diaspora on activities sponsored by communal institutions and frameworks such as community centers, synagogues, college campuses, and summer camps.
* Ongoing involvement of Diaspora community leaders in decision-making
Projects for Consideration and Approval During 1995.
* Establishment of an Open University of the Jewish People in Jerusalem.
* Establishment of an Israeli United Fundraising Appeal.
* Establishment of a Jewish lobby in Israel within the framework of the Jewish National Institutions.
* Merger between the Jewish Agency and the World Zionist Organization.
* Improvement of the public perception of the Jewish National Institutions.
* Establishment of an Authority for Returning Shlichim.
* Establishment of an information unit in charge of data collection, analysis and surveys affiliated with the Jewish Agency Executive
Projects for Discussion and Response.
* Establishment of "Keren Matat": A Fund for Future Generations.
* Ensuring a regular income for activities of the National Institutions of the Jewish People.
* Development of frameworks for training teachers and other educational personnel; promoting Jewish education as a preferred profession.
* A referendum of the Jewish People.
* Establishment of an umbrella organization for Jewish organizations.
* Establishment of a network of high-quality Jewish schools.
* Establishment of a Jewish Peace Corps which will emphasize the value of national service for the entire Jewish People, will create a joint corps of Jews from Israel and the Diaspora to serve in distressed Jewish communities, to rebuild, maintain and preserve sites and facilities of importance to the Jewish People throughout the world, to provide services to the elderly, the young and the infirm, and to engage in humanitarian activities, also among non-Jewish populations.
* Development of a satellite communications network for Jewish and Israeli culture.
* Participation in the development of centers of science and advanced technology in Israel.
* Participation in the creation of an advanced information infrastructure in Israel.
* Development of a broad range of computer-based educational programs, multimedia programs for individual study, the use of information highways as a tool for Jewish education, and interactive information banks specializing in Jewish-Zionist subjects.
* Establishment of a distribution system for books, software, radio and television programs about Jewish, Israeli and Zionist issues

Proposed Policy Guidelines for the National Institutions of the Jewish People (I)

Proposed Policy Guidelines for the National Institutions of the Jewish People were drafted by Avraham Burg, former Israeli MK and prominent member of the Knesset's Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee, the Finance Committee and the State Control Committee. In February 1995, Burg was elected Chairman of the Executive of the Jewish Agency for Israel and the World Zionist Organization. His draft is made after his election to this influential position.

 

Brit Am: A Covenant of The People

Proposed Policy Guidelines for the National Institutions of the Jewish People (I)


Avraham Burg
June 1995-Sivan 5755

For three who are part of me: my God, my parents and my family. For three who are with me: my friends, my compatriots, my People.

These are the things which man performs and enjoys their fruits in this world, while the principal remains for him for the world to come, namely: honoring one's parents, the practice of loving deeds, and making peace between man and his fellow, while the study of the Torah surpasses them all. (Tractate Shabbat, p. 127a)

This is the tradition of the life of the Jew: the family in its generations, the friends who need him, the guests in his house, the indigent, the orphan and the infirm with whom he shares what he has; he pursues justice with all his might; his family is the core of his personal and national existence, and study surpasses them all: education and Jewish enlightment, for this is where all begins, and the purpose of all.

Shalom,
These are days of challenge. Difficult yet interesting times. The end of an old era and the beginning of a new one. The twentieth century draws to a close. We have been chosen to carry the torch of Judaism from our time into that of our children. It is we who shall be the standard-bearers of the Judaism of the twenty first century. As I stand before the public today, I am reminded of the Reader's Prayer during the High Holy Days:

Here I stand, impoverished in merit, trembling in Your presence, pleading on behalf of Your people Israel even though I am unfit and unworthy for the task …. make my errand successful when I seek mercy for myself and those who have commissioned me …. May they not be shamed for my deeds; and may their deeds cause me no shame …. Transform our afflictions to joy and gladness, life and peace. May we always love truth and peace …. For in mercy do You hear the prayer of Israel, Your people. Blessed are You, merciful God who hears prayer.

In the course of history, more than one enemy has risen to destroy us, but we have always found an answer. We had hope. Our paths were illumined by faith in our destiny and in our mission, in God and God's people. But the times we live in offer no answers. Questions and doubts abound. The common denominators, which held us together, are fast wearing thin. Assimilation ravages us, and among our children there is almost no language of values common to all.

Over the past few years we at the National Institutions, together with other dedicated men and women, have been doing all we can to rescue and resuscitate the last of the large Jewish communities in distress – the Jews of the former Soviet Union. When the revival of this remarkable Jewry is complete, it will mark the successful fulfillment of an historic mission of salvation undertaken by the Jewish People, the Zionist Movement and the State of Israel. And then we will be face to face with ourselves and the painful dialogue between Israeli society and western Jewry. We will ask searching questions but find only partial answers. We will struggle daily under the weight of the responsibility of passing on to our children the splendors of the heritage we received from our parents. Are we to be the last Zionists? Are we to be the last generation of united Jewry? Will we have the strength to find an answer and prove that yes, the Jewish People can survive without an external enemy?

On the following pages, I have attempted to share my beliefs and hopes, to sketch both the broad strokes and the fine lines of what I envisage as our daily work in the years and the century to come. The future will bring with it many changes. Much that is unimportant and irrelevant will disappear. New issues will be born and become central in our lives. In two respects we shall all be tested: Will we prove wise enough to free ourselves of what were once assets and have become burdens, lest they enchain us until the end of our days, and will we know how to embrace the new and renew ourselves so that we are able to play a role in the future?

On one thing, I hope, we stand united: The belief that none of the organizations which comprise our National Institutions is an end in itself. We are all the servants of a network of goals greater than any that can be borne alone. Only if we are capable of change, of confronting these goals together, is there justification for our organizational existence.

I believe with perfect faith that, in view of the separatism which infuses the actions of so many Jewish groups today, there is a compelling need, now more than ever before, for a supreme Jewish national institution able to marshal the forces necessary to overcome the internal schisms and insensitivities which threaten to rip us apart.

This proposal is not all-inclusive; it is a draft. Together we shall write the final version. I look forward to your response, positive as well as negative. Each of us will take these ideas home to share with friends and colleagues and come up with new thoughts and ideas, which we urge you to communicate by letter, by fax, by E-Mail or any other available means. The wider the circle of respondents, the more numerous the participants, the better the chance that we will design a worthy plan of action. Together we shall weave a cloth of excellence, a joint creation providing a solid foundation for our endeavours.

Avraham Burg
Jerusalem
Sivan 5755 June 1995

Zionist campaign to divide and rule

Merry Christmas from JNF

Jerusalem Post, 29 December 1990

The Jewish National Fund (JNF) last week distributed Christmas trees to members of the country’s various Christian communities. More than 3,000 trees were handed out in Jerusalem, and over 7,000 in the north, including Nazareth and Shfaram. The trees were culled from various forests as part of JNF’s ongoing maintenance program. 

World Zionist Organisation supports illegal settlements

In the following article, Jewish and Zionist officials contrive not to have known that the WZO has supported illegal settlements in the occupied territories.  This is belied by news published previously in Israel.

In the Jerusalem Post of 8 August 1992 (byline Betsheva Tsur), the Post reports under the heading "WZO Congress backs Rabin’s settlement policies": 

"The World Zionist Organization will refocus its settlement activities to reflect the policies of the Rabin government, WZO officials said Friday, after the 32th Zionist Congress passed a resolution to direct the WZO’s settlement budget to sparsely populated areas important for the nation’s security. WZO officials said that the organization will shift its work almost exclusively to the Golan Heights and the Jordan Valley."

[…] The opening ceremony was attended by President Chaim Herzog, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and other cabinet ministers, Mayor Teddy Kollek and numerous ambassadors, along with more than 700 delegates and Jewish leaders…Former Australian premier Bob Hawke…was guest of honor."

Jewish Officials Profess Shock Over Report on Zionist Body

Embarrassed leaders of American Jewish organizations were absorbing the news this week that an international body under their control was at the center of a tangled Israeli scheme, detailed in a bombshell government report, to build illegal settlement outposts in violation of Israeli law, policy and international commitments.

The international body, the World Zionist Organization, or WZO, is described in the report as a pivotal player in the scheme, in which midlevel officials in various government ministries secretly channeled funds and resources to the illegal West Bank outposts. Several sources told the Forward that a WZO department, the Settlement Division, was used as a vehicle for many of the illegal activities, in part because its status as a nongovernmental organization shielded it from government oversight.

The controversial report, commissioned last year by Prime Minister Sharon, was submitted March 9. The Cabinet approved it March 13. The author, Talia Sasson, formerly Israel’s chief criminal prosecutor, paints a scathing picture of government and WZO officials who diverted funds, confiscated land ? including privately owned Palestinian land ? or turned a blind eye to "blatantly illegal" activity. Sasson said the illegal outposts began in the mid-1990s in response to a freeze on legal settlement construction by late prime minister Yitzhak Rabin.

The report has caused a furor in Israel. The Sharon government, which is obligated to freeze settlement building under President Bush’s road map to peace, promised to remove the outposts built since 2001 but largely failed to do so. Doves said the report proved the government was effectively abetting the illegal activity, while hawks said the role of government agencies proved the activity was not illegal.

WZO is a confederation of pro-Israel groups in dozens of countries, including such mainstays as Hadassah, B’nai B’rith and offshoots of the Reform and Conservative movements. American groups control 30% of the organization’s main governing bodies, including the World Zionist Congress, which is convened in Jerusalem every four years.

Most leaders of American Zionist groups said they had been unaware of the extent of WZO’s work in the territories. "If it were in the documents, there would have been big fights," said Rabbi Ammiel Hirsch, former director of the Association of Reform Zionists of America. "We wouldn’t have let that slide."

Others said American and world Jewish leaders simply failed to respond to mounting evidence. "This was hardly discussed, and everyone could have done a lot more," said Moshe Kagan of the left-wing Meretz USA, a former member of WZO’s 24-person executive committee. "Not enough was done, not by Meretz and not by anyone else."

Theodor Herzl founded the World Zionist Organization in 1897 to spearhead the creation of a Jewish state. Its Israeli operating arm, the Jewish Agency, essentially provided Israel’s governmental infrastructure when the state was declared in 1948. After independence, the world organization pursued tasks such as immigration, Jewish education and Israeli rural development.

Following the 1967 Six-Day War, WZO and the Jewish Agency were "reconstituted" as separate entities, with WZO retaining its ideological mission to Diaspora Jews as well as its tradition of raucous political debate. The Jewish Agency took over Israeli social services, currently a $420 million network of programs funded by Diaspora philanthropies.

The two bodies remain closely linked, sharing top staff and some joint facilities. The agency largely funds WZO’s $11 million budget.

Crucially, the post-1967 restructuring also split up the organization’s rural development operations. The Jewish Agency oversaw projects in Israel, while WZO took charge of settlement in the territories seized in the 1967 war.

Officials say they are careful not to use American donations to fund WZO activities in the territories, in order to avoid violations of U.S. policy that could compromise the tax-exempt status of U.S. Jewish charities.

Over time, the WZO Settlement Division became a semi-independent unit financed with Israeli government funds, currently $40 million a year. WZO governing bodies do not review the division budget, which is under the purview of the state comptroller, officials said.

The lines between WZO and the Jewish Agency are not always clear, however. While Settlement Division activities are funded by the government, the infrastructure of WZO is funded largely by the Jewish Agency, which in turn is funded by American Jewish federations.

The Settlement Division’s work in the territories was originally a topic of WZO debate. At the 1982 World Zionist Congress, a resolution to end the WZO’s role in settlements was narrowly defeated in a procedural maneuver by WZO’s Likud-appointed chairman. Soon afterward, Ariel Sharon, who had been forced to resign as defense minister after the 1982 Lebanon War, was nominated to head the division, but was rejected because liberal delegates feared he would override oversight rules.

In the mid-1980s, however, feuding over religious pluralism eclipsed debate over settlements. Delegate elections to the World Zionist Congress in 1987 saw the entry for the first time of a slate representing Reform Judaism, which swept the American balloting that year.

According to Rabbi Eric Yoffie, founding director of the Reform Zionist group and now president of the Union for Reform Judaism, debate over settlements dissipated during the 1980s, in part because it became clear that the Israeli government was calling the shots. "At a certain point, people saw this was not going to be resolved in the WZO, so there was just no purpose to further debates," Yoffie said.

In recent years, evidence has mounted implicating the Settlement Division in dubious activities. Numerous reports by the Israeli Peace Now organization detailed the web of agencies building outposts. In January, a Knesset committee discussed WZO’s role in illegal outposts.

"If people didn’t suspect this on some basic level, there was something wrong with them," said Jamie Levin, director of the Labor Zionist Alliance, now known as Ameinu.

The publication of the Sasson report has reignited WZO debate over the Settlement Division. A day after the report’s release, 12 members of WZO’s executive committee wrote a letter to Sallai Meridor, who chairs both WZO and the Jewish Agency, calling for an "extraordinary meeting" to discuss the report.

Sasson recommended that the government cut the Settlement Division’s funding and end its role in the territories. Two members of the WZO executive committee wrote a separate letter calling for these recommendations to be implemented immediately, despite a call by Sharon for the division to remain intact.

Leaders of right-wing American groups, who tend to support West Bank settlements in principle, expressed less concern about the Sasson findings. Mandell Ganchrow, director of Mizrachi Religious Zionists of America, said he saw no need for immediate change: "This will have to be dealt with by the government. It’s not fair to point a finger and ask where was the WZO. This had to do with the will of the government of the State of Israel."

Michael Jankelowitz, spokesman for both the Jewish Agency and the World Zionist Organization, said WZO never raised concerns about the work of the Settlement Division, because it was always done under government direction: "Everything we did was at the behest of the government. We were not aware that these requests were illegal."

Zionist Congress resolution: Demand to outlaw anti-Zionism

The Zionist Congress hereby resolves:
[…]

4. To establish, where necessary in every country, working groups which will work with members of the legislature to bring about legislation that will outlaw anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism and Holocaust denial;

5. To form groups of jurists whose role would be to lodge complaints and initiate prosecution against political, media, or other bodies which disseminate anti-Semitic and anti-Zionist hatred;

 

The Struggle Against Anti-Zionism, Anti-Semitism and Racism


34th Zionist Congress Resolutions

35. Training Shlichim to Deal With Expressions of Anti-Semitism 36. The Struggle Against Anti-Zionism, Anti-Semitism and Racism

35. Training Shlichim to Deal With Expressions of Anti-Semitism

Whereas the current situation has led to a dramatic increase in expressions of anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism on campus be it resolved that:

we call upon the World Zionist Organization to undertake whatever steps are necessary to ensure that Shlichim are fully and properly trained to deal with these issues in a manner consistent with the culture, history, and society of the country in which they will be serving.

36. The Struggle Against Anti-Zionism, Anti-Semitism and Racism

The Zionist Congress decries the re-emergence of the scourge of anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism in many countries of the world, especially in Europe, which, only two generations ago, gave rise to the horror of the Holocaust.

The Zionist Congress notes with concern the recently new anti-Semitic and anti-Zionist phenomenon among various groups has been added to the campaign of delegitimization and vilification of, and incitement and terrorism against the State of Israel.

The Zionist Congress is distressed that 54 years after the establishment of the State of Israel, that criminal acts associated with anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism are reemerging in new and especially violent ways;

The Zionist Congress calls upon all persons of conscience throughout the world to voice their vehement opposition to a renewal of anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism currently rearing its ugly head;

The Zionist Congress calls upon civilized persons everywhere to disassociate themselves from and to condemn those elements in their midst disseminating these pernicious racial views;

The Zionist Congress calls upon all governments, parliaments, and international bodies of the world to effect legislation against this phenomenon, rendering illegal and subjecting anyone practicing such acts to prosecution and punishment.

This Zionist Congress notes and condemns the United Nations Conference Against Racism held in Durban in August 2001, as it became a forum for vitriolic anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism. This Congress, therefore, calls upon the United Nations to insure that such a phenomenon is not repeated within any United Nations forums or bodies.

The Zionist Congress hereby resolves:

1. That the Zionist Federations urge all Jewish communities throughout the world to act vigorously against the scourge of anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism; and

2. Calls upon the Executive of the Jewish Agency to establish a professional team, based in Jerusalem, to coordinate the fight against anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism in an active and dignified way;

3. To set up groups of experts who will work with opinion makers, the communications media (press, radio, and television) and intellectuals to combat the scourge of anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism currently widespread in some of these circles and put forward positive, constant, and proactive information about Israel;

4. To establish, where necessary in every country, working groups which will work with members of the legislature to bring about legislation that will outlaw anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism and Holocaust denial;

5. To form groups of jurists whose role would be to lodge complaints and initiate prosecution against political, media, or other bodies which disseminate anti-Semitic and anti-Zionist hatred;

6. To establish, in conjunction with the World Union of Jewish Students and other Jewish student Zionist organizations, an apparatus to monitor anti-Semitic and anti-Zionist activity on the college campuses and to expose the disseminators of hate propaganda, and to provide students of all ages with information and strategies to respond to anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism on and off college campuses;

7. To form groups of educators who will carry out an extensive and probing examination of textbooks, dictionaries, and encyclopedia, in order to expunge them of all anti-Semitic, anti-Zionist, and Holocaust-denial content;

8. To recruit ethical and moral persons, governments, and parliaments throughout the world in order to warn governments that have demonstrated weakness in combating anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism in their countries;

9. By carrying out these actions, the Zionist Movement, its organizations and members will struggle to achieve full cooperation and unity with global and national Diaspora Jewish organizations worldwide.

The Zionist Congress calls upon the Government of Israel to mobilize all its power to assist in realizing these activities and to strengthen its ties with the Jewish communities around the world in the spirit of the dictum that kol Yisrael aravim zeh Bazeh – all Jews are responsible for one another.

WZO Resolution: Klal Yisrael, Jewish Unity, and the Centrality of the State of Israel

Klal Yisrael, Jewish Unity, and the Centrality of the State of Israel


34th Zionist Congress Resolutions

47. Rewriting the Jerusalem Programme 48. Establishing an Operative Zionist Program Relevant to the Present Time 49. Strengthening Identification with the State of Israel 50. One Hundred Year Anniversary of the Establishment of Religious Zionism ? The Mizrachi Movement 51. Hasbara 52. Jerusalem 53. Zionism in Israel 54. Pardon for Jonathan Pollard 55. Solidarity

47. Rewriting the Jerusalem Programme In light of the fact that some sections of the Jerusalem Programme of June 1969 are not realistic or relevant,

the Zionist Congress resolves that the Presidium of the Zionist General Council and the Zionist Executive form a committee, composed of representatives of all factions and viewpoints within the Zionist Movement, in order to reevaluate and consider updating the Jerusalem Programme in the Jewish year 5762.

48. Establishing an Operative Zionist Program Relevant to the Present Time

The 34th Zionist Congress instructs the Zionist Executive to present an operative Zionist program valid for our present-day reality, and to work toward the expansion of the spheres of influence among the Jews of the Diaspora, with special emphasis on activity with students and young people.

49. Strengthening Identification with the State of Israel

The Zionist Movement, from its outset, regards the responsibility for all of Israel and the unity of Israel as a great and necessary foundation for the reinforcement of identification with, and obligation to, the Jewish State of Israel. On the basis of the activity of the Zionist Executive,

the 34th Zionist Congress currently resolves to instruct the Zionist Executive to prepare: a. a strategic worldwide program for the reinforcement and deepening of Jewish solidarity in general, and with the State of Israel in particular, b. an operative program for the cultivation and deepening of the connections between the spiritual, communal and organization leadership of all streams in the Diaspora, and the leadership and society in Israel, c. the Center for Religious Affairs in the Diaspora of the World Zionist Organization is regarded as an important and meaningful factor in the cultivation of the consciousness of Jewish belonging and identification, as well as obligation to the State of Israel.

50. One Hundred Year Anniversary of the Establishment of Religious Zionism ? The Mizrachi Movement

The 34th Zionist Congress of 2002 marks the one hundred years since the establishment of the Mizrachi Movement in the Jewish year 5662, as well as its joining the World Zionist Organization.

The Zionist Congress congratulates and praises the Mizrachi World Movement and all its branches for the nurturing and cultivation of generations of religious Zionists, Bnei Torah and activists, who are integrated in all fields of Zionist activity: in aliyah, settlement, religious Zionist education, security, science, creativity and social involvement.

51. Hasbara

Whereas the need for Hasbara and Zionist education has become increasingly critical over the past few years as anti-Zionist and anti-Semitic attacks have intensified, and as the ideology of post-Zionism has been promulgated, and

whereas knowledge of and commitment to Zionist principles cannot be assumed, particularly among the younger generation, and

whereas support for Israel has become increasingly tenuous among Jews and non-Jews alike in recent years, and

whereas those who oppose Israel have become increasingly vociferous and sophisticated in their anti-Zionist campaigning,

be it hereby resolved that the World Zionist Organization, through the Department for Zionist Activities, accept the mandate to actively engage in Hasbara and Zionist education, through the use of all modern technological means ? internet, television and radio ? in order to strengthen the Jewish and Israeli heritage, and

be it further resolved that a special committee be established immediately, which will decide on effective ways to implement this, after having consulted with the Department for Zionist Activities, and whereby the possibility of cooperation with the Jewish Agency should be considered.

be it further resolved that the budget of the World Zionist Organization should reflect the implementation of this decision.

52. Jerusalem

1. Jerusalem has always been a central focus of Zionism, the symbol of the Jewish People, and its spiritual and cultural center, and its historic capital, it is to her that the Jewish People continue to turn from all over the world.

2. The Zionist Movement firmly stands behind the demand of the Israeli government and of the Jewish People to safeguard the unity of Jerusalem as the capital city of Israel.

3. In order to strengthen Jerusalem as a symbol of the Jewish nation, the Zionist Congress attributes great importance to the channeling and encouragement of immigration to Jerusalem.

4. Jerusalem is an important center for the higher education of the Jewish people, including the Hebrew University as well as other academic institutions of higher learning, and secular and religious educational institutions on a high level, in the fields of the arts and different occupational fields. The effort will continue to direct Jewish youth to come and receive education for a period of time in Jerusalem, to encourage the participation of Jewish students in academic studies at the Hebrew University and in different colleges and yeshivot in Jerusalem.

5. The Zionist Congress calls upon the Jewish public throughout the world to continue to come to Jerusalem as tourists and visitors, and especially visits to Jerusalem by young people and students, despite the security problems. Visits of this kind are an important layer in the continuing existence of the Jewish People.

6. It is necessary to continue the effort to strengthen Jerusalem’s economy in those areas special to her, among them tourism, medicine, hi-technology, culture, higher education, government, National Institutions, and to expand infrastructures and the support of the channeling of special encouragement given on behalf of the Jewish People and the State, to Jerusalem.

53. Zionism in Israel 1. The Zionist Movement regards the Law of Return and its protection as a treasure of eternal value, which should not be changed, and the status of which should not be harmed.

2. The Zionist Congress calls upon the Ministry of Education to increase education toward a Jewish Zionist identity and toward love of the land, and toward the values of Jewish culture and heritage, by preparing appropriate programmes for schools and increasing the amount of teaching hours allocated to this subject at schools.

3. The Zionist Congress calls upon the national institutions to awaken and push forward Zionist activity in Israel, and to cultivate bodies that are dealing with Zionist thinking and activity, so as to help create a Zionist atmosphere in Israel.

4. The Zionist Congress calls upon all National Institutions to make efforts and help strengthen the connection between Israeli society and the Jewish People and the Jewish communities abroad, by means of aiding organizations and institutions world wide, and other youth movements, women’s movements, student organizations and schools, through activities that focus upon the subject of the Jewish People.

5. The Zionist Congress calls upon the Government of Israel to consider as important, and as their responsibility, to aid the Jewish communities as part of the mutual guarantee between Israel and the Diaspora.

54. Pardon for Jonathan Pollard

The 34th Zionist Congress:

Calls upon the President of the United States, Mr. George W. Bush, to pardon Jonathan Pollard and free him;

Calls upon all Jewish and Zionist activists in the world, and in particular in the United States, to participate in the activities to free Jonathan Pollard from continued imprisonment;

Charges the Zionist General Council to adopt a plan of action to achieve the freedom of Jonathan Pollard. Such plan shall include educational and supporting activities.

55. Solidarity

Whereas murderous terror and terrorist attacks are being carried out constantly against the citizens of Israel by cowardly murderers;

And whereas a slanderous propaganda system is aiming to delegitimize the State of Israel and slander it;

And whereas a sharp wave of anti-Semitism wave is taking place, in its most violent and propagandist forms;

Therefore we are declaring again the supreme value of the mutual guarantee and responsibility between each and every Jew, each and every community and between the State of Israel and the Diaspora. Jewish solidarity is an existential asset for assuring the well being of our people and its future;

The Zionist Congress expresses its gratitude and appreciation towards the expressions of solidarity with Israel, which we have seen during the last year amongst many Jews worldwide.

The World Zionist Organization, in its national and global frameworks, and the delegates of the 34th Zionist Congress, will lead the campaign for Israel and against terror and anti-Semitism once they are back in their countries, by initiating and participating in:

a. Rallies to support Israel and oppose terror b. Activities against anti-Semitism world wide c. Follow-up of unfair media coverage d. Persuasion and explanation operations in front of parliaments and governments e. Organization of solidarity missions to Israel f. The Israel Emergency Campaign g. Recruitment of supporters within the non-Jewish public, against anti-Semitism and terror and in favor of the State of Israel

The Congress salutes our friends, people with conscience and moral values, who oppose the anti-Semitism that is rearing its ugly head.

Zionist Congress Resolution: Renewing Covenant between State of Israel and WZO

 
H
 

State of Israel partner of world Jewry

November 20, 2002
15 Kislev, 5763
Jerusalem
 

Director General of the Prime Ministers Office: " World Wide Jewry is a Strategic Asset for the State of Israel and Strengthening its Security

Director General of the Prime Ministers Office, Avigdor Yitzhaki, issued a directive to cabinet ministers and Directors General of ministries declaring that he wishes to continue and deepen the partnership with World Jewry in the fields in which the Jewish Agency operates.

"World Jewry has proven time and time again that it constitutes a strategic asset in building the country and strengthening its security. Even now during the present crisis, World Jewry has come forth in helping Israel with the Israel Emergency Campaign, solidarity missions, most important thousand of immigrants who continue to arrive. The goals of this government revolve around issues of Aliyah, absorption, and deepening Jewish Identity and Jewish Zionist and strengthening bonds and partnerships with Jewish Communities for the building of the State of Israel", the Director General wrote.

In addition, Director General said "the Government’s work with Diaspora Jewry takes place by the Prime Ministers office in cooperation the Jewish Agency in accordance with the 1979 Convention between the Government of Israel and the Jewish Agency and the Jewish Agency Status law. We in the Prime Ministers Office will continue in this approach and will stress the same goals (increasing Aliyah, strengthening absorption, and Jewish and Zionist education)."

Jewish Agency Chairman, Sallai Meridor said, "the importance of Diaspora Jewry is especially great at this juncture. The encouragement and the support that Israel gets from Jewish communities all over the world is testimony to the fact the World Jewry supports us. The Government of Israeli is a partner with the Jewish Agency in achieving these high goals."

The annual "General Assembly" of the United Jewish Communities, has opened in Philadelphia, under the banner Justice, Justice, you will pursue" with the active participation of the Jewish Agency. During the GA, the following subjects will be discussed: the demographic changes in the Jewish communities, the relationship between the Jewish Federations and the State of Israel, the Israel Emergency Campaign, and worldwide anti-Semitism.

For additional information please contact the Office of the Spokesman:
Yehuda Weinraub
Liaison to Foreign Press and Media
Jewish Agency for Israel
Mobile:972-53-927017
Fax: 972-2-6204013

The World Zionist Organization: Structure and Functions

http://www.thelikud.org/Archives/Structure%20of%20the%20World%20Zionist%20Organization.htm

The World Zionist Organization
The National Institutions
Structure and Functions

Table of Contents

*    Forward
*    Introduction
*    Turning points in the activities of the World Zionist Organization
*    Stages in the history of the Congresses
*    The Institutions of the Zionist Movement
*    The Zionist Congress
*    The Zionist General Council
*    The Presidium of the Zionist General Council
*    The Executive of the World Zionist Organization
*    The Zionist Federations
*    The Judicial Bodies
*    The Zionist Supreme Court
*    Attorney of the World Zionist Organization
*    The Comptroller of the World Zionist Organization
*    The Zionist Archives
*    Zionist Bodies set up following decisions of the Zionist Congresses
*    The World Zionist Organization
*    The Jewish Colonial Trust
*    Keren kayemeth Le’lsrael (Jewish National Fund)
*    Keren Hayesod – United Israel Appeal
*    The Jewish Agency for Israel
*    The Jewish Agency for Israel
*    The Joint Authority for Jewish Zionist Education

    Appendixes
*    List of the Zionist Congresses
*    Presidents of the World Zionist Organization
*    Chairmen of the Zionist General Council
*    Chairmen of the Zionist Executive
*    Chairmen of the Jewish Agency Board of Governors
*    World Chairmen of KKL-JNF
*    Keren Hayesod – United Israel Appeal
*    Managing Directors, Presidents, Presidium, Chairmen
*    The Basel Program
*    The Jerusalem Program, 1951
*    The Revised Jerusalem Program of 1968
*    The Duties of the Individual Zionist
*    The World Zionist Organization and Jewish Agency for Israel (Status) Law
*    Covenant between the Government of Israel and the World Zionist Organization
*    Covenant between the Government of Israel and the Jewish Agency for Israel
*    Agreement for the Reconstitution of the Jewish Agency for Israel
*    Report to the Board of Governors of the Jewish Agency for Israel on the creation of a Joint Authority for Jewish-Zionist Education as amended by the Jewish Agency Assembly, June28 1990
*    Covenant made between the State of Israel and Keren kayemeth Le’Israel

To mark the centennial of the First Zionist Congress held in  Basel and the founding of the World Zionist Organization there, and in wake of the Government decision to declare 1996-97 as the “Year of Zionism”, the Department of Organization and Community Relations and the Secretariat of the Zionist General Council have promoted the publication of this booklet. This publication presents the processes in the organizational development of the World Zionist Organization, including the other National Institutions: The Jewish Agency for Israel, Keren Kayemeth LeIsrael (Jewish National Fund) and Keren Hayesod.

We hope that study of this publication will contribute to an understanding of the processes related to the activities of the National Institutions, from the time of their establishment until the present day.

We have seen fit to distribute this work among the various bodies in the State of Israel and the Diaspora which are connected with the activity of the National Institutions and which will take part in a variety of programs related to the Year of Zionism events.

Rami Komblum
Secretary of the Zionist General Council

Introduction
The World Zionist Organization constitutes the organizational arm of the Zionist Movement. The bulk of its work is in the Diaspora, where it seeks to preserve and strengthen the Jewish people. All the Zionist Federations which accept the "Jerusalem Program" and the Constitution of the World Zionist Organization, the Zionist World Unions and the international Jewish organizations are members of the World Zionist Organization.
The supreme organ and the legislative authority of the World Zionist Organization is the Zionist Congress which convenes once every four years. In pursuance of the Constitution of the World Zionist Organization, elections are held prior to the Congress in all the countries, except for Israel, where the representation is determined in accordance with the relative strength of the Zionist parties in the last Knesset elected prior to the opening of the Congress.

The Congress elects the office-holders of the World Zionist Organization, who are: the Chairman of the Zionist Executive, the Zionist Executive, the Zionist General Council, the President of the Zionist Supreme Court, the World Zionist Organization Attorney and the Comptroller.
The Zionist General Council, elected by the Zionist Congress, considers and decides upon all matters relating to the World Zionist Organization and its institutions in the inter-Congress period. In so far as is necessary, it decides upon the manner in which the Executive will implement the decisions of the Congress and the Council.

In general, one Session is held yearly. In exceptional cases, the Zionist General Council resolves on the holding of an additional Session.
The Presidium of the Zionist General Council is elected by the Zionist General Council. The Presidium meets approximately once monthly, and its role is to determine, in consultation with the Executive, the date of the Zionist General Council Sessions. The Presidium represents the Zionist General Council and is empowered by the Zionist General Council to deal with matters transmitted to it by the Zionist Congress or the Zionist General Council.

The Zionist Executive constitutes the executive institution of the World Zionist Organization. It is charged with the implementation of the decisions of the Congress and of the Zionist General Council, through its Departments.

The policy of the World Zionist Organization is implemented by the territorial Zionist Federations, which constitute roof organizations and are made up of the World Unions (the Zionist groupings) and of the international Jewish organizations. The Department of Organization and Community Relations is responsible for their functioning.

The following institutions were established by decisions of Zionist Congresses: in 1897 the World Zionist Organization was founded, in 1899 "the Jewish Colonial Trust" which served as a financial tool for realization of the idea of a Jewish State; in 1901 the Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel (Jewish National Fund) was created for buying land in Eretz Israel. The Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel engages in afforestation, in preparation of land for agriculture and in nurturing of the environment and of society. In 1920 Keren Hayesod – United Israel Appeal was formed. This institution deals with funding of Aliyah, absorption and settlement.

The Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI) was established in 1929, by the Sixteenth Congress, in consequence of the conclusion reached by the leadership of the World Zionist Organization as to the need to mobilize the Jewish people for fulfillment of the goals of the Zionist Movement. The decision to found the JAFI was taken at the Sixteenth Zionist Congress. The Six-Day War led to a change in the mutual relations between Israel and the Diaspora. The Israel Appeals grew stronger and the contributors wished to assume a part in the responsibility for the Jewish Agency activities. In 1971, an agreement was signed for expansion of the Jewish Agency. By virtue of this agreement, the Jewish Agency is made up of 50% of representatives of the World Zionist Organization, 30% of representatives of the United Appeal and 20% of representatives of Keren Hayesod.

The Board of Governors of the Jewish Agency is the organ which determines its policy. It convenes three times yearly.
The Joint Authority for Jewish-Zionist Education was established in 1991. The Joint Authority is made up of three professional Departments: the Department of Torah Education and Culture in the Diaspora, the Department of Jewish Education and Culture in the Diaspora, and the Department of Youth and Hechalutz and Informal Education. Its main activity focuses on three fields: 1. "The Israel Experience" – bringing young people to Israel in order to shape their Jewish identity; 2. Training and development of manpower in education; 3. Study prand study material.

Turning Points in the Activities of The World Zionist Organization

The World Zionist Organization, which was founded at the First Zionist Congress in Basel in 1897 (Appendix 9), was the main instrument of the Jewish people on the road to the establishment of the State of Israel. Until the establishment of the State, the Zionist Executive acted as the "government in the making". It worked for the rebirth of Jewish nationality within the Jewish people, and in the field of Aliyah and Jewish settlement in Eretz Israel. It also conducted an extensive information campaign among world statesmen in order to obtain political recognition for the Zionist aims. Its efforts led to the publication of the Balfour Declaration in 1917, in which the British Government expressed its sympathy for the Zionist aspiration regarding the establishment of a Jewish national home in Palestine, and to the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948.

In 1908, the World Zionist Organization opened its Palestine Office in Jaffa in order to develop the settlement work in Eretz Israel. Upon the outbreak of World War I, all the WZO activities in Palestine were suspended.
In 1915, a Zionist Coordination and Relations Office was established in Copenhagen, Denmark. Following the Balfour Declaration, the center of gravity of Zionist activity moved to London, where a World Zionist Conference was held in 1920.

In 1920, Prof. Chaim Weizmann was elected as the first President of the World Zionist Organization. At that time, a new direction was consolidated which constituted a combination of the political stream and the spiritual stream; it was called "Synthetic Zionism". At the same time questions of culture were being debated in the Zionist Movement. Some members demanded that emphasis be placed on spiritual Zionism and saw Eretz Israel as a spiritual center for the Jewish people. On the other hand, many of the religious Zionists demanded that cultural affairs be removed from the WZO fields of activity. In 1933, the Revisionists, headed by Zeev Jabotinsky, withdrew from the World Zionist Organization and founded the New Zionist Organization. In 1946 they returned to the World Zionist Organization, participating in the Twenty-Second Zionist Congress, held in Basel.

Since the establishment of the State, the activity of the Zionist Movement has concentrated mainly on the Diaspora, on strengthening the Jewish people in the fields of Zionist Jewish education, Aliyah promotion, Zionist information, and the struggle against assimilation. On the other hand, the main activities of the Jewish Agency are in the State of Israel. After the establishment of the State, the aims and tasks of the Zionist Movement were redefined. At the Twenty-Third Zionist Congress (1951), the first to convene in Jerusalem, the "Jerusalem Program" was adopted (Appendix 10). In 1952, the Knesset passed the World Zionist Organization and Jewish Agency for Israel (Status) Law (Appendix 13), which stipulates: "The State of Israel recognizes the World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency for Israel as the authorized agencies which will continue to operate in the State of Israel for the development and settlement of the country, the absorption of immigrants from the Diaspora and the coordination of the activities in Israel of Jewish institutions and organizations active in those fields." In 1954 a "Covenant" was signed between the Israeli Government and the Zionist Executive (Appendix 14). These two basic documents granted a special status to the World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency, which was established in 1929 (Appendixes 15 and 16).

The Twenty-Seventh Zionist Congress, which convened in Jerusalem in 1968, reformulated the "Jerusalem Program" (Appendix 11), establishing the aims of Zionism as the unity of the Jewish people and the centrality of the State of Israel, the strengthening of the State of Israel, and the preservation of the unique character of the Jewish people through fostering of Jewish education.

In 1972 the Twenty-Eighth Zionist Congress approved and adopted the Duties of the Individual Zionist. These obligations stem from the tasks embraced by the "Jerusalem Program" as well as from membership in the World Zionist Organization (Appendix 12).

In 1992, the Thirty-Second Zionist Congress decided on the forming of a committee to examine the structure of the World Zionist Organization, in order to adapt its functioning to the needs of the times.

Stages in the History of the Congresses (Appendix 2)

The Herzl period from 1897 to 1903, from the First Congress to the Sixth. These Congresses engaged in ideological debates and clarification of the organization, the regulations, the method of electing the Executive and shaping of the image of the World Zionist Organization.

From Herzl’s death until World War I ,1905 to 1913 – from the Seventh Congress to the Eleventh Congress, the discussions were mainly at the practical level and in the field of Jewish culture in the countries of the Diaspora. Debates of principle were held between the supporters of Political Zionism (Herzl, Pinsker) and the advocates of Spiritual Zionism (Ahad Ha-Am).

From 1913 until 1921 no Zionist Congresses were held as a result of World War I. In 1917 the Balfour Declaration was published.

After the Balfour Declaration until the establishment of the State of Israel, 1921 to 1946: from the Twelfth Congress until the Twenty-Second Congress, the World Zionist Organization attained international recognition as a result of the Balfour Declaration, and consequently the status of the Congress was modified. These Congresses dealt with political problems that arose in Palestine and the Diaspora. Most of the discussions and decisions focused on the following issues: settlement of Palestine, creation of Keren Hayesod, acquisition of the lands of the Jezreel Valley, opening of the Hebrew University, the economic crisis and the Fourth Aliyah crisis. The Eighteenth and Nineteenth Congresses (1933 and 1935) were held in the shadow of the Nazi rise to power in Germany. The Twentieth Congress (1937) discussed the Palestine Partition Plan prepared by the Peel Commission, and the Twenty-First Congress (1939) discussed the struggle against the British White Paper. The Twenty-Second Congress (1946), held after the Holocaust, discussed "illegal" immigration and the fight against British rule. A resolution was adopted on the importance and the need for the immediate establishment of a Jewish state.

After the establishment of the State of Israel – since the Twenty-Third Congress (1951) the Congresses have been held in the State of Israel. The Twenty-Third Congress resolved to adopt the "Jerusalem Program" (Appendix 10) instead of the "Basel Program" (Appendix 9). A decision was adopted calling on the State of Israel to grant official status to the World Zionist Organization. In 1952 the Knesset approved the "World Zionist Organization and Jewish Agency for Israel (Status) Law" (Appendix 13).

At the Twenty-Seventh Zionist Congress (1968) the reformulation of the "Jerusalem Program" was approved, with emphasis on the unity of the Jewish people and the centrality and strengthening of the State of Israel. At the XXXI/5 Zionist General Council Session, held in June 1991 (Sivan 5751), an amendment was introduced into the "Jerusalem Program", whereby Zionist education would also be fostered. At the Twenty-Eighth Congress the "Duties of the Individual Zionist" were laid down.

Location of the Zionist Congresses:
Prior to the establishment of the State of Israel, the Congresses were held in Basel, London, Hamburg, Vienna, Carlsbad, Zurich, Lucerne and Geneva. Since the establishment of the State all the Congresses have been held in Jerusalem.

The Institutions of the Zionist Movement
The Zionist Movement is the only democratic world Jewish organization. Its institutions are elected by democratic processes.
Its institutions are:

1.    Zionist Congress
2.    Zionist General Council
3.    Zionist Executive
4.    Zionist Supreme Court
5.    Office of the Attorney
6.    World Zionist Organization Comptroller
7.    Zionist Archives

 THE ZIONIST CONGRESS
The Zionist Congress is the supreme organ of the World Zionist Organization and its legislative authority. Article 13 of the WZO Constitution stipulates: "An Ordinary Congress shall meet at least once in four years at a place and time determined by the Council. It shall be convened by the Executive." Notwithstanding, the Constitution allows postponement of the Congress for special reasons, and subject to a vote. Accordingly, the last few Congresses were held approximately every five years. It should be noted that the first five Zionist Congresses were held annually (Appendix 2).

Language of the Congress
The official language of the initial Congresses was German. Since the 1940’s, Hebrew, English, French and Spanish have been the main languages at the Congresses, but the official language has been Hebrew. Until the Nineteenth Congress, the Proceedings were published in German. From the Twentieth Congress onwards they have been published in Hebrew only.

Powers of the Congress

1.    The Congress elects the Chairman of the Zionist Executive, the members of the Executive, the members of the Zionist General Council and their deputies, the President of the Zionist Supreme Court, the Attorney of the World Zionist Organization and the Comptroller.
2.    The Congress receives and considers the reports of the Zionist Executive and of the Institutions of the World Zionist Organization.
3.    The Congress receives and decides on the report of the Comptroller.
4.    The Congress considers, in its committees, proposals brought before the Congress by the members of the Zionist General Council, the members of the Zionist Executive and the Zionist Federations. The conclusions of the committees are put to the vote in the plenary of the Congress.
5.    The Congress draws up the policy of the World Zionist Organization including the financial policy, and elects the Institutions of the movement.

In the inter-Congress period many of the Congress powers are assumed by the Zionist General Council, including the authority to amend the Constitution.

Duration of the Congress
Congresses have generally lasted 9-10 days. However, there have also been longer Congresses, such as the Twentieth Congress which lasted 19 days and the Twenty-Fifth Congress which lasted 15 days. The Thirty-First Congress and the Thirty-Second Congresses each lasted only five days.

Composition of the Congress
In pursuance of Article 17, Section 1 of the WZO Constitution, the number of delegates to Congress, apart from those elected on World Election Lists, will not exceed 500. In pursuance of Section 2 of the same Article, the Zionist General Council may resolve, not later than one year before Congress meets, to increase this number by not more than 5%. In pursuance of Section 3, the number of delegates to Congress will be allocated in the following proportion: Israel 38%, United States of America 29%, other countries of the Diaspora 33%.

In the case of countries of the Diaspora, an overall number is given, but the number of delegates of each country is determined, prior to each Congress, by a special Committee, which takes into account in its decisions the size of the Jewish population and all the Zionist achievements in each country, such as the number of Federation members, Aliyah, Appeals and Jewish education.

The Shekel and Zionist Membership
The Zionist Shekel constituted a personal membership certificate in the World Zionist Organization and was proof of payment of membership fees. Paying of the Shekel was a condition for the right to vote and eligibility for election to the Zionist Congress. The Shekel was introduced at the First Zionist Congress. After the establishment of the State of Israel, the Shekel was abolished, and instead it was determined that the elections to the Zionist Congress would be held according to a personal census of the members of the Zionist Federations. An official resolution to this effect was adopted at the Twenty-Seventh Congress in 1968, but in fact the Shekel was abolished even prior to this.

In pursuance of Article 22, Sections 1 and 2 of the Constitution, every Jew who is a member of a body affiliated to the World Zionist Organization and who has reached the age of eighteen years, is entitled to vote and to be elected to the Congress. The elections are obligatory for all the electoral areas except for Israel. In pursuance of Article 21 Section 1 of the Constitution, no elections are held in Israel. The Committee for Determining the Representation from Israel appoints the delegates in accordance with the relative strength of the Zionist parties in the last Knesset elected prior to the opening of the Congress.

In 1976 election rules were issued that are binding on all the countries. The rules allow several kinds of elections: personal or proportional elections, voting in a poll booth, postal vote etc. The elections must be by vote unless a "one hundred percent agreement" has been obtained, namely there exists only one list accepted by all the parties and the streams or by the candidates. In this case it should be known that even if an agreement was reached, any new group formed, even temporarily, can cancel the agreement if it succeeds in mobilizing the number of signatures required for presentation of a list.

Membership of organizations in the World Zionist organization

Since the new WZO Constitution came into force in 1960, there has been no personal membership in the World Zionist Organization. Only organizations can be members. An individual Zionist can belong to the World Zionist Organization only indirectly, through one of the member organizations.

As indicated above, in the period of the Shekel, membership was individual; anyone paying a shekel was considered a member of the World Zionist Organization. The reason for this difference lies in the change in the structure of the World Zionist Organization, which is now an "association of organizations". This change was introduced in order to take into account the laws of the USA in relation to foreign agents.

The Central Elections Board

The Chairman of the Central Elections Board and the members of the board are appointed by the President of the Zionist Supreme Court. The board is chaired by a judge or judge emeritus in Israel. Factions which participated in the previous Zionist Congress participate in the board as observers. In addition to the board’s powers, it deliberates and decides in cases where omissions were discovered in the election preparations or a deadlock situation was created.

The Area Election Committee

The Area Election Committee determines the method of elections and the conduct of the elections in each area/country. If all the organizations and groups operating in the Zionist movement in a country are represented in the Executive of the Zionist Federation, the Executive of the Federation can serve as the Area Election Committee. If the Federation prefers that a special body conduct the elections, it will establish this body. The committee must reflect the composition of the delegation of the electoral area in question at the previous Zionist Congress.
A body which was not represented at the previous Congress but presented a list of candidates is entitled to one delegate in an advisory capacity on the committee. In a country where an Area Election Committee was not established, the Central Elections Board will appoint an Area Election Committee.

Elections to the Congress must be held no later than three months prior to holding of the Congress.

The Zionist World Unions

"Zionist World Union" means a Zionist organization which represents a special ideological point of view within the World Zionist Organization, has branches in at least 5 countries and is represented by a Congress Grouping.

The Zionist World Unions are:

1.    The Labor Zionist Movement
2.    Likud (Herut Hatzohar and the World Union of General Zionists)
3.    Mizrachi-Hapoel Hamizrachi
4.    The World Confederation of United Zionists, which in the USA is a federation of "Hadassah", the American Jewish League and Bnei Zion.
5.    Arzenu – The Zionist faction of the Reform Movement.
6.    Mercaz – the Zionist faction of the Conservative Movement.
7.    Mapam.
8.    Tnuat H- Hanoar Hazioni, Shinuy, Ratz
9.    Banai (Tehiya, Tzomet)

The International Jewish Organizations
Since the Twenty-Eighth Zionist Congress (1972), international Jewish organizations are represented in the Zionist Congress, provided that they accept the Jerusalem Program, even if not all their members are declared Zionists (unlike the World Unions in which every member must be a declared Zionist). These bodies have limited voting rights -they do not vote on matters of candidature. The international Jewish organizations are:

1.    WIZO*
2.    The World Sephardi Federation
3.    B’nai B’rith International
4.    Maccabi World Union
5.    The Student Delegation
6.    The CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States) Delegation
7.    The World Conference of Synagogues and Kehiloth (Orthodox)
8.    The World Council of Synagogues (Conservative)
9.    The World Union for Progressive Judaism (Reform)
10.    The Zionist Council in Israel**

* WIZO is an international, non-party Zionist body which receives, by virtue of an agreement entered into in 1964, global representation like all the other bodies with limited voting rights. However, WIZO has unlimited voting rights like the World Unions.

** The Zionist Council in Israel – This body represents Zionist bodies in Israel which are not represented in the Knesset. Since it was decided to add 10 additional delegates to the Israeli delegation, the Zionist General Council decided that these delegates would be from the Zionist Council in Israel.
 
Composition of the Thirty-Second Zionist Congress (July 1992).

Distribution of the delegates at the Thirty-Second Zionist Congress:
Representatives of the Zionist World Unions and WIZO with full voting rights – 585 delegates:
Labor Zionist Movement: 130 delegates
Likud: 134 delegates
World Confederation of United Zionists: 79 delegates
Mizrachi-Hapoel Hamizrachi: 71 delegates
Arzenu: 46 delegates
Mercaz: 27 delegates
Mapam: 27 delegates
Tnuat Hamercaz-Hanoar Hazioni-Shinuy-Ratz: 23 delegates
Tzomet: 14 delegates
Moledet: 5 delegates
Hatehiya: 3 delegates
Unaffiliated: 2 delegates
WIZO: 24 delegates
Representatives of the international Jewish organizations and bodies with voting rights except for voting on matters of candidature – 136 delegates:
World Sephardi Federation: 24 delegates
B’nai B’rith International: 20 delegates
Maccabi World Union: 17 delegates
Students Delegation: 20 delegates
World Conference of Synagogues and Kehiloth (Orthodox): 15 delegates
World Council of Synagogues (Conservative): 15 delegates
World Union for Progressive Judaism (Reform): 15 delegates
The Zionist Council in Israel: 10 delegates

These delegates are appointed by the body which they represent and the size of their delegation is fixed in agreements between the Zionist Executive and the executive of the organizations, with the approval of the Zionist General Council.

Creation of a Grouping at the Congress

In addition to the Groupings participating in the elections to the Congress, and whose representatives participate in the Congress in accordance with their relative strength, in pursuance of Article 25A of the Constitution, at least 12 delegates present at the Congress may form a Congress Grouping. A delegate may join only one Congress Grouping.

Participants in Congress in an Advisory Capacity and Observers.

In addition to the delegates with full voting rights participating in Congress, there are also delegates in an advisory capacity only. These delegates are entitled to participate in debates but have no voting rights.
These delegates are divided into two groups:

1.    Certain office holders, for instance members of the Executive, members of the Zionist General Council who were not elected as delegates to Congress, Chairmen of the Zionist Federations, legal office holders – the President of the Zionist Supreme Court, the Attorney, the Comptroller and representatives of the Aliyah Movement.

2.    The Executive of the Congress Presidium may invite "personalities and representatives of bodies whose presence at Congress in the view of the Executive or the Presidium is necessary or desirable" (Regulation 7A of the Standing Orders of the Zionist Congress). In this framework, a delegation from the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) was appointed at the Thirty-Second Zionist Congress. A World Jewish Congress delegation, a Dor Hemshech delegation and a group of academics also attended the Thirty-Second Congress.

The Course of the Congress
The Congress is conducted by the Congress Presidium. The Congress deliberations are divided into five stages:

1.    Opening of the Congress, including a speech by the Chairman of the Executive, and other speeches determined in the agenda, election of the Congress Presidium, the report of the President of the Zionist Supreme Court on the election results, reports of the members of the Executive to complete the printed report, election of the Congress committees.

2.    Election of the new Executive, according to the proposal of a Congress Permanent Committee.

3.    Meetings of the committees.

A sample of the subjects raised at the Thirty-Second Congress and discussed in the Committees is presented below:

1.    The Function of the Zionist Movement in Diaspora Jewish Communities (Goals and Structure)
2.    The Young Generation and the Zionist Movement -Development of Young Leadership
3.    Settlement
4.    The Zionist Movement and the State of Israel
5.    Aliya and Klita and Zionist Hagshama
6.    The Partnership within the framework of the Jewish Agency
7.    Antisemitism
8.    Jewish-Zionist Education
9.    Demography of the Jewish People
10.    Zionist-ideological Hasbara

1.    Reports of the committees and voting on the draft resolutions presented by them. The report of the Permanent Committee and voting on its proposals for members of the Zionist General Council, the Comptroller and the Legal Institutions.
2.    Winding-up.

 
THE ZIONIST GENERAL COUNCIL

The Zionist General Council is the supreme institution of the Zionist movement in the inter-Congress period. The Zionist General Council has all the powers of the Congress except for those expressly reserved for the Congress.

The Zionist General Council inspects and, in so far as necessary, decides upon the manner in which the Executive will implement the decisions of the Congress and of the Council. The Zionist General Council receives and considers the reports of the Executive.

The Zionist Council, upon proposal of the Executive, either itself or through the Permanent Committee for Budget and Finance, decides upon all budgetary and financial matters, provided such a decision is not inconsistent with the decisions of Congress.

Should the position of a member of the Executive, a member of the Presidium or a deputy member of the Presidium fall vacant for any reason whatsoever in the inter-Congress period, the Zionist General Council elects a new member in his stead. This election is carried out at the next Session of the Zionist General Council or in the interSession period by mail/fax. The decision on such a vote is taken by the Presidium, in consultation with the Executive. The vote is valid if at least 50% of the Zionist General Council with voting rights participate.

Composition of the Zionist General Council

In pursuance of Article 32 Section 1 of the Constitution, the Congress elects the members of the Council entitled to vote in accordance with the relative strength of the Groupings in Congress. Every Congress Grouping is represented on the Council by a number of members equal to one-fifth of the total number of delegates of the respective Grouping. A remainder of at least 3 as a result of such division entitles a Grouping to an additional member on the Council.

The composition of the Zionist General Council elected at the Thirty-Second Zionist Congress is as follows:

Representatives of the World Unions – 119 members
Labor Zionist Movement ? Mapam: 32 members
Likud ? Moledet: 28 members

Mizrachi-Hapoel Hamizrachi, Tzomet, Hatehiya: 18 members

The World Confederation of United Zionists: 16 members

Arzenu, Tnuat Hamercaz-Hanoar Hazioni, Shinuy, Ratz: 14 members

Mercaz: 6 members

WIZO*: 5 members

* In the XXXII/3 Zionist General Council Session (1993) it was resolved to increase the WIZO presentation by one, in other the number of WIZO members in the Zionist General Council is 6.

Representatives of the International Jewish
Organizations – 44 members

World Sephardi Federation: 8 members

B’nai B’rith International: 8 members

Maccabi World Union: 5 members

World Conference of Synagogues and Kehiloth (Orthodox): 5 members

World Council of Synagogues (Conservative): 5 members

World Union for Progressive Judaism (Reform): 5 members

Students Delegation: 5 members

The Zionist Council in Israel: 3 members

The delegation from the Former Soviet Union*: 8 members

* By virtue of a decision of the Zionist General Council at its XXXII/3 Session, held in June 1993.

20 Chairmen of Zionist Federations of countries which were represented at the foregoing Congress by 3 or more delegates are also members of the Zionist General Council with the same status as the international Jewish organizations.

The Zionist Congress elects deputy members of the Council equal to twice the number of members.

The total number of Zionist General Council members is 192.

Participants in the Zionist General Council in an Advisory Capacity
In pursuance of Article 32, Section 3 of the Constitution.

1.    Members of the Executive.
2.    One representative each of the Jewish Colonial Trust, the Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael and the Keren Hayesod-United Israel Appeal.
3.    The President of the Zionist Supreme Court and the Attorney of the World Zionist Organization.
4.    The Comptroller.
5.    Members of the Executive in the period preceding the Congress and members of the Executive who have resigned during the current Congress period.
6.    Zionist leaders, not to exceed 16, proposed by the Executive of the World Zionist Organization and the Presidium of the Council jointly, and approved by the Congress or the Council.
7.    Representatives of the Zionist bodies, the number of which will not exceed 4, who participated in the Congress in an advisory capacity.
8.    Honorary fellows.
9.    The former Chairmen of the Executive and the former Chairmen of the Zionist General Council.
10.    The Chairmen of Zionist Federations whose countries were represented at the foregoing Congress by one or two delegates.

Sessions of the Zionist General Council

The first Session of the Zionist General Council convenes immediately upon conclusion of the Zionist Congress which elected it. At this Session the Chairman of the Zionist General Council and the Presidium of the Zionist General Council are elected. The Chairman of the Council is also the Chairman of the Presidium.

The Sessions of the Zionist General Council are generally held once yearly in mid-June. In exceptional cases and for important reasons, the Zionist General Council decides to convene an additional Session.

Upon the written proposal of at least one-third of the members of the Council entitled to vote belonging to at least two different groupings, the Presidium of the Council may convene an extraordinary session. Before the Thirty-Second Zionist Congress two extraordinary sessions were held for purposes of amending the Constitution – one for an increase in the number of mandates for the delegation to the Congress from the countries of the Diaspora (excluding the USA) in such a way that it would not exceed 211 mandates, and the second to increase the number of mandates of the USA to the Thirty-Second Congress by ten. Accordingly, the number of members of the US delegation to Congress was 162.

Agenda of the Zionist General Council Session

No later than seventy days prior to opening of the Session, the Presidium together with the Executive determines the agenda of the Session. For this purpose a joint committee is formed, made up of representatives of the Executive and the Presidium. The final proposal of this committee is approved by the Presidium and the Executive. The Executive may introduce modifications in the agenda. The Presidium is charged with distribution of the Agenda to all the Session participants. The number of topics discussed by the Session will not exceed 2. According to Regulation 22A, Par. 1 of the Standing Orders of the Zionist General Council, 20 members of the Council are entitled to propose inclusion of topics in the agenda.

Draft resolutions are submitted only on topics discussed by the Session. The draft resolutions are submitted by the members of the Zionist General Council, the Zionist Federations and the Executive and the Presidium. The draft resolutions are submitted in writing, formulated and explained, no later than 40 days prior to the opening of the Session. Draft resolutions of the Presidium and the Executive may arrive later than this date. In pursuance of Regulation 22A, Par. 3 of the Standing Orders of the Zionist General Council, a Resolutions and Drafting Committee of the Presidium examines and classifies the draft resolutions.

Course of the Zionist General Council
The deliberations of the Zionist General Council Session are divided into four stages:

Stage 1 – Opening of the Session – report of the Chairman of the Zionist Executive; speech of members of the Executive when matters relative to their Departments were included in the Session Agenda; report on the World Zionist Organization budget.

Stage 2 – Committees discuss topics that were raised and discussed in the plenary session. In the committees the draft resolutions submitted to the Session are discussed.

Stage 3 – Reports of the committees and voting on the draft resolutions submitted by them.

Stage 4 – Winding-up speeches.

Interpellations
Every member of the Zionist General Council may address a query to the Chairman of the Executive, the members and the Chairmen of the executives of the National Funds on their work, on the Zionist Movement in its entirety, or on the field of activity of those questioned.
 
THE PRESIDIUM OF THE ZIONIST GENERAL COUNCIL
The Presidium of the Zionist General Council is elected at the first Session of the Council after the Zionist Congress. The Chairman of the Zionist General Council who was elected at this Session is also the Chairman of the Presidium.

Composition of the Presidium
The number of the members of the Presidium apart from the Chairman is 30. This number includes the representatives of the international Jewish organizations.

In pursuance of Section 4 Par. 4 of the Standing Orders of the Zionist General Council, "In periods between the sessions the functions of the Presidium shall be discharged by its members domiciled in Israel. The places of members of the Presidium domiciled abroad shall be filled, in periods between the sessions, by deputies domiciled in the State of Israel who shall be elected by the General Council together with members of the Presidium."

Should the position of a member of the Presidium or a deputy-member of the Presidium fall vacant in the inter-Congress period for any reason whatsoever, the Zionist General Council selects a member or a deputy member in his stead.

All the Presidium members have voting rights. However, the voting rights of the representatives of the international organizations are restricted in accordance with Section 5 Par. 4(4) of the World Zionist Organization Constitution. They do not vote on matters of candidature and will not participate in elections to the governing bodies.

Powers of the Presidium

1.    To determine, in consultation with the Executive, the dates of the Sessions of the Zionist General Council, where they will be held, their duration and, in conjunction with the Executive, the Agenda.
2.    To conduct the Session of the Zionist General Council.
3.    To represent the Zionist General Council before internal and external bodies.
4.    To execute the activities with which it is charged in pursuance of the Regulations of the World Zionist Organization.
5.    To consider and decide on matters transmitted to it by the Zionist Congress or the Zionist General Council.
6.    To shorten dates in elections to Congress.
7.    To decide on postponement of a Session of the Zionist General Council and to participate in discussion on postponement of the Congress.
8.    To approve changes of members and deputy members of the Zionist General Council.
9.    To decide in a state of emergency on deviation from the provisions of the Constitution or another of the World Zionist Organization.
10.    To complete the representation of the World Zionist Organization to the Jewish Agency Assembly, i.e. if the number of members of the World Zionist Organization is greater than the number of members of the Zionist General Council with voting rights.
11.    To determine the way in which the report of the Comptroller will be presented to the Zionist General Council.
12.    It may, in urgent cases, appoint the Deputy Comptroller.
13.    In accordance with the Rules of the Permanent Committee for Budget and Finance, it may convene this committee to its first meeting. The Presidium is empowered by a resolution of the Zionist General Council to elect the members of the Permanent Committee for Budget and Finance and the members of the Board of Directors of the Keren kayemeth Le’lsrael.
14.    To form the preparatory committee that is charged with preparing the activity of the Permanent Committee of the Congress. The Presidium will convene the Preparatory Committee to its first meeting and will inform it of the anticipated results of the elections to Congress.
15.    It may determine, in accordance with a proposal of the Executive and in consultation with the President of the Zionist Supreme Court and the World Zionist Organization Attorney, that in a given electoral area a vote cannot be held for reasons independent of the Zionist Movement and of the will of the local Zionists.
16.    The Resolutions and Drafting Committee of the Presidium is constituted on a party basis, and is charged with classifying and examining the draft resolutions submitted in order to avoid duplication and to cancel or reduce draft resolutions of a purely declarative nature.

In order to execute its functions, the Presidium is in constant contact with the Executive from which it receives all the information required for this purpose. The Chairman of the Zionist General Council is invited to the meetings of the Executive at which the date of the Zionist General Council Session, the locality and the agenda are discussed, and to the debates on basic problems of the Zionist Movement. Should the Presidium see fit to consult with the Executive on a given subject, it may address a proposal to it to hold a joint meeting. The date of the meeting will be determined as soon as possible with the agreement of both institutions.

The Executive assists the Presidium in execution of its activities and for these ends places at its disposal the administration of the Department of Organization and Community Relations and the means required.
 
THE EXECUTIVE OF THE WORLD ZIONIST ORGANIZATION

The Zionist Congress elects the Chairman of the Executive (Appendix 5) and the Executive, which is charged with conducting the affairs of the World Zionist Organization in Israel and the Diaspora. The Executive is the executive institution of the World Zionist Organization. It handles daily work of the Zionist Movement in the Diaspora, in the Zionist Federations, regarding Hasbara and formal and informal education. 1990 saw the founding of the Joint Authority for Jewish-Zionist Education, which groups within it the Departments that handle education. The Executive is charged with executing the decisions of the Congress and of the Zionist General Council and is responsible to these bodies. The Zionist Executive works through the following departments:

1.    Organization and Community Relations
2.    Information
3.    Students and Academics
4.    Sephardi Communities
5.    Leadership Development and Dor Hemshech
6.    Finance
7.    The Rural Settlement Division
8.    The Immigration and Absorption Division
9.    The Division for Manpower Resources.

In addition, there is an Authority for Emissaries which trains the emissaries of the World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency.

The Nature and Composition of the Executive Elected at the Thirty-Second Zionist Congress

The Constitution does not establish the number of members of the Executive, but leaves it to each Congress to elect the number of members of the Executive that it sees fit. The number of representatives of the international Jewish Organizations in the Executive is determined by agreements between them and the Executive, approved by the Congress or by the Zionist General Council.

In accordance with Resolution 113 of the Thirty-Second Zionist Congress, the Inner Executive is made up of 25 members in addition to the Chairman of the Executive. The list includes 5 members from the Diaspora, 13 holders of portfolios and 8 members without portfolio. The Thirty-Second Zionist Congress elected another 29 members to the Extended Executive. The total number of members of the Extended Executive is 55.

While a "wall-to-wall coalition" has been in practice for many years, the Constitution does not obligate this arrangement. The Executive in fact accepted the principle of collective responsibility, even though this is not anchored in the Constitution.

The relations between the Zionist Executive in Jerusalem and the Executive in the USA have seen established by custom. The Constitution says that the seat of the Executive and its Head Office will be in Jerusalem. However, the Congress or the Zionist General Council may set up one or several offices of the Executive overseas. In 1996, rules were approved for conducting meetings of the Executive.

Should the place of one of the members of the Executive fall vacant in the inter-Congress period for any reason whatsoever, the Zionist General Council elects a new member in his stead.

Report of the Activities of the Executive

The Executive submits to the Zionist General Council a report of its Department’s activities between one Session of the Zionist General Council and the next.

The Executive also decides on the manner of signing contracts in writing and other documents of a nature to bind the World Zionist Organization.
 
THE ZIONIST FEDERATIONS

The territorial Zionist Federation is generally a roof organization that organizes all the Jewish organizations defining themselves as Zionists and individual Zionists who have signed the "Jerusalem Program" and who accept the Constitution of the Federation.

In pursuance of Article 5 Section 1 of the WZO Constitution, every Federation which accepts the Zionist Program and the WZO Constitution may be a member of the World Zionist Organization. The admission of a Zionist Federation as a Member is decided, upon the proposal of the Executive, by the Zionist General Council. The decision of the Zionist General Council is valid if it is approved in the presence of a majority of its members with voting rights and by a majority of two-thirds of the voters. Only one Zionist Federation from each country is accepted as a member. Every Zionist Organization must be a member of the Zionist Federation of its country, and every Federation must accept every Territorial Zionist Organization, which is in a sense a national branch of a Zionist World Union.

In pursuance of Article 7 of the Constitution, in order to be a Member of the World Zionist Organization, a Zionist Federation shall comply with the following requirements:

1.    Admit as a member every Zionist body and individual who accepts the Constitution of the Federation and the program of the World Zionist Organization unless in the opinion of the Federation there exists a weighty reason against such admission. A Federation is not entitled to refuse the admission of a body affiliated with one of the Congress groupings.
2.    According to principles of justice, equality and democracy, it will prevent the membership of bodies or individuals who adhere to or advocate discrimination based on origin, nationality or race and will Conduct its affairs having regard to the protection of the requirements of all members of the Federation.
3.    Hold at least once very three years a national convention and determine in its Constitution a method of electing its governing bodies and a method of electing delegates to the convention consistent with accepted democratic principles and which will, inter alia, ensure adequate representation of the Keren Hayesod-United Israel Appeal, the UJA and the Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael;
4.    Set up a framework encompassing all Zionist youth movements operating in the coconcerned, as well as a framework for graduates of youth movements and members of organizations of young people.
5.    Establish local branches of the Federation wherever practicable.
6.    Stipulate that all bodies affiliated with the Federation commit their members to fulfilling their obligations towards the Keren HayesodUnited Israel Appeal, the Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel and the UJA and that the members of the Executive of the Federation take an active part in the work of the National Funds; it will assure the fulfillment of the above obligations by means of regulations.
7.    Ensure the right of any Zionist body which has been refused admission as a member, or has been suspended from the membership, to appeal the decision before a Zionist Territorial Tribunal. It will also ensure the right of any person whose membership in any of the governing bodies of the Federation has been suspended, to submit an appeal to the Territorial Judicial Body and from the decision of that body to the Zionist Supreme Court.

Status and Rights of the Zionist Federation

A Zionist Federation which was accepted as a member of the World Zionist Organization will be the body together with which the Executive will carry out its functions and obligations. The Executive, the Heads of the Departments and their representatives will consult with the executive body of the Federation or with its authorized representatives as regards their Zionist activities in the area in question.

Every Zionist Federation will determine the manner and the methods of admission of individual Zionists who are not members of any Zionist body as members of the Federation. The Chairmen of Zionist Federations which are represented at the Congress by 8 delegates or more, who were not elected themselves as delegates, participate in the Congress and in its committees in an advisory capacity. The Executive may invite a further number of Chairmen of Zionist Federations, but no more than 5, to participate in the Congress and its committees in an advisory capacity.
Chairmen of the Federations of countries which were represented in the foregoing Zionist Congress by at least 3 delegates, participate in the meetings of the Zionist General Council with voting rights on all matters except matters of candidature and elections to the governing bodies of the World Zionist Organization.

Chairmen of the Federations who participate in the Sessions of the Zionist General Council as representatives of Federations will not join any of the Zionist General Council Groupings.

There are 20 Zionist Federations whose Chairmen have voting rights: the Federations of Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, England, the Federation of Mizrachi-Hapoel Hamizrachi in England, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Mexico, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Venezuela, Uruguay, USA.

There are also 8 Zionist Federations whose Chairmen can participate in the Sessions of the Zionist General Council in an advisory capacity since they had one or two delegates to the Zionist Congress. These Federations are: Colombia, Denmark, Greece, Hungary (which was recognized again as a Zionist Federation at the Thirty-Second Zionist Congress), India, New Zealand, Peru, Spain.

The Federations differ from each other as to the numbers and importance of direct members and members through organizations. There are countries in which parties do not exist or are not important organizationally, and most of the Federation members are direct members. On the other hand, in certain countries the number of direct members who do not belong to any organizations but directly to the Federation is negligible.

The Judicial Bodies
 THE ZIONIST SUPREME COURT

In pursuance of Article 47 of the WZO Constitution, the Zionist Supreme Court consists of 30 judges at most, in addition to the President of the Court.

Each member of the Court swears to fulfill his duty impartially and to the best of his knowledge and conscience. The oath of the President of the Court is received by the Chairman of the Zionist General Council.
The members of the Zionist General Council entitled to vote, the members of the Executive, the Comptroller and the Deputy Comptroller, the Attorney of the World Zionist Organization and his Deputies, and officials of the World Zionist Organization and the Central Zionist bodies may not be members of the Court.

The President of the Zionist Supreme Court is elected by the Zionist Congress.

The five Deputy-Presidents of the Zionist Supreme Court and the judges of the Court are appointed by a Committee for Appointment of Judges of the Court, which is elected by the Permanent Committee of the Congress.
Unless the Congress decides otherwise, the seat of the Court is in Jerusalem. The hearings of the Court are held with a composition of three or five judges. The President of the Court, and in his absence his deputy, decides on the composition in each case.

The Court operates according to rules enacted by the Zionist General Council and any change in these rules requires the approval of the Council.
In any country in which a territorial Zionist Organization exists, a judicial body is set up that is empowered to discuss and decide in the area, subject to the authority of this body. This body is empowered to interpret the Constitution of the National Zionist Organization, to judge disputes between territorial Zionist bodies or between individual Zionists, matters related to Zionist activity or deriving from membership in a Zionist territorial body.

Powers of the Zionist Supreme Court (in pursuance of Article 49 of the WZO Constitution)

1.    As a Court Tribunal of First Instance, the Court determines:

1.    the legality of decisions of the Central Zionist Bodies, whether in connection with a dispute or upon the proposal of the Executive or the Attorney of the World Zionist Organization;
2.    Disputes between Zionist Bodies, where at least one party is the’ World Zionist Organization or a Central Zionist Body or where the parties to the disputes have their head offices in different countries;
3.    Disputes, except monetary disputes, between the World Zionist Organization or a Central Zionist Body and individual Zionists in matters connected with Zionist work or arising out of membership in a Zionist Body;
4.    Objections to decisions to postpone the Congress or to postpone a session of the Council;
5.    Matters relating to elections to the Zionist Congress, and appeals against the determination of the number of delegates;
6.    Matters relative to acts allegedly infringing the Constitution or damaging the interests or prestige of the World Zionist Organization.

In all the aforesaid matters, the Court may make such order or impose such sanction as it deems fit, provided that it takes due care that such order or such sanction does not damage the interests of innocent bodies or individuals.

1.    As a Court of Appeal on judgments of a Territorial Zionist Tribunal.

ATTORNEY OF THE WORLD ZIONIST ORGANIZATION

The Attorney of the World Zionist Organization and his Deputies are elected by the Congress.

The Attorney represents the interests of the World Zionist Organization, including matters related to infringements of the Constitution or the interests and prestige of the World Zionist Organization, brought before the Court. The Attorney advises the Central Zionist Bodies in legal matters connected with the World Zionist Organization Constitution, the decisions of the Congress, the Council and the Executive, and with the relations between the Central Zionist Bodies and between them and other Zionist bodies or individual Zionists.

The Comptroller of The World Zionist Organization
 Status and Functions of the Comptroller

In pursuance of Article 60 Section 1 of the WZO Constitution, the Comptroller shall inspect the financial, economic, administrative and organizational activities of the World Zionist Organization and of its officers, companies and institutions of every kind, including those in which the World Zionist Organization holds at least 50% of the voting power or the capital.

The term of office of the Comptroller is from the Congress which elected him to the termination of thefollowing Ordinary Congress.
The Comptroller presents a report on the results of his inspection to the Congress and to the Council and, if necessary, to the Permanent Committee for Budget and Finance.

The Congress or the Zionist General Council may elect a Deputy-Comptroller.

The Executive makes available all the documents required by the Comptroller for his examination. The methods of activity of the Comptroller and the obligations of the bodies being inspected by the comptroller are determined by special rules. The Comptroller participates in an advisory capacity in the Congress, in the Zionist General Council and in their committees.

The Zionist Archives

 The Central Zionist Archives which constitutes a body of the World Zionist Organization, is the historic archive of the World Zionist Organization, the Jewish Agency, Keren Hayesod and the World Jewish Congress. It’s status was determined by decisions of the Twenty-Fourth and the Twenty-Sixth Zionist Congresses (1956, 1965).

The function of the Archives is to centralize historically valuable documentation of Zionism in all the periods and all the countries, and of the history of the Hebrew yishuv in Eretz-Israel; to prepare this documentation and to make it available to the general public for purposes of study and research

The Archives delivers a report on its activities to the Zionist General Council (generally once yearly) and to the Zionist Congress. The annual reports which are submitted to the State Archives are brought to the knowledge of the members of the Executive of the World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency. The Executive of the Zionist Archives, which is made up of representatives of the World Zionist Organization, the Jewish Agency for Israel, Keren Kayemeth Le”Israel and Keren Hayesod, supervises the Archives? activities.

Zionist Bodies Set Up Following Decisions of the Zionist Congresses
 
THE WORLD ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
The First Zionist Congress, which convened in 1897 in Basel, decided on the founding of the World Zionist Organization.
 
THE JEWISH COLONIAL TRUST
The Second Zionist Congress, which convened in 1898 in Base, decided on the founding of the Jewish Colonial Trust. The Jewish Colonial Trust was the parent company of the Anglo-Palestine Bank, which became the Bank Leumi Le-Israel following the establishment of the State.

Herzl saw the establishment of the Jewish Colonial Trust as a financial tool for realization of the idea of the Jewish State, and which would serve the political and economic activity of the World Zionist Organization, through which a concession was received from the Turks for settlement of Jews in Palestine.

In 1992, the Jewish Colonial Trust ceased to be the parent company of Bank Leumi, at the request of the Israeli government.

Currently, the Jewish Colonial Trust holds four and a half percent of the Bank Leumi shares. The National Institutions hold twenty-two percent of Bank Leumi shares.

KEREN KAYEMETH LE’ISRAEL (Jewish National Fund) (Appendix 18)
The Fifth Zionist Congress, held in Basel in December 1901, decided on the formation of the Keren Kayemet Le’Israel.

This is a fund of the Zionist Movement for redemption of the lands of Eretz-lsrael by the Jewish people around the world, preparation of the lands and making them available to the Jewish settlers in Eretz Israel.

Since its establishment and until this day, Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael has engaged in development of the land in Israel. This activity includes: an extensive afforestation project, preparation of land for agriculture, settlement, tourist enterprises and for housing for immigrants and the needy, roadbuilding in border outlying areas, construction of water reservoirs and dams to expand available water resources, environmental conservation and scenic enhancement, rolling back the desert, river rehabilitation and the fostering of Zionist education aimed at strengthening the ties of Jewish youth in Israel and the Diaspora to the land.
This body is headed by a Board of Directors elected by the members of the Zionist General Council.

KEREN HAYESOD – UNITED ISRAEL APPEAL
Keren Hayesod was established in London in 1920 and was confirmed by the Twelfth Zionist Congress in 1921, after World War I, in Carlsbad.
Keren Hayesod was registered as "a Company Limited by Guarantee, not having a share capital". Its members are elected subject to the approval of the Zionist Executive which also appoints from among its members the Chairman (appendix 8) and members of the Board of Directors. Until the end of 1926 the head office of Keren Hayesod, with its various departments, was located in London. Since then Keren Hayesod has had its headquarters in Jerusalem.

Keren Hayesod still operates in the spirit of its Foundation Declaration, issued in 1920 by Chaim Weizmann, Nahum Sokolow, Zeev Jabotinsky and other Zionist leaders. "The key is in the hands of the Jewish people" it declared. "No casual charity will suffice". The declaration called for "self-taxation – steady, persistent, systematic, inspired by the noble Jewish tradition of the tithe".

Unitil the establishment of the State of Israel Keren Hayesod was the financial arm of the "state in the making". It funded immigration and absorption, rural settlement and security, vocational training, development of water sources, etc.

In 1956, the Knesset passed the Keren Hayesod Law defining Keren Hayesod’s role in the age of Jewish independence and authorizing it to act "in strengthening the State of Israel, the ingathering of the exiles and the unification of the Jewish people".

Affiliated with 90 campaigns in 50 countries over five continents, excluding the USA where the United Jewish Appeal (UJA) operates, Keren Hayesod reaches out to Jewish communities around the world. Together with the UJA it funds the activities of the Jewish Agency.
The main goal of Keren Hayesod today is saving Jewish lives and Jewish life through:

1.    Aliyah, rescue and initial absorption of immigrants in Israel.
2.    Developing Israel’s peripheral regions through links with Diaspora communities.
3.    Returning young Jews to their heritage through education.

THE JEWISH AGENCY FOR ISRAEL
The Sixteenth Zionist Congress which convened in Zurich decided on the establishment of the Jewish Agency for Israel which would be a joint framework for the World Zionist Organization and for non-Zionists wishing to participate in the building of the National Home (page 47).

The Jewish Agency for Israel (Appendix 1)
 In the wake of the Balfour Declaration, the leaders of the World Zionist Organization realized it was necessary to quicken the pace of building Eretz Israel but that they could not themselves raise among their members the financial means for this objective. Accordingly, they came to the conclusion that they required assistance through funds of Jews who were not members of the World Zionist Organization and who did not accept the nationalist outlook. The WZO leaders also perceived that they required maximum political backing, by as many circles as possible in World Jewry. Over the years the idea crystallized of creating a joint organization, where 50% of the members would be representatives of the World Zionist Organization and 50% representatives of organizations and personalities who would be able to furnish financial aid and political influence and status in their countries. It should be noted that the Jewish Agency is the only organization of its kind in the world. It exists by virtue of an international Charter that was determined in 1922 by the League of Nations, as part of the mandate that it gave to the British to take control of the areas that they had conquered in World War 1 and, in the wording of the Charter, to work “for the furthering of the Jewish homeland in Palestine”. Later, the Charter was readopted by the UN.

The Sixteenth Zionist Congress (1929) decided on the establishment of the Jewish Agency for Israel, which would be a joint body of the World Zionist Organization and those known as "non-Zionists" in the belief that all Jews wished to participate in building the National Home. Upon conclusion of the Congress, Board of the Jewish Agency convened. Of its 224 members, 112 were Zionists (members of the World Zionist Organization) including Prof. Chaim Weizmann who was elected as President of the Jewish Agency, Nahum Sokolow, Menahem Ussishkin, Shemaryahu Levin, David Ben-Gurion, Rabbi Uziel; the 112 "non-Zionist" members included Louis Marshall, Shalom Asch, Albert Einstein, Leon Blum, and members of the Rothschild family. The Keren Hayesod was declared the main financial tool of the New Jewish Agency. It was decided not to change the status of the Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael or to modify its relations with the Worjd Zionist Organization; although it remained under the control of the World Zionist Organization it would serve as a tool for acquiring lands for the objectives of the Jewish Agency.

Immediately after the constitution of the expanded Jewish Agency in 1929, the riots of 1929 broke out. In this period difficulties which emerged showed that the partnership was not successful. In the course of time several personalities representing the "non-Zionists" joined the Zionist Executive; however, they asserted that they were not consulted, that only their money was of interest, and that the policy was determined even after the creation of the Jewish Agency by the members of the Zionist Movement. For their part, the Zionists were disappointed by the financial revenues of the Funds.

Following the onset of the crisis of Central European Jewry in 1933, the relations between the Zionists and the "non-Zionists" deteriorated, and in fact, after the death of Otto Warburg, the representative of the "non-Zionists" on the Executive, the non-Zionist part of the Jewish Agency came to an end in the USA.

In 1946, at the Twenty-Second Zionist Congress, immediately after World War II, it was decided to attempt to renew the cooperation with the "non-Zionists" in the framework of the Jewish Agency. This decision did not obligate immediate action, but constituted a beginning for healing the breach.

In 1952, the official functions of the Jewish Agency and of the World Zionist Organization were defined in the Status Law (Appendix 13) which determines that these bodies are charged with the ingathering of the exiles and with absorption of immigrants in Israel. Details of the cooperation between the Israeli Government and the Executive of the World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency were laid down in a Covenant signed in July 1954 (Appendix 15).

In 1969, as a result of the response of world Jewry to the threat to Israel’s existence in the period prior to the Six-Day War, the Appeals for Israel expanded. This gave a new status to the partnership, manifested in the response to the invitation of the Israeli Prime Minister and the Chairman of the Jewish Agency Executive to a Conference for Critical Needs that convened in Jerusalem. This symbolized a new spirit of closer cooperation. The Diaspora participants expressed their wish to assume part of the responsibility for planning and execution of programs and services of the Jewish Agency.

In 1971, the representatives of the World Zionist Organization invited the United Israel Appeal and Keren Hayesod to negotiate and sign an "Agreement for the Reconstitution of the Jewish Agency" (Appendix 16). In accordance with this agreement, the Jewish Agency was charged with responsibility for working principally in the State of Israel, as a partner in the building of the State and the advancement of society. This was manifested in creation of the Youth Aliyah Department and the Department for Immigration and Absorption for immigrants from countries of distress, and in support for educational activities, youth care, rural settlement and housing of immigrants. In 1979, the Jewish Agency Assembly approved the creation of the Department for Renewal and Development, for rehabilitation of neighborhoods and development towns throughout Israel. In October 1992, the Rural Settlement Department and the Renewal Department were merged to form the Department for Urban and Rural Development.

The Jewish Agency Assembly
The Assembly is the supreme institution of the Jewish Agency. Since the Thirty-Second Zionist Congress it has been made up of 518 members. 50% of its members are representatives of the World Zionist Organization, 30% are representatives of the United Israel Appeal in the USA and 20% are representatives of Keren Hayesod in the other Countries.
The Assembly convenes once yearly, generally in the last week of June.

Functions of the Assembly

1.    To receive and examine reports of the Board of Governors.
2.    To make recommendations on fundamental issues.
3.    To determine matters of policy and basic objectives of the Jewish Agency.
4.    To express an opinion as regards principal trends in the budget, including long-term forecasts.
5.    To discuss and decide on the budgets submitted by the Board of Governors.
6.    To make decisions on the matters cited above.
7.    To elect the Board of Governors and its Chairman.

The Board of Governors of the Jewish Agency
The Board of Governors determines the policy of the Jewish Agency. It directs, inspects, controls and guides its activities (Appendix No.6).
All the bodies, officials and office-holders in the Jewish Agency work in the framework of the policy determined by the Board of Governors and are responsible to the Board.

In the inter-Assembly period, the Board of Governors is fully empowered to act on behalf of the Jewish Agency. The Board of Governors may determine policy, provided that its decisions do not contradict previous decisions of the Assembly.

The Board of Governors approves and decides on the annual budget of the Jewish Agency.

The Board of Governors has 120 members, in the same ratio as the Assembly: 50% are representatives of the World Zionist Organization, 30% are representatives of the United Israel Appeal in the USA and 20% are representatives of the bodies affiliated to Keren Hayesod. TheBoard of Governors has 46 members who are public figures and mayors and heads of Councils (23 were elected by the World Zionist Organization and 23 by the UIA and Keren Hayesod).

The Board of Governors meets three times yearly. It has committees for departmental and budgetary matters, and for matters of organization, relations between the Jewish Agency and the World Zionist Organization, the relations between the Jewish Agency and the Government, etc.

The Executive of the Jewish Agency
The Executive directs the Jewish Agency activities, subject to the supervision of the Board of Governors. Matters of policy laid down by the Assembly and the Board of Governors are implemented by the Executive through the following departments:

1.    Immigration and Absorption
2.    Development and Urban and Rural Settlement
3.    Youth Aliyah (until September 1996, except several institutions) Human Resources
4.    Finance
5.    The Unit for the CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States) and Eastern Europe
6.    The Pincus Fund

The Chairman of the World Zionist Organization Executive is also the Chairman of the Jewish Agency Executive. He serves as Chairman of the Jewish Agency Assembly when it convenes.

The Executive is made up of members serving by virtue of their function (ex officio) and members elected by the Board of Governors.

The Joint Authority for Jewish Zionist Education (Appendix 17)
 The Joint Authority for Jewish Zionist Education was created in 1990, and its activity is based on the following fundamental values: the centrality of Israel, Zionist fulfillment and Aliyah.
The Authority is made up of two bodies: the Commission and the Executive.

The Commission (36 members) is the supreme authority and responsible for planning policy, determining priorities and approving the budget.
The Executive (12 members) is responsible for implementing the programs, the budget and various other matters.

In pursuance of the Authority’s covenant, there are also advisory committees in various countries in the world. Currently advisory committees exist in Australia, USA, Canada, South Africa, England, France, Brazil, Venezuela, Uruguay, Argentina and Mexico.

The Authority is made up of three professional departments and a unit for central services whiincludes: a Pedagogic Center, a Unit for Development of Curricula, a "Mifgashim" Center, CIS Unit and Division for High School Programs from Abroad.
 
The three professional departments:
The Department of Torah Education and Culture in the Diaspora
This Department is charged principally with the comprehensive development and furthering of Jewish education in the spirit of Torah and Zion, and with the special school network in the Diaspora and teacher training.

The Department of Jewish Education and Culture in the Diaspora
This Department is charged principally with the comprehensive development and advancement of Jewish Zionist education in the Diaspora, the Hebrew Language, teaching of Israel and Israeli culture, the Jewish school system in the Diaspora and teacher training.

The Department of Youth and Hechalutz and Informal Education
This Department is charged principally with informal Jewish-Zionist education among the Zionist youth movements, community youth organizations and the youth organizations of the religious streams in the Israel Experience programs, and with training professional manpower for these fields.

The Education Authority has placed the following goals at the top of its scale of priorities:

1.    The Israel Experience

Israel Experience for youth from the Diaspora, as an important element in shaping the Jewish Zionist identity of the individual.

2.    Training and Development of Manpower in Education

The Authority trains the educators, before they begin to teach, in teacher training institutions in several countries and in Israel.

3.    Curricula and Study Materials

Development of curricula and study materials at all levels and of all kinds of Jewish education; the Pedagogic Center provides library services and educational resources, counseling, training for Jewish educators, and brings the best from broad and varied fields of technology in Jewish education for professionals, non-professionals, and the finest leadership. The Pedagogic Center is at the cutting edge for supply of quality educational material for learning from a distance through the Internet and provision of an answer to the needs of small or large communities.
Kiriat Hahinukh offers today accommodation for 650 students, classrooms and essential services.

Appendixes

Appendix No. 2
 
LIST OF THE ZIONIST CONGRESSES
Congress
First
1897 Basel
204 delegates
Founding of the World Zionist Organization
Adoption of Basel Program.

Second
1898 Basel
349 delegates
Establishment of "Jewish Colonial Trust"

Third
1899 Basel
153 delegates
Discussion of interpretation of Base Program.

Fourth
1900 London
498 delegates
Discussion of expulsion of Romanian Jews and distress of workers in Eretz-lsrael

Fifth
1901 Basel
358 delegates
Formation of the Jewish National Fund – Keren Kayemet Le’Israel.

Sixth
1903 Basel
592 delegates
The debate on the "Uganda Plan"

Seventh
1905 Basel
497 delegates
First Congress after Herzl. David Wolfsohn elected as President of the World Zionist Organization.
Reapproval of Basel Program. Secession of Territorialists from the WZO.

Eighth
1907 The Hague
324 delegates
It was decided to establish the Palestine Office in Jaffa, chaired by Arthur Ruppin.

Ninth
1909 Hamburg
364 delegates
For the first time the representatives of the workers’ parties in Palestine participated in the Congress.

Tenth
1911 Base
338 delegates
Discussion of practical work in Eretz Israel.

Eleventh
1913 Vienna
539 delegates
Discussion of the problems of the collective agricultural labor settlements in Eretz Israel.

Twelfth
1921 Carlsbad
512 delegates
First Congress after World War I and after the Balfour Declaration.
Approval of decision of London Conference of 1920 to found Keren Hayesod, and approval of purchase of lands in Jezreel Valley.

Thirteenth
1923 Carlsbad
331 delegates
It was decided to open the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

Fourteenth
1925 Vienna
311 delegates
Held during the Fourth Aliyah. A discussion was held on the subject of private enterprise and national settlement. It was decided to abolish the party "shekels" and to introduce "one shekel".

Fifteenth
1927 Basel
281 delegates
Crisis of the Fourth Aliyah and severe unemployment in Eretz Israel.

Sixteenth
1929 Zurich
310 delegates
Founding of the Jewish Agency. The Fifth Aliyah and improvement in the economic situation in Eretz Israel.

Seventeenth
1931 BaseI
254 delegates
Convened after the riots of 1929 and Lord Passfield’s White Paper. Opposition was expressed to the wording of the "final aim" of Zionism, as submitted by Revisionist Zionism, and the Revisionists staged a walkout from the Congress.

Eighteenth
1933 Prague
318 delegates
The Congress was held in the shadow of Hitler’s rise to power.

Nineteenth
1935 Lucerne
463 delegates
Persecutions of German Jewry.

Twentieth
1937 Zurich
484 delegates
Consideration of British Peel Commission report which proposed partition of Palestine.

Twenty-
First
1939 Geneva
527 delegates
Discussion of struggle against the "White Paper".

Twenty-
Second
1946 Basel
385 delegates
First Congress after Holocaust. Discussion of "illegal" immigration and political and military fight against British rule. Decision to establish the Jewish State immediately.

Twenty-
Third
1951 Jerusalem
446 delegates
First Congress in sovereign Israel. Adoption of "Jerusalem Program".

Twenty-
Fourth
1956 Jerusalem
496 delegates
Discussion of Israel’s security situation.

Twenty-
Fifth
    Dec. ’60-Jan. ’61
Jerusalem
521 delegates
    Deliberations on Jewish education in the Diaspora, and relations between the Israeli Government and the WZO.

Twenty-
Sixth
    Dec.’64 – Jan.’65
Jerusalem
529 delegates
    Debate on dangers of assimilation in the Diaspora, and the need to heighten Jewish awareness. The first Congress elected in pursuance of the present Constitution, instead of the Shekel System which was abolished.

Twenty-
Seventh
    1968 Jerusalem
644 delegates
    The new "Jerusalem Program" was approved.

Twenty-
Eighth
    1972 Jerusalem
559 delegates
    "The Duties of the Individual Zionist" were laid down.

Twenty-
Ninth
    1978 Jerusalem
636 delegates
    Resolution passed on amendment of the "Jerusalem Program" and on "Duties of the Individual Zionist". A resolution was passed on the centrality of Israel and another resolution defining Zionism as a national liberation movement.

Thirtieth
    1982 Jerusalem
656 delegates
    The Congress repeated its support of the State of Israel in its quest for peace and security, and confirmed the incontestable right of the Jewish people to the Land of Israel.

Thirty-
First
    1987 Jerusalem
659 delegates
    It was decided to change the priorities of the Zionist movement and concentrate on the creation of a world movement for Zionist "Hagshama". All the necessary resources and tools will be made available to the "Magshimim" movement for the realization of its aims.

Thirty-
Second
    1992 Jerusalem
721 delegates
    The Congreconcentrated on the subject of the aliyah and absorption of Jews from the former Soviet Union and Ethiopia, an area which constituted the culminating point of the World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency between the Thirty-First and the Thirty-Second Congress. At this Congress a decision was approved for forming a committee to examine the structure of the World Zionist Organization, and a committee to examine the system of elections to Congress. It was also decided to strengthen the involvement of the Zionist movement in the life of the Jewish communities around the world, inter alia in the CIS and Eastern Europe. The Congress recognized anew the Zionist Federation of Hungary, which renewed its activity this having been interrupted during the years of the Communist rule over Hungary.
Appendix No. 3
 
PRESIDENTS OF THE WORLD ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
1897 – 1904
    Theodor Herzl

1905 – 1911
    David Wolfsohn

1911 – 1920
    Otto Warburg

1931 – 1935
    Nahum Sokolow

1935 – 1946
    Prof. Chaim Weizmann

1956 – 1968
    Dr. Nahum Goldmann
Since the Twenty-Seventh Zionist Congress, no President has been elected.
Appendix No. 4
CHAIRMEN OF THE ZIONIST GENERAL COUNCIL
 
1897 – 1904
    Theodor Herzl

1911 – 1920
    Otto Warburg
His deputy during the years 1913-1918 was Dr. Yehiel Chelnov.

1921 – 1925
    Rabbi Dr. Tzvi Peretz Hayot

1925 – 1933
    Arye Leon Motzkin

1935 – 1941
    Menachem Ussishkin

1946 – 1949
    Dr. Stephan Weiss

1951 – 1959
    Joseph Shprintzak

1959 – 1961
    BerI Locker

1961 – 1968
    Yaakov Tzur

1968 – 1971
    Ehud Avriel

1972 – 1978
    Yitzchak Navon

1978 – 1982
    Yitzchak Peretz

July – Dec. 1982
    Mordechai Dayan (Acting Chairman)

1982 – 1987
    Ephraim Even

1987 – 1992
    Rabbi Asher Hirsch

1992 –
    Yitzhak Peretz
Appendix No. 5
CHAIRMEN OF THE ZIONIST EXECUTIVE
1920 – 1931
    Nahum Sokolow (called President of the Executive)

1921 – 1923
    Menachem Ussishkifl, Chairman of the Eretz-lsrael Executive.

1931 – 1932
    In this period F.H. Kisch chaired the meetings of the Executive in Jerusalem, but did not generally use the title of Chairman.

1933 – 1935
    Arthur Ruppin

1935 – 1948
    David Ben-Gurion

1948 – 1956
    BerI Locker and Dr. Nahum Goldmann

1956 – 1961
    Zalman Shazar

1961 – 1965
    Moshe Sharett

1965 – 1973
    Louis Pincus

1973 – 1974
    Arye Leon Dulzin

1974 – 1975
    Pinhas Sapir

1975 – 1976
    Arye Leon Dulzin (Acting Chairman)

1976 – 1977
    Josef Almogi

1978 – 1987
    Arye Leon Dulzin

1987 – 1994
    Simcha Dinitz

1994 – 1995
    Yehiel Leket (Acting Chairman)

1995 – 1999
    Avraham Burg

1999 ? 2002
    Sallai Meridor

Appendix No. 6
 CHAIRMEN OF THE JEWISH AGENCY BOARD OF GOVERNORS
1972 – 1984
    Max Fisher

1984 – 1988
    Charles Hoffberger

1988-1995
    Mendel Kaplan

1995 –
    Charles Goodman
Appendix No. 7
 KKL-JNF WORLD CHAIRMEN
1902 – 1907
    Yona (Johann) Krementzky

1907 – 1919
    Max Bodenheimer

1919 – 1922
    Nehemia de Lieme

1922 – 1942
    Menahem Ussishkin

1942 – 1944
    BerI Katznelson, Rabbi Meir Bar-lan, Avraham Granott

1944 – 1961
    Avraham Granot

1961 – 1977
    Jacob Tsur

1977 –
    Moshe Rivin

1983 – 1994
    Mordechai Dayan – Co-Chairman

1983 – 1994
    Shlomo Ariav – Vice Chairman

1994 – 1996
    Yona Peled – Co-Chairman

1996 –
    Avi Dickstein Co-Chairman

1994 –
    Haim Cohen – Vice Chairman
Appendix No. 8
 
KEREN HAYESOD – UNITED ISRAEL APPEAL
Managing Directors, Presidents, Presidium, Chairmen
MANAGING DIRECTOR (in London)
1920 ? 1926 Berthold Feiwel
JOINT MANAGING DIRECTORS (in Jerusalem)
1936 ? 1968 Arthur Menahem Hantke
1926 ? 1948 Leib Jaffe
1936 ? 1951 Kurt Yehuda Blumenfeld
PRESIDENTS
1951 ? 1956 BerI Locker
Nahum Goldmann
PRESIDIUM
1956 ? 1961 Eliahu Dobkin, Chairman
Arye Leon Dulzin
Moshe Kol
Shlomo Zalman Shragai
CHAIRMEN
1961 ? 1971 Israel Goldstein
1971 ? 1977 Ezra Shapira
1977 ? 1978 Fay Schenk
Phil Granovsky
1978 ? 1989 Avraham Avi-hai
1989 – Shlomo Hillel
Appendix No. 9
 
"The Basel Program"
Approved on August 31,1897, at the First Zionist Congress, in Basel
Zionism seeks to establish a home for the Jewish people in Palestine secured under public law. The Congress contemplates the following means to the attainment of this end:

1.    The promotion by appropriate means of the settlement in Palestine of Jewish farmers, artisans, and manufacturers.
2.    The organization and uniting of the whole of Jewry by means of appropriate institutions, both local and international, in accordance with the laws of each country.
3.    The strengthening and fostering of Jewish national sentiment and national consciousness.
4.    Preparatory steps toward obtaining the consent of governments, where necessary, in order to reach the goal of Zionism.

Appendix No. 10
 
The Jerusalem Program, 1951
Approved on August 10,1951 at the 23rd Zionist Congress, the first to be held in the State of Israel

1.    The task of Zionism is the consolidation of the State of Israel, the ingathering of exiles in Eretz Israel, and the fostering of the unity of the Jewish people.

The program of work of the Zionist Organization is:

1.    Encouragement of immigration, absorption and integration of immigrants; support of Youth Aliyah; stimulation of agricultural settlement and economic development; acquisition of land as the property of the people.
2.    Intensive work for halutziut (pioneering) and hachsharah (training for halutziut).
3.    Concerted effort to harness funds in order to carry out the tasks of Zionism.
4.    Encouragement of private capital investment.
5.    Fostering of Jewish consciousness by propagating the Zionist idea and strengthening the Zionist Movement; imparting the values of Judaism; Hebrew education and spreading the Hebrew language.
6.    Mobilization of world public opinion for Israel and Zionism.
7.    Participation in efforts to organize and intensify Jewish life on democratic foundations, maintenance and defense of Jewish rights.

Appendix No. 11
 
The Revised Jerusalem Program of 1968
Adopted at the 27th Zionist Congress, held in Jerusalem, June 19, 1968
The aims of Zionism are:

1.    The unity of the Jewish people and the centrality of Israel in Jewish life
2.    The ingathering of the Jewish people in its historic homeland, Eretz Israel, through aliyah from all countries;
3.    The strengthening of the State of Israel which is based on the prophetic vision of justice and peace;
4.    The preservation of the identity of the Jewish people through the fostering of Jewish, Hebrew and Zionist* education and of Jewish spiritual and cultural values;
5.    The protection of Jewish rights everywhere.

 
*Revised by the Zionist General council XXXI/5 (June 1991).
Appendix No. 12
 
The Duties of the Individual Zionist
The following obligations stem from the tasks and functions embraced by the Jerusalem Program, as well as from membership in the Zionist Organization:

1.    To implement aliyah to Israel.
2.    To be an active member of the Territorial Organization
3.    To endeavor to implement the program of the Zionist movement.
4.    To study Hebrew, to give one’s children a Jewish education and bring them up towards aliyah and Zionist self-fulfillment.
5.    To contribute and to be active on behalf of the Zionist Funds and to participate actively in the consolidation of Israel’s economy.
6.    To play an active role in the life of one’s community and its institutions, and to endeavor to ensure their democratic nature; to strengthen Zionist influence within the community, and to intensify Jewish education.

The Zionist Federations shall make every effort to consciousness of these duties in their members and to leaders to set a personal example in their implementation.
 
Approved at the 28th Zionist congress, which convened in 1972 in Jerusalem. Approved and adopted as an integral part of the resolutions of the 29th congress, held in February-March 1978 in Jerusalem.
Appendix No. 13
 
The World Zionist Organization and Jewish Agency for Israel (Status) Law 5713-1952
(Unofficial Translation)
The State of Israel regards itself as the creation of the entire Jewish people, and its gates are open, in accordance with its laws, to every Jew wishing to immigrate to it.
The World Zionist Organization, from its foundation five decades ago, headed the movement and efforts of the Jewish people to realize the age-old vision of the return to the homeland and with the assistance of other Jewish circles and bodies, carried the main responsfor establishing the State of Israel.
The Jewish Agency for Israel is an independent voluntary association consisting of the World Zionist Organization and other organizations and bodies. It operates in the State of Israel in fields chosen by it with the consent of their Government.
The World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency for Israel take care of immigration as before and direct absorption and settlement projects in the State.
The State of Israel recognizes the World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency for Israel as the authorized agencies which will continue to operate in the State of Israel for the development and settlement of the country, the absorption of immigrants from the Diaspora and the coordination of the activities in Israel of Jewish institutions and organizations active in those fields.
The mission of gathering in the exiles, which is the central task of the State of Israel and the Zionist Movement in our days, requires constant efforts by the Jewish people in the Diaspora; the State of Israel, therefore, expects the cooperation of all Jews, as individuals and groups, in building up the State and assisting the immigration to it of the masses of the people, and regards the unity of all sections of Jewry as necessary for this purpose.
The State of Israel expects efforts on the part of the World Zionist Organization for achieving this unity; if, to this end, the Zionist Organization, with the consent of the Government and the approval of the Knesset, should decide to broaden its basis, the enlarged body will enjoy the status conferred upon the World Zionist Organization in the State of Israel.
The provisions of Sections 5 and 6 apply mutatis mutandis to the Jewish Agency for Israel.
Details of the status of the World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency for Israel and the form of their cooperation with the Government shall be determined by Covenants to be made in Israel between the Government and each of these two bodies.
The Covenant with the World Zionist Organization shall be based on the declaration of the 23rd Zionist Congress in Jerusalem that the practical work of the World Zionist Organization and its various bodies for the fulfillment of their historic task in Eretz-lsrael requires full cooperation and coordination on its part with the State of Israel and its Government, in accordance with the laws of the State.
The Covenant with the Jewish Agency for Israel shall provide for full cooperation and coordination on its part with the State of Israel and its Government, in accordance with the laws of the State.
Two committees shall be set up for the coordination of activities between the Government and the World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency for Israel in the spheres in which each of them is to operate according to the Covenant made with it. The tasks of the committees shall be determined by the Covenants.
The Covenants and any variation or amendment thereof made with the consent of the two parties shall be published in Reshumot and shall come into force on the day of publication, unless they provide for an earlier or later day for this purpose.
The World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency for Israel are juristic persons and may enter into contracts, acquire, hold and relinquish property and be parties to any legal negotiations.
The World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency for Israel, each of them, and their respective funds and other institutions shall be exempt from taxes and other compulsory Government charges, subject to such restrictions and conditions as may be laid down by the Covenant; the exemption shall come into force on the coming into force of the Covenant.
 DAVID BEN-GURION
Prime Minister
YOSEF SPRINZAK
Chairman of the Knesset
Interim President of the State
Appendix No. 14
 Covenant between the Government of Israel and the World Zionist Organization
(Unofficial Translation)
The Covenant entered into between the Government of Israel (hereinafter – the Government) and the World Zionist Organization (hereinafter – the WZO) according to the World Zionist Organization and Jewish Agency for Israel (Status) Law, 5711-1952 is hereby published.
Whereas The Government is desirous to enhance the activities of the WZO and the WZO desires to cooperate and to act in full coordination with the State of Israel and its Government, in accordance with the laws of the State;
Now Therefore this Covenant is hereby entered into:

1.    The functions of the WZO are as follows:

1.    The organization of immigration abroad and the transfer of immigrants and their property to Israel.
2.    Participation in immigrants’ housing and in their absorption.
3.    Health services in connection with immigration and absorption.
4.    Youth Aliya and youth care and training.
5.    Maintenance and support in Israel and outside of Israel of cultural, educational, scientific, religious, sports and social service institutions
6.    Agricultural settlement and acquisition of property and its preparation by the institutions of the WZO.
7.    Participation in the establishment and enlargement of development enterprises in Israel.
8.    Encouragement of private capital investment in Israel.
9.    Maintenance and support of cultural enterprises, institutes of higher education and research institutes.
10.    The care of aged, disabled, handicapped and other persons in need of assistance and social services.

And only upon declaration by the WZO that it will implement only those activities, within the realm of functions described above, which the Jewish Agency does not actually implement, within its realm of functions.

1.    Any activity of the WZO or on its behalf for the purpose of performing all or any of the above functions shall be carried out in Israel in accordance with the laws of the State of Israel applicable from time to time, including administrative directions in force from time to time with regard to the governmental authorities whose jurisdiction includes or is relevant to the activity in question.
2.    In all fields covered by this Covenant the WZO shall act on the basis of plans agreed upon in advance with the Government or recommended by the Coordinating Committee defined hereinafter.
3.    The WZO shall, in agreement with the Government, coordinate the activities in Israel of Jewish institutions and organizations operating with public funds within the sphere of the functions of the WZO.
4.    The WZO may carry out any of its functions through its own departments and institutions under its control, and it may enlist in its activities the cooperation of other institutions, provided that it shall not delegate any of its functions or rights according to this Covenant and shall not authorize any body or institution to carry out its functions, wholly or partly, without the prior written consent of the Government.
5.    The WZO shall be responsible for the mobilization of financial and material resources required for the execution of its functions and mainly derived from contributions, donations, grants and bequests and devises from communities all over the world, from the income of investments and from loans.
6.    The Government shall consult with the WZO with regard to legislation specifically affecting the functions of the WZO before such legislation’ is submitted to the Knesset.
7.    There is hereby established a Coordinating Committee for the purpose of coordinating activities between the Government and the WZO for the avoidance of duplication in all the fields covered by this Covenant (hereinafter referred to as – "The Committee"). The Prime Minister shall be the Chairman of the Committee and in his absence – the Chairman of the Executive of the WZO.

The Committee shall consist of an even number of members, not less than four, half of whom shall be members of and appointed by the Government and half of whom shall be members and appointed by the WZO. The Government and the WZO shall be entitled from time to time to replace members of the Committee appointed by them respectively and to appoint others in their stead, provided that the new members shall be members of the Government and of the Executive of the WZO, as the case may be.

8.    The Committee shall meet at least thtimes a year and shall have the power to appoint sub-committees consisting of its own members and/or of other persons.

The Committee shall from time to time submit to the Government and to the WZO reports of its deliberations and recommendations, subject to the foregoing provisions. The Committee shall determine its own rules of procedure.

9.    The Government undertakes to see to it that its ministries and competent authorities provide the WZO, its Funds and other Institutions defined in the Annex to this Covenant with all permits and facilities required by law for the carrying out of the activities specified in this Covenant.
10.    All contributions, gifts, grants, devices and bequests to the WZO or to any of its Funds and other institutions defined in the Annex to this Covenant wholly or partly, shall be exempt from all taxes and compulsory charges.

Furthermore, the WZO and its aforementioned Funds and other institutions shall be exempt from all taxes and other compulsory government charges specified in the Annex to this Covenant, subject to the limitations and conditions stated in the said Annex.

11.    Any proposed change or amendment to this Covenant or its Annex, or any addition thereto, shall be made in writing and shall require the consent of the Government and the WZO.
12.    The Covenant between the Government of Israel and the Zionist Executive, also called the Executive of the Jewish Agency for Israel, entered into in 5714-1954, is repealed.
13.    This Covenant shall become effective as of the 28th ofSivan 573l (June21, 1971).

ANNEX
to the Covenant between the Government of Israel and the World Zionist Organization

1.    In this Annex:

"The WZO" – including its Funds and other Institutions. "The Funds and other Institutions of the WZO" means –

1.    Keren Hayesod – the United Israel Appeal.
2.    The Jewish National Fund.
3.    Companies for the benefit of the public under the Charitable Trusts Ordinance exclusively controlled by WZO.
4.    Any corporation wholly owned and controlled by the WZO and/or by any of the Funds and other Institutions mentioned above, wholly or partly, which is non-profit-making or whose activities and/or properties are exclusively devoted to the achievement of the purposes of the WZO and/or of the said Funds and Institutions; provided that in the event of the winding up of any such corporation all its residual assets shall be transferred to the WZO or to any such Fund or Institutions as aforesaid:

In this sub-clause ?
"corporation" means any company, association or other legal entity exclusively controlled by the WZO or by all or any of the aforementioned Funds and Institutions, wholly or partly.

1.    Subject to the following limitations and conditions, the WZO shall be exempt from the taxes and compulsory government charges bear income wholly devoted to the achievement of its purposes.

2.    Fees under the Land (Fees) Regulations, 5735-1975.
3.    Land appreciation tax and additional tax under the Land Appreciation Tax Law, 5723-1963.
4.    Loans imposed by law.
5.    Income tax and capital gains tax under the Income Tax Ordinance and any other tax imposed on income; provided that the exemption shall not apply to dividend or interest on debentures paid to the WZO by a company engaged in any commerce, trade or business, for the purpose of the settlement of Israel or the absorption of immigrants.
6.    Fees under the Companies (Fees and Forms) Regulations, 5736-1976, imposed according to clauses 1,2(a), 2(b), 2(d), 3, 5, 6, 8 and 9 of the First Schedule, provided that the exemption shall only apply:

1.    In the case of a company with capital stock – it applies only with regard to the fee whose relation to the entire fee is proportional to the share of the WZO, its Funds and its other Institutions, in the capital stock of the company relative to the entire capital stock.
2.    In the case of a company without capital stock – it applies only with regard to the part of the fee whose relations to the entire fee which is proportional to the number of members of the company who are from the WZO, its Funds and other Institutions relative to the total number of members.

2.    Stamp duty under the Stamp Duty on Documents Law, 5721-1961, on the following documents:

1.    Debentures issued by the WZO, the redemption of which is guaranteed by the State of Israel.
2.    The transfer or assignment to the WZO of shares in a company controlled by not more than five persons, and mainly concerned with the acquisition and holding of land.
3.    Guarantees of debts of the WZO and guarantees given by the WZO of debts of bodies in whose budgets the WZO participates.

2.    License fees under the Traffic Ordinance for vehicles other than private motor vehicles, of the WZO and its Funds and other Institutions.

1.    The Himnuta Co., Ltd. is exempt from taxes and from compulsory Government charges imposed by the enactments detailed in clauses 2(a), 2(b), 2(c), 2(d), 2(e) – with regard to income accrued by its land transactions and 2(g)(1), accordingly, under the limitations and conditions detailed in said clauses.
2.    The exemptions specified in this Annex are in addition to and not in derogation of exemptions under the law.

And in witness thereof done and signed in Jerusalem on the third day of the month of Tamuz, 5739 (the 28th day of June, 1979).
 
Arye L. Dulzin
The World Zionist organization
 
Menachem Begin
Prime Minister of Israel
Appendix No. 15
Covenant between the Government of Israel and the Jewish Agency for Israel
(Unofficial Translation)
COVENANT
Entered into pursuant to the World Zionist Organization and Jewish Agency for Israel (Status) Law, 5713-1952 (hereinafter referred to as "the Law of Status")
BETWEEN
The Government of Israel (hereinafter referred to as "the Government")
AND
The Jewish Agency for Israel (hereinafter referred to as "the Jewish Agency")
WHEREAS
The Government is desirous to enhance the activities of the Jewish Agency and the Jewish Agency desires to cooperate and to act in full coordination with the State of Israel and its Government, in accordance with the laws of the State
NOW THEREFORE this Covenant is hereby entered into:

1.    The functions of the Jewish Agency are as follows:

1.    The organization of immigration abroad and the transferring of immigrants and their property to Israel.
2.    Participation in immigrants’ housing and in their absorption in agriculture, industry, trades and professions.
3.    Health services in connection with immigration and absorption and to the underprivileged.
4.    Youth Aliya and youth care and training.
5.    Maintenance and support of cultural, educational, scientific, religious, sports and social service institutions and activities therein.
6.    Maintenance and support of institutions of higher education and research institutes.
7.    The care of aged, disabled, handicapped and other persons in need of assistance and social services.
8.    Generally to engage by itself or in cooperation with other institutions in any activities designed to help immigrants and needy persons to become integrated in the life of the community in Israel.

1.    Any activity carried out in Israel by or on behalf of the Jewish Agency for the purpose of performing all or any of the aforementioned functions shall be carried out in accordance with the laws of the State of Israel applicable from time to time, including administrative directions in force from time to time with regard to the governmental authorities whose jurisdiction includes or is relevant to the activity in question.
2.    In the organization of immigration and the handling of immigrants, the Jewish Agency shall act on the basis of plans agreed upon in advance with the Government or recommended by the Coordinating Committee defined hereinafter.
3.    The Jewish Agency shall, in agreement with the Government, coordinate the activities in Israel of Jewish institutions and organizations operating with public funds within the sphere of the functions of the Jewish Agency.
4.    The Jewish Agency may carry out any of its functions through its own departments and institutions under its control, and it may enlist in its activities the cooperation of other institutions, provided that it shall not delegate any of its functions or rights hereunder and shall not authorize any body or institutioto carry out its functions, wholly or partly, without the prior written consent of the Government.
5.    The Jewish Agency shall be responsible for the mobilization of financial and material resources required for the execution of its functions and mainly derived from contributions, donations, grants and bequests from communities all over the world, from the income of investments and from loans.
6.    The Government shall consult with the Jewish Agency with regard to legislation specifically affecting the functions of the Jewish Agency before such legislation is submitted to the Knesset.
7.    There is hereby established a Coordinating Committee (hereinafter referred to as – "The Committee") for the purpose of coordinating activities between the Government and the Jewish Agency in all the fields covered by this Covenant.

The Committee shall consist of an even number of members, not less than four (4), half of whom shall be members of and appointed by the Government and half of whom shall be members of and appointed by the Executive of the Jewish Agency. The Government and the Jewish Agency shall be entitled from time to time to replace members of the Committee appointed by them respectively and to appoint others in their stead, provided that the new members shall be members of the Government or of the Executive of the Jewish Agency, as the case may be.

8.    The Committee shall meet at least once a month and shall have the power to appoint sub-committees consisting of its own members and/or of other persons. The Committee shall from time to time submit to the Government and to the Jewish Agency reports of its deliberations and recommendations. Subject to the foregoing provisions. the Committee shall determine its own rules of procedure.
9.    The Government undertakes to see to it that its ministries and competent authorities provide the Jewish Agency and its Funds and other Institutions defined in the Annex hereto with all permits and facilities required by law for the carrying out of the activities specified herein.
10.    All contributions, gifts, grants, donations and bequests to the Jewish Agency or to any of its Funds and other Institutions defined in the Annex hereto shall be exempt from all taxes and compulsory charges.

Furthermore, the Jewish Agency and its aforementioned Funds and other Institutions shall be exempt from all taxes and other compulsory government charges specified in the Annex hereto, subject to the limitations and conditions stated in the said Annex.

11.    Any proposed change or amendment to this Covenant or its Annex, or any addition thereto, shall be made in writing and shall require the consent of the Government and the Jewish Agency.
12.    The Covenant between the Government of Israel and the Zionist Executive, also called the Executive of the Jewish Agency for Israel, entered into in 1954, is hereby repealed.
13.    This Covenant shall be deemed to be in force and effect as of 28th of Sivan 5731 (June 21,1971).

Done and signed in Jerusalem on the 3rd day of Tamouz, 5739 (the 28th day of June, 1979).
 
The Government of Israel
by
Menachem Begin Prime Minister
by
Chairman of the
Executive
Arye (Leon) Dulzin
 
The Jewish Agency for Israel
by
Chairman of the
Board of Governors
Max M. Fisher
 
ANNEX
to the Covenant between the Government of Israel and the Jewish Agency for Israel

1.    In this Annex:

"The Jewish Agency" – including its Funds and other Institutions. "The Funds and other Institutions of the Jewish Agency" means –

1.    The United Jewish Appeal, Inc.;
2.    The United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York, Inc.;
3.    The United Israel Appeal, Inc.;
4.    The United Israel Appeal of Canada – Hamagbit Hameuchedet Le Israel d’Canada Inc.;
5.    The Joint Israel Appeal of Great Britain;
6.    Companies for the benefit of the public under the Charitable Trusts Ordinance exclusively controlled by the Jewish Agency.
7.    Any corporation wholly owned and controlled by the Jewish Agency and/or by any of the Funds and other Institutions mentioned above, which is non-profit-making or whose activities and/or properties are exclusively devoted to the achievement of the purposes of the Jewish Agency and/or of the said Funds and Institutions; provided that in the event of the winding up of any such corporation all its residual assets shall be transferred to the Jewish Agency or to any such Fund or Institutions as aforesaid;

In this sub-clause –
"corporation" means any company, association or other legal entity exclusively controlled by the Jewish Agency or by all or any of the aforementioned Funds and Institutions.

1.    Subject to the undermentioned limitations and conditions, the Jewish Agency shall be exempt from the following taxes and compulsory government charges imposed by or in accordance with the undermentioned enactments:

1.    Property tax and compensations fund, under the Property Tax and Compensation Fund Law, 1961, on those of its properties serving its purposes which bear no income or which bear income wholly devoted to the achievement of its purposes;
2.    Fees under the Land (Fees) Regulations, 5735-1975;
3.    Land appreciation tax and additional tax under the Land Appreciation Tax Law, 1963;
4.    Compulsory loans imposed by Law;
5.    Income tax and capital gains tax under the Income Tax Ordinance and any other tax imposed on income; provided that the exemption shall not apply to dividend or interest on debentures paid to the Jewish Agency by a company engaged in any commerce, trade or business, unless such company is so engaged for the purpose of the settlement of Israel or the absorption of immigrants;
6.    Fees under the Companies (Fees and Forms) Regulations, 1976, clauses 1, 2(a), 2(b), 2(d), 3, 5, 6, 8 and 9 of the First Schedule, provided that the exemption shall only apply –

1.    In the case of a company with a share capital – in the proportion of the part of the Jewish Agency and its Funds and other Institutions in such share capital;
2.    In the case of a company without a share capital – in the proportion of the part of the Jewish Agency and its Funds and other Institutions in the membership of the company;

1.    Stamp duty under the Stamp Duty on Documents Law, 1961, on the following:

1.    Debentures issued by the Jewish Agency, the redemption of which is guaranteed by the State of Israel;
2.    The transfer or assignment to the Jewish Agency of shares in a company controlled by not more than five persons, and mainly concerned with the acquisition and holding of land.
3.    Guarantees of debts of the Jewish Agency and guarantees by the Jewish Agency of debts of bodies in whose budgets the Jewish Agency participates.

1.    License fees under the Traffic Ordinance for vehicles other than private motor vehicles, of the Jewish Agency and its Funds and other Institutions.

1.    The exemptions specified in this Annex are in addition to and not in derogation of exemptions under the law.

Appendix No. 16
 
Agreement for the Reconstitution of the Jewish Agency for Israel
PREAMBLE
WHEREAS:

1.    In accordance with the World Zionist Organization – Jewish Agency (Status) Law, 5713-1952, and the Covenant entered into thereunder between the Government of Israel and the Executive of the Jewish Agency for Israel dated July 26,1954, the World Zionist Organization (WZO) has undertaken certain tasks set forth therein, and more particularly the responsibility for bringing Jewish immigrants and refugees into Israel and for their resettlement, rehabilitation and absorption into the country.
2.    The WZO has for many years acted also as The Jewish Agency for Israel.
3.    Jewish communities throughout the free world have with great devotion and selfless dedication evidenced their deep concern for the welfare of their fellow Jews everywhere and have contributed generously large financial means in order to meet the urgent and continuing needs of immigration, resettlement and absorption.
4.    The historic task of repatriating to the State of Israel all homeless, persecuted Jews seeking refuge in their historic Home, and their resettlement therein as free and self-supporting human beings, will continue to require ever-increasing efforts on the part of Jewish communities throughout the world.
5.    The organizations signatory to this Agreement which in the past served as the principal instrumethrough which the financial participation of Jewish communities outside of Israel for the work of rescue, relief and rehabilitation and their resettlement in Israel was channeled, are determined to intensify their service and to secure ever-increasing cooperation on the part of all Jews throughout the world who share a sense of dedication to these tasks.
6.    The WZO seeks to obtain the active participation of Jews throughout the world in the work of rescue, rehabilitation, resettlement and reconstruction in Israel and to share with them the responsibility for the planning and the execution of these tasks.
7.    In the firm belief that sharing of responsibility of planning and implementing the aforesaid tasks will strengthen the bonds existing between the Jewish people in Israel and the Jewish communities everywhere and will serve the best interest of all concerned.
8.    The WZO has invited the organizations signatory to this Agreement to join with it, and with each other, in the reconstruction of the Jewish Agency for Israel on a broader basis for the purpose of continuing the tasks referred to above, and for the mobilization of the resources required in connection herewith.

 
THEREFORE, The World Zionist Organization and the organizations signatory hereto have agreed as follows:

A.    THE WORLD ZIONIST ORGANIZATION AND THE JEWISH AGENCY FOR ISRAEL

1.    The WZO agrees to the reconstitution of the Jewish Agency for Israel (Agency) in the manner herein provided. From the effective date of this Agreement as herein provided, "The Jewish Agency for Israel" shall mean the body reconstituted in accordance with the provisions of this Agreement, and is the body which enjoys the Status under the provisions of the World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency for Israel (Status) Law, 5713-1952, which became effective on the 1st of January 1976, retroactively from the 21st of June, 1971.
2.    The WZO and its institutions will continue as the organs of the Zionist Movement for the fulfillment of Zionist programs and ideals.
3.    Except with respect to activities and facilities which the Government of Israel is by law obliged to furnish, the Agency will undertake the following functions:

1.    Immigration to and absorption of immigrants in Israel.
2.    Social Welfare Services in connection with immigration and absorption.
3.    Health Services in connection with immigration and absorption.
4.    Education.
5.    Institutions of higher learning and research.
6.    Youth care and training
7.    Fostering regional development and creation of centers of employment in peripheral areas for the absorption of ohm and for their social and community integration in urban and rural sectors and absorption in agricultural settlement.
8.    Immigrant housing.
9.    Such other functions and tasks as the Agency may deem necessary or advisable.
4.    The functions and tasks and programs administered by the Agency, or to which it may contribute funds, shall be only such as may be carried on by tax-exempt organizations.
5.    As of the effective date of this agreement, the WZO and the Agency shall each have their own governing bodies.
B.    THE RECONSTITUTED JEWISH AGENCY FOR ISRAEL

1.    The Agency, as reconstituted in pursuance of this Agreement, shall consist of the designees of the following:

1.    The World Zionist Organization.
2.    The organizations signatory to this Agreement.
3.    Such other organizations, as referred to in paragraph 5 of the Preamble, as may from time to time be given the right by the Assembly to appoint designees.
2.    The governing bodies of the Agency shall be the Assembly, the Board of Governors and the Executive.
3.    THE ASSEMBLY

1.     

1.    The Assembly shall be designated as follows:

a.    50% of the total number of members shall be designated by the WZO on behalf of itself and the Jewish people in Israel:
b.    30% of the total of members shall be designated by the United Israel Appeal, Inc. New York, as representing the Jewish Community in the United States;
c.    20% of the total number of members to represent Jewish communities in countries and areas other than Israel and the United States (hereinafter referred to as "Keren Hayesod Countries"), to be designated in accordance with the distribution set forth in Annex A June 1994 attached hereto and made a part hereof.
2.    The Assembly shall consist of not more than 518 members, designated as follows:

a.    50% of the total number of members, namely 259 persons, shall be designated by the WZO.
b.    30% of the total number of members, namely 155 persons, shall be designated by the United Israel Appeal, Inc.,
c.    20% of the total number of members, namely 104 persons, to represent Keren Hayesod Countries shall be designated in accordance with the distribution set forth in Annex A attached hereto and made a part hereof.
3.     

a.    The presence of 30% of each of the groups referred to in subsection (a)(i) and (ii) and (iii) of this paragraph shall be required to constitute a quorum of the Assembly.
b.    For purposes of the First Assembly a quorum shall consist of 44 members of the group referred to in subsection (b)(i), 27 members of the group referred to in subsection (b)(ii) and 18 members of the group referred to in subsection (b)(iii), respectively of this paragraph.
4.    The Board of Governors shall establish the total number of members and a number of alternate members no less than the total number of members which shall always be an even number, to be designated in accordance with the provisions of Article lI.C.1(a) of the Agreement for the Reconstitution of the Jewish Agency. This action shall be taken by the Board of Governors not less than three (3) months prior to the meeting of the Assembly. If the Board of Governors fails to take such action in any one year, the numerical composition of the ensuing Assembly shall be the same as the last Assembly.
2.     

1.    Each member of the Assembly, designated as above, or an alternate member in his stead appointed in accordance with the provisions of Article C 1 (d) above, shall have one vote, shall serve for a period of one year or until the next annual meeting of the Assembly, and shall serve without compensation. A member of the Assembly or an alternate member is eligible for redesignation to serve succeeding terms.
2.    Between meetings of the Assembly, the designating organization shall have the right to fill a vacancy in membership of the Assembly created by death, resignation or inability to serve.
3.    Each designating organization shall submit the list of its designated members and alternates to the Secretary of the Agency at least two months prior to the date set for the ensuing meeting of the Assembly.
4.     

1.    An alternate shall assume the functions of a member of the Assembly if the member does not attend the Assembly or ceases to participate in any session thereof. In the latter case, the alternate assumes his functions from the moment at which the member ceases to take part until the time the member resumes his participation, if at all.
2.    A notification to the effect that a member will not take part in the Assembly or ceases to participate, shall be given to the Secretary of the Agency by the member himself and bear his signature. If no such notification was received from the member, it shall be given by the designating organization of the member.
5.     

1.    The Assembly shall meet once a year at a time and place determined by the Board of Governors.
2.    A special meeting of the Assembly may be convened for such purposes and at such time and place as the Board of Governors shall determine. The Chairman of the Assembly and the Chairman of the Board of Governors, acting jointly, may convene a special meeting of the Assembly at such time and place as they shall determine.
3.     

a.    Twenty-five percent (25%) of the members of the Assembly shall have the right to cause a special session of the Assembly to be convened by giving ten (10) days written notice of their intention to the Secretary of the Assembly, setting forth the specific subjects which shall be on the agenda of such special session.
b.    A special session shall thereupon be convened within forty-five (45) days from the date of such notice to deal with the specific items suggested in the request for the special session.
6.    The functions of the Assembly shall be:

1.    To receive andreview reports from the Board of Governors;
2.    To make recommendations on major
3.    To determine basic policies and goals of the Agency;
4.    To review and act upon budgets submitted by the Board of Governors;
5.    To determine priorities and directions of the next annual budget and future budgets of JAFI;
6.    To adopt resolutions on the above;
7.    To elect the Board of Governors.
7.    The officers selected by the Assembly from among its members shall be its Chairman, the Treasurer, and such additional officers as the Assembly may determine from time to time. A committee on nominations, composed in the same proportion as the Assembly, shall be appointed to recommend candidates for office of Chairman, Treasurer, and such other officers as the Assembly may determine.
8.    The Assembly shall establish its own rules of procedures.
4.    THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS

1.     

1.    The Board of Governors determines the policy of the Jewish Agency for Israel and manages, supervises, controls and directs its operations and activities.

All bodies (other than the Assembly), officers and officials of the Jewish Agency shall act within the policies set by the Assembly and the Board of Governors and are accountable to the Board of Governors:
Between meetings of the Assembly, the Board of Governors shall have full power to act for the Agency and may fix policy, provided that its acts and decisions are not inconsistent with previous decisions or instructions of the Assembly.

2.    The Board of Governors shall have the power to appoint a Standing Budget and Finance Committee.
3.    The Board of Governors approves and determines the Annual Budget of the Jewish Agency for Israel in accordance with the provisions of Clause ll.F.2. hereinafter.
4.    The Board of Governors elects Members of the Executive in accordance with the provisions of clause lI.E. hereinafter.
5.    The Board of Governors receives and considers reports of the Executive.
1.     

1.    The Board of Governors consists of persons elected by the Assembly from among its members as follows:

a.    50% from among Members of the Assembly designated by the WZO.
b.    30% from among Members of the Assembly designated by the United Israel Appeal, Inc. ("the UIA").
c.    20% from among Members of the Assembly designated by Keren Hayesod organizations.
2.    In accordance with the ratios determined in subsection (a) above, the Board of Governors shall consist of:

a.    60 Governors from among Members of the Assembly designated by the WZO substantially in the manner set forth in Annex B attached hereto and made a part hereof.
b.    36 Governors from among Members of the Assembly designated by the UIA substantially in the manner set forth in Annex C attached hereto and made a part hereof.
c.    24 Governors for among Members of the Assembly designated by Keren Hayesod organizations substantially in the manner set forth in Annex D attached hereto and made a part hereof.
3.    Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (a) above and in addition to the Governors referred to in subsection (b) above, the Founding Chairman of the Board of Governors shall serve as a life-Member of the Board of Governors and the provisions of Section 12 herein concerning the filling of vacancies shall not apply.
4.    Associate non-voting members of the Board of Governors may be appointed as follows:

a.    Up to 5 Israelis serving as professionals in JAFI may be appointed by the WZO as Associate non-voting Members of the Board of Governors.
b.    Up to 5 professionals of Jewish Federations and Jewish Communities around the world may be appointed by the UIA and the Keren Hayesod, in a manner to be decided jointly by these two bodies, as Associate nonvoting Members of the Board of Governors.
2.     

1.    The Governors referred to in section 2(b)(i) and (ii) above shall be elected by the Assembly to serve for a period of four years or until their successors are elected.
2.    The Governors referred to in section 2(b)(iii) above shall be elected by the Assembly to serve for a period of two years, so that the principle of rotation may be applied as equitably as possible with respect to Governors so elected, or until their successors are elected.
3.    Elections pursuant to subsections (a) and (b) shall take place on a date to be determined by the Chairman of the Assembly during the Assembly session at which they are to be held.
4.    Subject to the provisions of subsection 2(c) above the Governors shall retire from office on the day on which new Governors are elected in accordance with the provisions of subsection (c).
3.     

1.    The Board of Governors shall, at its first session held after the election of all its members, elect its chairman from among the Governors referred to in section 2(b)(ii) and (iii).

A nominating committee selected by the Board of Governors for this purpose shall make recommendations for the office of the Chairman.
The Chairman of the Board of Governors, or in his absence, the Chairman of the Budget and Finance Committee of the Board of Governors, shall preside at every meeting of the Board of Governors.

2.    The Chairman of the Board of Governors shall serve for a four-year term.
3.    Until the Chairman of the Board of Governors is elected, the retiring Chairman of the Board of Governors shall act as Acting Chairman and shall convene the first session of the Board of Governors to be held after election of its Members has taken place.
4.    In the event that the office of the Chairman of the Board of Governors becomes vacant by reason of death, resignation, incapacity or inability to serve, the Board of Governors shall elect from among members of the Assembly designated by the Organization which had designated the Chairman whose office became vacant, a Chairman who shall serve for the unexpired term of office mentioned in subsection (b) above.
4.     

1.    The Board of Governors shall hold not less than four regular sessions in each calendar year, at such times and places as shall be determined by the Chairman of the Board of Governors; provided that one of such regular sessions shall be held during, or in immediate proximity to, every Assembly session and provided further that not less than three regular sessions are held in Israel.
2.    The Chairman of the Board of Governors may convene, whenever he thinks fit, an extraordinary meeting of the Board of Governors for such purpose and at such time and place as he shall determine.

The Chairman of the Board of Governors shall convene an extraordinary meeting of the Board of Governors upon the requisition in writing of not less than 20% of the total Members of the Board of Governors. Any such requisition shall express the object of the meeting proposed to be called and shall be left at the Office of the Secretary-General of the Jewish Agency for Israel.

6.     

1.    40% of the Governors, referred to in section 2(b)(i), together with 40% of the Governors, referred to in sections 2(b) (ii) and (iii), present in person, shall be a quorum at any meeting of the Board of Governors, whether held during a regular session or held as an extraordinary meeting.
2.    If within 30 minutes from the time appointed for any meeting, a quorum is not present, the Chairman of the Board of Governors shall adjourn the meeting for not less than 48 hours. If at the adjourned meeting a quorum is not present within 15 minutes from the time appointed for such adjourned meeting, 30% of each of the three groups mentioned in section 2(b) above, shall be a quorum and in such case, notwithstanding the provisions of section 7 hereinafter, action shall be taken by an affirmative vote of at least 75% of those present and voting.
7.     

1.    Actions of the Board of Governors shall be taken by a majority of those present and voting. In counting the votes, only votes for or against a resolution shall be taken in consideration and abstentions shall be disregarded.
2.    A resolution put to the vote of any meeting of the Board of Governors shall be decided on a show of hands or voice vote, unless a poll is demanded by the Chairman of the Board of Governors or by not less than 20% of the Governors present.
3.    Unless a poll is so demanded, a declaration by the Chairman of the Board of Governors that a resolution has been carried or lost, and an entry to that effect in the minutes of the meeting, shall be conclusive evidence of the fact.
4.    If a poll demanded it shall be taken in such a manner as the Chairman of the Board of Governors shall direct and the result of the poll shall be deemed to be the resolution of the meeting at which the poll was demanded.
8.    The Governors shall not be compensated for their services as such.
9.     

1.    The Chairman of the Board of Governors, in consultation with the Chairman of the Executive, shall have the power to appoint, from time to time, Standing or Ad-hoc Committees from among the Governors and other Assembly Members, and shall determine the scope of their functions.

[Amendment June 1994 to become effective after the next Zionist Congress but not later than December 31, 1997

2.     

a.    Without derogating from the above, the Board of Governors shall have three Committees for Departments of the Jewish Agency and the Eastern Europe Committee (‘The Four Committees’) as follows:

1.    The Department Committee for Aliyah and Klitah
2.    The Department Committee for Rural and Urban Development
3.    The Department Committee for Youth Aliyah
4.    The Committee for Eastern Europe

a.    Each of these four Committees shall be chaired by two equal Co-Chairmen, one designated by the Chairman of the Executive in consultation with the Chairman of the Board from among the Members of the Executive elected in accordance with section E.3(b)(i) below, and one designated by the Chairman of the Board in consultation with the Chairman of the Executive from among the Members of the Board of Governors designated by UIA or Keren Hayesod.
b.    The Chairman of the Board of Governors, in consultation with the Chairman of the Executive shall appoint, from among the Governors and other Assembly members, members of the Four Committees.
c.    The Co-Chairmen of the Four Committees will function according to past practice for Chairmen of Department Committees of the Board of Governors.
d.    The Co-Chairman of the Department Committee for Rural and Urban Development who shall be designated from among the Members of the Executive, shall be someone other than the Head of the WZO Division of Rural Settlement.]

1.    Each Committee Chairman shall report to the Board of Governors, at such times as shall be determined by the Board of Governors, of his Committee’s findings, conclusions, and recommendations.

1.    The Board of Governors shall elect the Comptroller of the Jewish Agency and determine the scope of his activities.
2.    The Board of Governors may from time to time make such general Regulations for the conduct of the affairs of the Jewish Agency and the administration of its activities (to be termed "the By-laws of the Jewish Agency for Israel"), as it may deem necessary.
3.    Any vacancy occurring in the Board of Governors by reason of death, resignation, incapacity or inability to serve or by reason of a Governor ceasing to be a Member of the Assembly, may be filled by the other Governors, from among Members of the Assembly designated by the Organization which had designated the Governor whose place became vacant.

The person elected to fill any vacancy shall June serve for the unexpired term created by such vacancy.

4.     

1.    Notwithstanding any other provision of this Agreement, or a provision in an existing service contract, the Board of Governors may remove any Member of the Board of Governors or of the Executive, including Members of the Executive who are members ex officio in accordance with section ll.E.3 below, before the expiration of their period of office as set forth in this Agreement, and elect another Member in his stead, provided there exists due cause for such removal.
2.    A decision to remove a Member of the Board of Governors or the Executive will be valid provided that (1) a written notice of 21 days has been given to all Members; (2) that the Member has been given adequate opportunity to make a statement in his defense, either in writing or orally to the Members of the Board; and (3) that the decision was accepted by a 2/3 majority of those Members present, provided that at least 75% of the total number of Members of the Board are present.
3.    The person elected to fill the vacancy created by the removal of. a Member under this Section, shall serve for the unexpired term created by such vacancy.
5.    The Board of Governors shall act, notwithstanding any vacancy occurring in its Members, and shall continue so to act and discharge its functions and exercise its powers in accordance with the provisions hereof.
6.    If by reason of war or of any other unexpected or unusual situation beyond the control of the Board of Governors (hereinafter "the State of Emergency") it shall be necessary in the opinion of both the Chairman of the Assembly and the Chairman of the Board of Governors (in this section "the Chairman") to deviate from the provisions of this Agreement, the following provisions shall apply:

1.    The said opinion shall be signed, or approved by letter, telegram or telex, by both Chairmen, and may consist of two separate documents.
2.    As long as the State of Emergency shall continue, or as long as it will not be possible, in the opinion of the Chairmen, to convene the Governing Bodies of the Jewish Agency in accordance with the provisions of this Agreement, the Members of the Executive present in Israel shall constitute the Executive (in this section "the Executive in Israel").
3.    All the powers, authorities and functions vested in the Board of Governors and the Executive, by virtue of this Agreement, shall vest in the Executive in Israel.
4.    The Executive in Israel shall, from time to time, fix the quorum at its meetings, the required majority and the method of voting thereat.
5.    Every Member of any of the Governing bodies of the Jewish Agency shall continue to serve as such until proper elections shall take place, in accordance with the provisions of this Agreement.
6.    A statement in writing of both Chairmen that the State of Emergency has come to an end shall be conclusive evidence of the fact, and shall be effective as of the date stipulated in said statement.
7.    At the termination of the State of Emergency as aforesaid, the Chairmen shall take all necessary steps for the reconvening of the Governing Bodies of the Jewish Agency in accordance with the provisions of this Agreement, and, if necessary for the election of the Members of the Board of Governors and Members of the Executive.
7.    The Board of Governors shall establish its own Rules of Procedure.

1.    THE EXECUTIVE

1.    The Executive shall administer the operations of the Jewish Agency, subject to the control of the Board of Governors.

Polices adopted by the Assembly and the Board of Governors shall be implemented by the Executive and the Departments under the direction of the Chairman of the Executive.
The Executive shall act as a collective body with collective responsibility.

2.     

1.    The Executive shall be composed of Members ex officio and of Members selected by the Board of Governors.
2.    Members of the Executive shall serve as such only as long as they are Members of the Board of Governors.
3.     

1.    The following holders of offices or positions shall be Members ex officio of the Executive while holding such offices or positions:

a.    The Chairman of the Assembly, who shall also serve as Chairman of the Executive
b.    The Chairman of the Board of Governors.
c.    The Founding Chairman of the Board of Governors, who shall serve as a life Member of the Executive.
d.    The Treasurer
e.    The Chairman of the Board of Governors Committee on Budget and Finance
f.    The Chairman of the UIA,lnc.
g.    The National Chairman of the UJA.
h.    The President of the United Jewish Appeal (UJA).
i.    The President of the Council of Jewish Federations (U.S.A.).
j.    The Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Keren Hayesod.
k.    The World Chairman of Keren Hayesod.
2.    The following Governors shall be Members at large of the Executive.

[Amendment June 1994 to become effective after the next Zionist Congress but not later than December 31, 1997: (i) six Members to be appointed by the WZO from among the Governors referred to in clause ILD. 2(b) (i).

a.    four Members, to be appointed by the WZO, from among the Governors referred to in clause ll.D. 2(b)(i).
b.    two Members to be appointed by Keren Hayesod Organizations, and who serve as Appeal Trustees on the World Board of Trustees of Keren Hayesod, provided however t, in the event that the Chairman of the Board of Governors and/or the Chairman of the Budget and Finance Committee be a Governor or Governors elected from among the Governors referred to in clause II D.(2)(b)(iii), then one or two Governors, as the case may be, shall be appointed in their place by the UIA as Members at large of the Executive from among the Governors referred to in clause II D.(2)(b)(ii)
c.    In the event that any of the Members ex officio of the Executive listed in paragraph (a) above shall hold more than one of the offices or positions set forth in items (i) through (xi), then the respective organization, either WZO, UIA Inc. or Keren Hayesod, shall appoint another Member to be a member at large of the Executive, provided that the appointment is limited to the period that more than one of those offices or positions is held by any of the said members ex officio of the Executive.
2.    The Chairman of the Assembly and the Treasurer shall serve for a period of four years, or until their successors are elected.

[Amendment June 1994 to become effective after next Zionist Congress but not later than December31, 1994 the followmg paragraphs 4, 5, 6 and 7 shall be deleted and paragraphs 8-15 shall be renumbered 4-11.]

4.    The Board of Governors shall elect to the Executive and as Heads of Departments:

1.    one Member, from among Members of the Assembly designated by the WZO to serve as Head of the Immigration and Absorption Department.
2.    one Member, from among Members of the Assembly designated by the WZO, to serve as Head of the Youth Aliyah Department.
5.     

1.    Elections pursuant to section 4 shall take place on a date to be determined by the Chairman of the Board of Governors during the Board of Governors session held during, or in immediate proximity to the Assembly session at which the Chairman of the Assembly and the Treasurer are to be elected.
2.    Heads of Departments elected as aforesaid shall:

a.    serve for a period ending on the Board of Governors session held during, or in immediate proximity to, the Assembly session at which the Chairman of the Assembly and the Treasurer shall retire.
b.    retire from office on the day at which elections of new Heads of Departments are to be held in accordance with subsection (a) above.
6.     

1.    Notwithstanding any provision herein before mentioned, the Board of Governors may, at the meeting at which Heads of Departments retire in manner aforesaid in section 5 above, resolve not to elect one or more of the persons mentioned in section 4 and not to fill any vacated office of Head of Department, and in such case the provisions of section 12 hereinafter shall apply.
2.    Should a Head of Department not be elected as aforesaid:

a.    The WZO shall have the power to appoint to the Executive one Member, from among the Governors referred to in clause ll.D.2(b)(i), who shall serve as a Member at large until a new Head of Department is elected pursuant to the provisions of section 7.
b.    The Chairman of the Executive shall assume, and, with the consent of the Chairman of the Board of Governors may delegate to a Member of the Executive, the functions of the Head of such Department until a new Head of Department is elected pursuant to the provisions of section 7.
7.    In the event that one or more of the persons mentioned in section 4 above are not elected to the Executive, the Chairman of the Board of Governors shall, by mutual consent with the Chairman of the Executive, set a date for election and in case any person is so elected, he shall serve as Head of Department for the unexpired term of office mentioned in section 5.
8.    Members of the Executive may be compensated for their services as such, in such manner as may be determined by the Board of Governors from time to time.
9.    The Board of Governors may, in its discretion, appoint Associate Members of the Executive, who shall serve on such terms and for such periods of time, and perform such duties and functions as the Board of Governors may from time to time determine. No more than six Associate Members shall serve at any time.

Associate Members shall have the right to attend all meetings of the Executive, but they shall not be entitled to vote.

10.     

1.    The Executive shall meet not less than once each month at such dates and places, either in Israel or abroad, as the Chairman of the Executive shall determine.
2.    The Board of Governors shall from time to time, by resolution, fix the quorum at the meetings of the Executive, the required majority and the method of voting thereat.

[Amendment June 1994 to become effective after next Zionist Congress, but not later than December 31, 1997
11. In the event that the office of the Chairman of the Executive or the Treasurer becomes vacant, the Board of Governors may elect an acting successor who shall serve in that capacity until a new successor is elected in accordance with the provisions thereof.]

11.    In the event that the office of the Chairman of the Executive, the Treasurer, or any Head of Department becomes vacant, the Board of Governors may elect an Acting Successor who shall serve in that capacity until a new successor is elected in accordance with the provisions hereof.

Such Acting Successor and successor shall be from among the Governors referred to in clause

12.    The Executive shall act, notwithstanding any vacancy occurring in its Members, and shall continue so to act and discharge its functions and exercise its powers in accordance with the provisions hereof.
13.     

1.    The Executive is empowered to exercise all the powers of the Agency to enter into contracts; to borrow money, to issue evidences of indebtedness, debentures, guarantees and other securities; to acquire, and dispose of, any property; to execute any document in respect of any matter whatsoever concerning the Jewish Agency and generally to represent the Agency and to act in its name and on its behalf.
2.    The Executive may delegate any of its powers to one or more of its Members.
3.    The Board of Governors may, by resolution, authorize from time to time the Executive or any Member thereof to delegate, with the power to sub-delegate, to any person who is not a member of the Executive, the power to act on behalf of the Agency in such manner and extent as the Board of Governors shall deem fit.
14.    The principal office of the Executive shall be located in Jerusalem. The Executive may, with the approval of the Board of Governors, establish and maintain offices in other parts of the world, as may be required for the efficient conduct of the affairs of the Agency.
15.    Subject to the provisions of section 10(b), the Executive shall prescribe and determine its own rules of procedure.
1.    FINANCES, BUDGETS AND CONTRACTUAL COMMITMENTS

1.    The financial resources at the disposal of the Agency for the conduct of its affairs shall be derived from allocations made to its programs and functions by the parties to this Agreement, from fund-raising activities for the benefit of its programs and functions by Keren Hayesod and others, from income on investments, from collection of debts, from grants by the Government of Israel, from borrowings, and from such other funds as it may receive by grant or otherwise from other sources.
2.    All expenditures by and on behalf of the Agency shall be in pursuance of a budget, which shall be determined in the following manner:

1.    The Executive shall each year prepare and submit to the Board of Governors the following;

a.    an estimate of receipts from all sources for the ensuing fiscal year;
b.    a "budget of needs" for the ensuing fiscal year;
c.    a detailed budget of recommended expenditures during the ensuing fiscal year.
2.    The Board of Governors shall review, examine and, if it sees fit, change or amend the estimate of receipts and the budget of expenditures submitted by the Executive, and shall determine the budget for the ensuing fiscal year, subject only to such changes and amendments as may be recommended by the Assembly at its next ensuing meeting.
3.    The Board of Governors may, between meetings of the Assembly, increase, reduce, change and amend any budget previously fixed as circumstances, in its judgment, may necessitate, and report to the Assembly the reasons for any such action.
3.    The Jewish Agency for Israel, as rstituted in pursuance of this Agreement, shall be an independent body whose membership consists solely of the persons designated to serve as member of the Assembly in the manner hereinabove set forth. The organizations’ signatory hereto are not, as such, members of the Jewish Agency for Israel. This Agreement does not create or imply the existence of any relationship of principal and agent between any of the signatories to this Agreement. To the extent that the Agency is designated as the Operating Agent for any of the signatories hereto such designation shall be made by separate agreements between the parties concerned.

A.     

1.    This Agreement shall go into effect and become operative on the 21st day of June, 1971.
2.    This Agreement may be executed in several counterparts, each of which shall be deemed to be an original, and such counterparts together shall constitute a single instrument binding upon all signatories.
3.    This Agreement may be amended by a two-thirds majority of those present and voting at the Assembly. Notification of proposed amendments shall be sent to all the Members of the Assembly, not less than 60 days prior to the Assembly meeting.

 
DONE AND SIGNED IN JERUSALEM, THE CAPITAL OF ISRAEL, ON
28 SIVAN 5731,21 JUNE 1971.
The Weizmann Hall, the Jewish Agency for Israel.
 
ADDENDUM
to the Agreement for the Reconstitution of the Jewish Agency for Israel
 

1.    This addendum is of equal validity and is an integral part of the Agreement for the Reconstitution of the Jewish Agency for Israel (hereinafter referred to as the "Agreement") dated as of the date hereof, as though fully set forth therein.
2.    With reference to subsection II D (6) of the Agreement, it is agreed that two of the meetings of the Board of Governors referred to in the said subsection shall be held each year in Israel and one meeting of the Board of Governors shall be held each year in a country other than Israel at such time and place as will be determined by the Board of Governors.
3.    It is understood that the Chairman of the W.Z.O. shall serve as the Chairman of the Assembly and the Executive of the Agency.
4.    It is agreed that only members of the Board of Governors designated by an organization other than the World Zionist Organization may serve as Chairman of the Board of Governors.

Signed in Jerusalem this 27th day of August 1970
 
The World Zionist Organization by (sgd) L.A. Pincus
The United Israel Appeal, Inc., by (sgd) Max M. Fisher
Annex A
 
Amendment June 1994
Distribution of members of the Assembly from Keren Hayesod countries:
Country
    No. of Delegates and Votes

1.   
Argentina

    5

Austria
    1

Australia
    4

Belgium
    4

Brazil
    4

Canada
    9

Central America
    1

Chile
    1

Colombia
    1

Denmark
    1

France
    9

Great Britain
    9

Holland
    1

Italy
    2

Mexico
    4

Peru
    1

South Africa
    7

Spain
    2

Sweden
    1

Switzerland
    4

Uruguay
    2

Venezuela
    2

Germany
    2

To be designed by Keren Hayesod Board of Trustees
    3

 
    80

To be designated by the Chairman of the World Board of Trustees and the World Chairman of Keren Hayesod, after consultation with their constituents
    24

 
    104
 
The Chairman of the Board of Governors and the Chairman of the Executive may, jointly, permit an increase in the number of the members of the Assembly designated from any country, provided that the aggregate number of votes allocated to any such country, as set forth above, shall not be changed by reason of any such increase.
Annex B
Amendment June 1994
Distribution of members of the Board of Governors designated bv the WZO
37 to be designated at the sole discretion of the WZO.
23 to be designated by the WZO and chosen from a wide range of segments of Israeli society, solely based on their individual merits, and consist of members designated from the following categories, all Israelis, except up to 6 or 7 from the final category who shall be Zionist Jewish leaders from the Diaspora:

1.    Industrialists and economists
2.    Mayors of development towns
3.    Settlement leaders
4.    Academicians
5.    Olim Associations and leaders of voluntary organizations
6.    Miscellaneous leaders

The Chairman of the Board of Governors and the Chairman of the Executive will exchange views on the 23 members of the Board being proposed by the WZO in accordance with the above.
Annex C
 
Amendment June 1994
Distribution of members of the Board of Governors desiynated by the UIA
22 to be designated at the sole discretion of the UIA.
14 to be designated by the UIA to include current leadership of large Jewish Federations and outstanding Jewish leaders, as well as other outstanding Jews prepared to be involved in the work of the Jewish Agency for Israel.
The Chairman of the Board of Governors and the Chairman of the Executive will exchange views on the 14 members of the Board being proposed by the UIA in accordance with the above.
Annex D
 
Amendment June 1994
Distribution of Members of the Board of Governors designated by Keren Hayesod
 

1.    English-speaking communities (excluding the U.S.A.)

Great Britain
    2

Canada
    3

Australia
    2

South Africa
    2

 
    9
2.      

3.    Europe*

France
    1

Switzerland
    1

Europe (rotating)
    1

 
    3
4.      

5.    Latin America* Argentina Latin America (rotating)

Argentina
    1

Latin America
    2

 
    3

 
     

 
    15
6.      

7.    Outstanding Jewish leaders from Keren Hayesod countries as well as other outstanding Jews from Keren Hayesod countries prepared to be involved in the work of the Jewish Agency for Israel; to be designated by the Chairman of the World Board of Trustees and the World Chairman of Keren Hayesod, after consultation with their constituents and after an exchange of views with the Chairman of the Board of Governors and the Chairman of the Executive

9
     
 
    24
 
* As required by changing conditions and considerations, keren Hayesod may make appointments to the Board from other countries, and in such cases, the membership listing shall be transferred from A, B or C to D.
Appendix No. 17
 
Report to the Board of Governors of the Jewish Agency for Israel on the Creation of a Joint Authority for Jewish-Zionist Education as amended by the Jewish Agency Assembly, June 28 1990 and the Jewish Education Authority Negotiation Committee, September 13, 1990

1.    Purposes and Guidelines

The desire of all parties is to reach an understanding regarding Jewish-Zionist education. All efforts to this end will be guided by the basic values that were adopted by the 1988 WZO Va’ad Hapoel and the Jewish Agency Assembly. These are the centrality of Israel, Zionist Realization and Aliyah, and the goals of Zionism and its ideology as integral components of educational activities. The WZO will be entrusted with the implementation of all WZO/JAFI funded Jewish-Zionist education programs and activities for Diaspora Jews.

2.    Structure

The Authority will be composed of two bodies: The Commission and the Executive.
The Commission will be the governing body. It will be responsible for policy planning, priority setting and budget approval.
The Commission will have thirty-six (36) members. It will be established on the basis of the 50-50 partnership between the WZO and UIA/KH. The eighteen (18) UIA/KH members will be appointed by the UIA/KH. The eighteen (18) WZO members will be elected by the WZO Executive which will include among them the Education Department Heads as full members of the Commission.
The Commission will have two Co-Chairmen, one from the WZO and one from UIA/KH.
The Executive will be chosen from among the Israeli members of the Commission. The Chairman of the Executive will serve as the WZO Co-Chairman of the Commission. The Executive will be responsible for implementation of program and budget and other areas as yet to be determined.
The Executive will consist of twelve (12) members. Two-thirds (2/3), eight (8) members, will be designated by the WZO, and one-third (1/3), four (4) members, will be designated by the UIA/KH.
All members of the Executive will have their primary place of residence in Israel.
The WZO members that will serve ex-officio are the WZO Co-
Chairman of the Commission, the WZO Treasurer, and the three (3)
Authority Department heads. The WZO will designate three (3)
additional members.
The Chairman of the Executive will have the authority to appoint a mof the Executive as Deputy Chairman of the Executive whose functions will be approved by the Commission at its first meeting.
The UIA/KH members will be designated by the UIA-KH from among their Israeli representatives to the Commission.
Should any decision be made in the future to change the number of members on the Executive, the 2/3 WZO – 1/3 UIA/KH ratio will remain the same.
The Co-Chairmen of the Commission will engage in non-binding consultation regarding the assignment of Department Heads. The entire Executive will be ratified "en bloc" by the Commission.

3.    The Director General

The director general of the Authority will be responsible to the Chairman of the Executive. He will operate under the Chairman’s direction and report to him.
He will be the senior director among other directors general, and in this capacity will be responsible for the administrative activities of the Authority.
The director general will have full administrative responsibility over all other departmental directors-general in administrative matters.
The director general in coordination with the departmental directors general, will submit the budget proposal to the Treasurer and Chairman of the Executive.
The director general will be responsible for the functioning of the General Administrative Services Unit.
The director-general will be appointed according to search committee procedures. A search committee, consisting of the Chairman of the Executive, the Chairman of the BOG, the Treasurer, the Chairman of the BOG Budget and Finance Committee, plus two others they will select, will become operational prior to November 1,1990.

4.    Regions

Regional representation on the Commission will be included through the WZO and UIA/KH 50-50 mechanism. Regions will not make appointments directly to the Commission.
The Authority will encourage input and involvement from the regions including regional advisory committees. The regions will propose their own structures, subject to approval by the Commission.

5.    Budget and Finance Procedures

1.     

1.    The departments will prepare their proposed budgets. The director general of the Authority in coordination with the departmental directors general, (as referred to in section 3 above) will submit the budget proposal to the Treasurer and the Chairman of the Executive. The Treasurer in consultation with the Chairman of the Executive, will prepare the budget and present it to the Executive. After the approval of the line by line budget by the Executive, the budget will be submitted to the Commission by the Treasurer and the Chairman of the Executive.
2.    The Commission will approve the detailed budget, including the map of shlichut and operations abroad.
3.    The Board of Governors of the Jewish Agency for Israel ("JAFI") will approve the budget framework of the Authority.
4.    The total amount of the framework of the budget of the Authority will be recommended to be at least the same amount as the current budget, and will continue to remain as part of the budgets of the World Zionist Organization and JAFI for their respective shares in the budget to be allocated to the Authority.
2.    Financial Administration

1.    There will be only one Treasury for the Authority which will be the Treasury Department of the WZO.
2.    The Treasury has the responsibility to appoint financial officers in the departments to oversee departmental fiscal matters.
3.    Review of Proposed Budgets and Administration of Approved Budgets

1.    Proposed budgets and administration of approved budgets will be subject to the review and recommendations of the Budget and Finance Subcommittee on Jewish Education of the Budget and Finance Committee of JAFI, which will reports its recommendations to the Commission. The subcommittee will have a deputy-chairman representing the WZO. The WZO Executive will recommend the WZO members to the subcommittee which will include members of the Va’ad Hapoel.
6.    Functional Departments

1.    The Authority will consist of three programmatic Departments, and a Unit for General Administrative Services.
2.    The three programmatic Departments will be as follows:

1.    The Department of Torah Education and Culture in the Diaspora

The main responsibility of this department will be the overall development and promotion of Torah and Zion oriented educational endeavors in the Diaspora and the formal day school system therein, including community schools, serving learning populations from preschool through post-high school and their families (excluding students), with the exception of those schools choosing to work with the department known as the General Department of Jewish Education and Culture in the Diaspora. The department will also deal with Talmudei Torah Torani’im.

2.    The General Department of Jewish Education and Culture in the Diaspora

The main responsibility of this department will be the overall development and promotion of Zionist-Jewish and Hebrew education and culture in the Diaspora, and the formal supplementary school system therein. The department will serve the general, secular, cultural and community day schools, religious schools – day and supplementary – of the Conservative, Reconstructionist and Reform movements and will develop religious and other educational programs for these constituencies. It will serve in all cases, learning populations from preschool through post high school and their families (excluding students), with the exception of those schools choosing to work with the Department of Torah Education and Culture in the Diaspora. The department will be responsible for Hebrew ulpanim.

3.    The Department of Youth and Hechalutz and Informal Education

The main responsibility of this department will be to deal with informal Zionist Jewish education of youth in Zionist youth movements, community and youth organizations of all ideological and religious streams. The department will also deal with all Israel programs in informal education frameworks. It will serve summer camps and community centers, as well as unaffiliated youth through informal Zionist educational activities in Zionist and community Federations, Boards of Jewish Education and Academic Institutions.

3.    Services rendered to educational institutions by the Departments will include supplementary programs in Israel, in-service training, curriculum and educational material development and the recruitment, assignment and supervisions of shlichim and educators (principals, specialists, teachers, youth and community center workers, etc.).
4.    The General Administrative Services Unit will coordinate the administrative functions of the Authority and provide service to all its departments. The Unit will be responsible among other things for the following:

1.    Research, development and evaluation.
2.    Logistics. (It is recommended that the logistics be located in the Department of Youth and Hechalutz and Informal Education, and will constitute the base for logistic services for the other departments.)
3.    A joint technical unit for producing and issuing educational materials (print and non-print) and for promotion and sales.
4.    A computerized information unit listing holdings of the pedagogic centers of the departments and other Jewish educational centers in Israel and the Diaspora.
5.    All JAFI Diaspora related educational activities and budget lines will be a part of the Authority. Their exact placement in the structure will be determined by the Commission.
6.    Administration

Each of the departments will have a director general and a financial officer provided by the Treasury. The directors general will be responsible to their respective department heads.
All department directors general will be recommended to the Executive by a search committee to be appointed by the two cochairmen of the Commission. The search committee will be constituted within the guidelines of the 50-50 WZO-UIA/KH partnership that forms the Commission. The candidate recommended by the search committee must be acceptable to the head of the department.
The current procedures relating to personnel will be maintained.
The current joint WZO-JAFI Shlichut Administration will serve the Authority according to existing procedures

8.    Establishment and Timetable

Submission of document to the WZO, UIA and KH.Sept. 30, 1990
     

1.   
Approval of the document by WZO, UIA and KH.

    Oct. 20

Submission to the BOG.
    Sept. 30

Approval by the BOG.
    Oct. 29

Ratification of the Commission.
    Oct. 29

Initial meeting of the Commission.
    Prior to Nov. 1

Appointment of the Executive.
    Prior to Nov. 1

Initial meeting of the Executive.
    Nov.

Hiring of the Director General.
    Jan. 10, 1991

Preparation of an operational plan and budget
    Feb. 10, 1991

Approval of operational plan and budget
    Feb. 21, 1991

Commencement of Activity.
    Apr. 1, 1991
 
Submitted September, 1990 – Tishrei, 5751 by the Jewish Education Authority Negotiating Committee of the Board of Governors, the Jewish Agency for Israel
Simcha Dinitz, Co-Chairman
Mendel Kaplan Co-Chairman
Mandell Berman Norman Lipoff
Shoshana Cardin Yehiel Leket
Trevor Chinn Yitzhak Mayer
Irwin Field Meir Sheetrit
Max Fisher Hank Skirball
Shlomo Gravitz Kalman Sultanik
Julia Koschitzky Joseph Wernik
 
THE JEWISH AGENCY FOR ISRAEL
1990 ASSEMBLY RESOLUTION
A Joint Jewish-Zionist Education Authority
WHEREAS, the World Zionist Organization Va’ad Hapoel of 1988 and 1989 and the Jewish Agency Assembly of 1988 and 1989 have joined in calling by resolution for the establishment of a Joint Jewish-Zionist Education Authority, and
WHEREAS, the 1990 Jewish Agency Assembly has received, discussed and debated the report of the Jewish Education Commission, a copy of which is attached hereto,
BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED, that the Jewish Agency Assembly authorizes the establishment of a Joint Jewish-Zionist Education Authority on November 1,1990, based upon the report of the Jewish Education Commission which is hereby approved as amended by this body.
AND WHEREAS the WZO Va’ad Hapoel did not approve the Report of the Jewish Education Commission as amended, therefore
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that an appropriate group based on parity between WZO and UIA/KH will be appointed to negotiate in good faith and to resolve differences in the views of the constituent bodies (UIA/KH and WZO). The group will commence working immediately after the conclusion of the present Assembly and will submit its findings regarding the establishment of a Joint Jewish Zionist Education Authority for the approval of the constituent bodies and thereafter of the Board of Governors of JAFI at the meeting in October 1990.
Once approved, the Joint Education Authority will be established beginning November 1,1990.
If the constituent bodies do not approve an agreement by the October 1990 meeting of the Board of Governors of JAFI, or if the agreement is not then approved by the Board of Governors of JAFI, each of the constituent bodies of JAFI may consider such action as they deem appropriate with respect to Jewish Education.
 
Approved
June 28,1990
Tammuz 5, 5750
Jerusalem
Appendix No. 18
 
Covenant between the State of Israel and the Keren Kayemeth LeIlsrael*
Signed on 28th November, 1961
THIS IS THE COVENANT MADE THIS DAY IN JERUSALEM BETWEEN THE STATE OF ISRAEL, REPRESENTED FOR THIS PURPOSE BY THE MINISTER OF FINANCE, AND KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL – WITH THE SANCTION OF THE WORLD ZIONIST ORGANIZATION – REPRESENTED FOR THIS PURPOSE BY THE CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL.

1.    Since its inception more than half a century ago, Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel has been engaged in acquiring land in Palestine and transferring it to the ownership of the people, reclaiming and afforesting land, leasing out land for settlement and housing, and administering its lands. The fundamental principle of Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael is that its lands shall not be sold, but shall remain the property of the people and shall be given on lease only.
2.    After the establishment of the State, the volume of the acquisition of land by Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael from non-Jewish owners has decreased, while the extent of the redemption of land from desolation has steadily increased. The State had become the owner of most of the land in Israel, and the Government administers and develops these domains.
3.    The Government of Israel and Keren Kayemeth LeIsrael have resolved to end the duplication resulting from the administration of their lands by different agencies, to concentrate the administration, conservation and care of these lands in the hands of the State, and to strengthen the hands of Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel in fulfilling its mission of redeeming land from desolation.

The parties to this Covenant have therefore agreed as follows:

1.    Upon the coming into force of the Basic Law: Israel Lands (hereinafter referred to as "the Law"), the administration of the lands which are State land or land of Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael, whether acquired in the past or to be acquired in the future, shall be concentrated in the hands of the State.
2.    The Government shall establish an "Israel Lands Administration" (hereinafter referred to as "the Administration") and shall, after consultation with Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael, appoint a Director to head the Administration. The Director shall be subordinate to the Minister charged by the Government with the implementation of this Covenant (hereinafter referred to as "the Minister").
3.    Notwithstanding the provision of clause 1, there shall be no change in the ownership of the lands as registered in the Land Registry, save to the extent that the parties to this Covenant agree, in respect of particular lands, to register them in the name of the State or in the name of Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael, either by way of exchange or in any other manner.
4.    Israel lands shall be administered in accordance with the law, that is to say, on the principle that land is not sold, but only given on lease, and in accordance with the land policy laid down by the Board established under clause 9. The Board shall lay down a land policy with a view to increasing the absorptive capacity of the land and preventing the concentration of lands in the hands of individuals. The lands of Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael shall, moreover, be administered subject to the Memorandum and Articles of Association of Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael.
5.    Where the Administration, in respect of a particular transaction, deems it necessary to deviate, in one or the other detail, from the principles of the land policy referred to in clause 4, such transaction shall only be made with the approval of the Board established under clause 9 and, where land registered in the name of Keren Kayemeth is concerned, with the consent of Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael or, where other Israel land is concerned, with the consent of the Minister.
6.    Any transaction in respect of Israel land shall be entered into by the Administration on behalf of and as the agent of the registered owner of such land, and any proceeds of Israel land shall be the property of the registered owner; and the State accepts, in consideration of this Covenant, to bear the expenses of the Administration.
7.    The Administration shall deliver to the registered owners of Israel land, once every three months (and for the first time at the expiration of six months from the day of the coming into force of the Law), a report of the income and expenditure of the administration of their land. The expenditure shall include a fixed amount determined by the Administration, either as a certain. percentage of the income or as a quota on a certain unit of measurement of the land. Upon the delivery of such a report, any balance appearing therein to the credit of Keren kayemeth Le’lsrael shall be regarded as a debt due to it and payable by the State, and any balance appearing therein to the debit of Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael shall be regarded as a debt due from it and payable to the State.
8.    The Administration shall deliver to the Government and to Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael, once a year, a report of all its activities.
9.    The Government shall establish a Board, under the chairmanship of the Minister, which shall lay down the land policy, approve the budget proposal of the Administration and supervise the activities of the Administration and the manner in which this Covenant is carried into effect. The number of the members of the Board shall be thirteen; hof them, less one, shall be appointed upon the proposal of Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael. The members of the Board may be replaced in the same way as they were appointed. Notice of the appointment of the Board and of the names of its members, as appointed from time to time, shall be published in Reshumot.
10.    The reclamation and afforestation of Israel lands shall be concentrated in the hands of Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael, which shall establish a "Land Development Administration" (hereinafter referred to as "the Development Administration") for that purpose. Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael shall, after consultation with the Minister, appoint a Director to head the Development Administration, who shall be subordinate to Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel.
11.    The Development Administration shall draw up once a year (and for the first time at the expiration of three months from the day of the coming into force of the Law) a scheme for the development and afforestation of Israel lands, and shall submit that scheme to the Government and to Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel. The scheme shall be drawn up in complete coordination with the Minister of Agriculture.
12.    The Afforestation Section of the Ministry of Agriculture shall henceforth engage in afforestation research only. However, the Minister of Agriculture shall continue to be charged with the implementation of the Forestry Ordinance, 1926, through the Development Administration.
13.    The Develpment Administration shall engage in operations of reclamation, development and afforestation of Israel lands as the agent of the registered owners; and Keren Kayemeth accepts in consideration of this Covenant, to bear the administrative expenses of the Development Administration.
14.    The expenditure involved in operations of reclamation, development and afforestation of Israel lands shall fall on the registered owners of the lands on which the operation is carried out; and the Develpment Administration shall deliver once every six months (and for the first time at the expiration of nine months from the day of the coming into force of the Law) a report to the registered owners of expenditure as aforesaid incurred in respect of their lands. Upon the delivery of a report as aforesaid, any balance appearing therein to the debit of the State or the Development Authority shall be regarded as a debt due from them and payable to Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel. Where the Government requests the Development Administration to carry out operations of reclamation, development or afforestation of land registered in the name of Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel, and Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael notifies the Government, in writing, before carrying out the operation, that it is unable to carry it out at its expense, the State
15.    shall bear the expenditure involved in the operation, and the amount thereof shall be paid to Keren Kayemeth either by a grant, loan or exchange of property or in any other manner, as may be agreed upon between the Government and Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael.
16.    The Board for Land Reclamation and Development attached to Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel shall lay down the development policy in accordance with the agricultural development scheme of the Minister of Agriculture, shall approve the budget proposal of the development Administration, and shall supervise the activities of the Development Administration and the manner in which it carries this Covenant into effect. The number of the members of the Board shall be thirteen; half of them, less one, shall be appointed by the Government. The members of the Board may be replaced in the same way as they were appointed. The Board shall be headed by the Chairman of the Board of Directors of Keren Kayemeth Le’Iisrael or a person appointed in that behalf by Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael.
17.    Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel shall continue to operate, as an independent agency of the World Zionist Organization, among the Jewish public in Israel and the Diaspora, raising funds for the redemption of land from desolation and conducting informational and Zionist-Israel educational activities; and the Government shall extend assistance to Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel in informational and propaganda activities in Israel and abroad.
18.    This Covenant shall come into force on the day of the coming into force of the Law and shall remain in force for five years. Unless one of the parties to this Covenant, at least six months before the expiration of the five years, announces its intention not to renew it, its validity shall be automatically extended for another five years; and so on indefinitely from five-year-period to five-year-period.
19.    If the Law is repealed or amended, Keren Kayemeth Le’lsrael may withdraw from this Covenant by giving notice of withdrawal, in writing, to the Government; however, Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel may not withdraw from this Covenant if the Government notified it in advance, in writing, of the proposed amendment or repeal, and Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel did not express opposition.
20.    If this Covenant becomes void, whether by virtue of clause 17 or by virtue of clause 18, the position which existed immediately before the coming into force of the Law shall be restored; the Government undertakes to propose the necessary legislation to the Knesset.
21.    If one of the parties to this Covenant considers that a change should be made therein, it shall give written notice to the other party, which shall reply to the proposal, favourably or unfavourably, within six months from the day on which notice is given. If the reply is favourable, the Covenant shall be deemed amended, in accordance with the proposal received from the day on which the reply is given.
22.    From the day of the signing of this Covenant, the parties thereto shall do everything necessary and expedient for the implementation thereof and shall be bound by it in all respects.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF THERE HAVE HEREUNTO SET THEIR SIGNATURES, in behalf of the State of Israel, the Minister of Finance, Mr. Levi Eshkol, and on behalf of Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel, the Chairman of the Board of Directors thereof, Mr. Jacob Tsur, in Jerusalem, this 20th day of Kislev, 5722 (28th November, 1961).
 
LEVI ESHKOL
Minister of Finance
 
JACOB TSUR
Chairman of the Board of Directors
of Keren Kayemeth Le’Israel
* The text of this translation is not binding, the only authentic text being the Hebrew original.
 

 

World Jewish body acting for the State of Israel in China

Alan Montague
Jewish Chronicle (UK)
28 Oct. 1991

China-Israel relations are thawing as Peking admits UN resolution [on Zionism] was wrong

Jewish-Chinese relations have received a major boost following the first-ever meeting in Peking between a communal leader and a top Chinese government official.

Mr Qian Qichen, Chin Foreign Minister, last week gave a 45-minute audience to mr Isi Leibler, co-chairman of the World Jewish Congress, at which he indicated that China was moving towards full diplomatic relations with Isarel.

He added that China would like to assist in the Middle East peace process. Previously the country has followed a pro-PLO policy.

In what Mr Leibler described as “open and frank? talks, Mr Qichen also dissociated China from the 1975 United Nations resolution equating Zionism with racism, a resolution the Chinese had co-sponsored.

“It was plain to us that China now regards the wording of the resolution as a gross distortion and a slanderous slur on the Jewish people,” Mr Leibler said.

“Mr Qichen gave a clear admission of embarrassment at being associated with the resolution. He implied that, if the matter was raised at the UN at an appropriate time, China would end that association.”

Mr Leibler added that Mr Qichen had talked with warmth about his acquaintance with former Israeli Foreign Ministers, Mr Shimon Peres and Mr Moshe Arens, and said that last month he had met with Israeli counterpart, Mr David Levy.


At the WJC executive in London on Wednesday, the president Mr Edgar Bronfman said he was meeting Cuban leader Fidel Castro next week to seek his support against the UN resolution.

Chaim Weizmann and the Balfour Declaration

Zionist Leaders- Chaim Weizmann. 11 Oct 1999

http://www.israel.org/MFA/History/Modern%20History/Centenary%20of%20Zionism/Zionist%20Leaders-%20Chaim%20Weizmann

Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs 

Chaim Weizmann was born in 1874, in Motol – a small, isolated shtetl (township) in a bleak, marshy area, forty kilometers from Pinsk. The third of twelve living siblings, Weizmann grew up in a boisterous family, immersed in Jewish tradition. His introduction to science was from a cheder (schoolroom) teacher who surreptitiously taught him some natural science along with his Jewish studies. Weizmann left home at the age of eleven to board in Pinsk and attend high school – a rare step at the time.

At 18, his aptitude for science led him to Germany, where he studied biochemistry at one of Europe’s most prestigious science institutions – the Polytechnic in Berlin. It was in Berlin that he first became involved with Zionist intellectual circles, and became an adherent of the teachings of Ahad Ha’am – a form of “Spiritual Zionism” that held that Palestine should serve as a spiritual center for Jewry. This philosophy was to prompt Weizmann to champion the idea of a Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Later, he became influenced by Theodor Herzl‘s “Political Zionism”, which focused on obtaining an international charter for Jewish settlement in Palestine. Weizmann became an active member, and then a key figure in the Zionist movement – a lifetime career characterized by a complex, and at times stormy, relationship with less moderate Zionists.

In 1901, Weizmann received his doctorate from the University of Fribourg in Switzerland, and began his academic career at the University of Geneva. From this point on, Chaim Weizmann was destined to divide his life between a fruitful scientific career and very intensive Zionist activity.

Weizmann was critical of Herzl’s emphasis on external forms of diplomacy as a means to bring about the realization of Zionism, labeling such efforts “naive and bound to failure.” Zionism could not rest on personal statesmanship of several figures in the courts of Europe alone, he felt, but must be founded on development of cultural, educational and social institutions in the Jewish homeland – the concrete work of state-building. In 1904, he left Geneva for England, where he began a long research career at Manchester University, intermixed with Zionist activism in England. His empirical outlook led Weizmann to espouse a Zionism based on a synthesis of diplomatic and settlement activity. He stressed that even if a charter for settlement in Palestine could be obtained, it would be worthless if it did not rest upon a Jewish society in-the-making, rooted in the soil of Palestine. Although not a socialist himself, Weizmann was a strong supporter of the collective form of settlement (kibbutz).

Weizmann began to cultivate contacts with members of the British government, the “movers and shakers” of the time, to gain empathy for Jewish aspirations for a Return to Zion. His personal diplomacy was characterized by a charming wit and an intuitive ability to state the Zionist cause in terms with which his listener could identify personally – whether English aristocrat or shtetl Jew. Thus, in 1906 when queried about the Zionists’ rejection of the Uganda Plan by a puzzled Lord Balfour, Weizmann – who had opposed temporary settlement of distressed Jews from Eastern Europe in Uganda, a proposal raised at the Sixth Zionist Congress (1903) – asked the British politician “whether he would trade Paris for London,” noting that “Jerusalem had been Jewish when London was still a marshland.”

In 1916 – in the midst of the World War I – Weizmann, who worked as a research chemist at Manchester University, discovered a process for synthesizing acetone, a solvent used in the manufacture of munitions. His contacts in Manchester society and his supervision of mass production of synthetic acetone for the Allies opened doors for him in British government circles, where he continued to serve as an eloquent spokesman for Zionism. Royalties on his acetone patent granted the Jewish scientist financial security and independence – both material comfort and the option to devote himself to Zionism, including presidency of the Zionist movement without remuneration.

Weizmann was a striking figure of a man – a massive bald head, deep piercing eyes, set off by a tidy mustache and goatee – whose presence and eloquence left an enduring impact on others. Lord Balfour commented dryly that “Dr. Weizmann could charm a bird off a tree.”

When Lloyd George, then minister of munitions, was appointed prime minister and Arthur Balfour became foreign secretary, years of persistent persuasion and “sensitization” to Zionism played a decisive role in the decision of Great Britain to issue the Balfour Declaration. A rare constellation of British and Jewish strategic interests, together with personal empathy for Dr. Weizmann and his cause – the fruit of eight years of what today would be considered “networking” – culminated in this document, approved by the British cabinet on November 2, 1917, that proclaimed the sympathy of the British government for Zionist aims in Palestine.

Informing Weizmann of the decision, Lord Mark Sykes, secretary of the war cabinet, declared: “Dr. Weizmann – It’s a boy.” Indeed, the landmark document, which was to lead to the granting of a British Mandate over Palestine by the League of Nation, was a crucial step towards the birth of a Jewish State, and is considered Chaim Weizmann’s most outstanding achievement.

In 1918, Weizmann was appointed head of the Zionist Commission sent by Great Britain to Palestine to advise on the future development of the country. He also attempted to achieve cooperation and peaceful relations with local Arabs who, he felt, would benefit economically from the Zionist enterprise. Weizmann met with the Emir Feisal, then the undisputed leader of awakening Arab nationalism. Feisal promised to recognize Zionist aims in Palestine, as long as the aims of Arab nationalism were achieved in Iraq and Syria. Unfortunately, this agreement was short-lived.

In the same year Weizmann attended the cornerstone-laying ceremony for the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and in 1919 led the Zionist delegation to the Peace Conference in Versailles. His plea for international recognition of the Balfour Declaration was answered: in 1922, the League of Nations granted Great Britain the Mandate for Palestine, in which the historical connection of the Jewish people to Palestine was cited.

In 1920, Weizmann was elected president of the Zionist Organization. He stressed that “a state cannot be created by decree”; Zionist endeavors, he believed, must be based equally on settlement of the land and the powers of science to build a “new Jewish society.” In 1924, Weizmann thoroughly irritated Polish Zionists when he proclaimed “we don’t want to build our National Home according to the model of Dezika and Neleviki (Jewish commercial districts in Warsaw), yet he was greatly admired, even adored, by the Jewish masses as an eloquent spokesman of their aspirations.

During the next two decades Weizmann succeeded in broadening support for the Zionist movement to encompass non-Zionists, mobilizing Jewish capital in the west to further rural Jewish settlement though the establishment of Keren Hayesod – the financial arm of the Zionist movement. His leadership of the Zionist movement was subsequently challenged both by American Zionists, who questioned the necessity of concerted Jewish settlement and development to give the Balfour Declaration meaning – and later by the Revisionist wing of Zionism, who opposed his moderate policies towards Great Britain; still, his Zionist program bonding “diplomacy and settlement activity” remained the approach of mainstream Zionism and its institutions as a whole.

Continuing his scientific work, Weizmann laid the foundations of the Daniel Sieff Institute in Rehovot in the early 1930s – today, the renowned Weizmann Institute of Science. In 1937, Weizmann settled in Rehovot, continuing to speak for the Zionist cause worldwide, although he was overshadowed by those who opposed his moderate, pro-British policies.

Despite changes in British policy in the wake of Arab riots in 1921, 1929, and 1936-39, which culminated in the 1939 British White Paper that severely restricted Jewish immigration and land purchase, Weizmann believed alienation of British support would be a strategic mistake and would undermine Zionist interests; changing British policy must be based on persuasion, not confrontation. Speaking before the British Peel Commission in 1937, Weizmann said: “There are in this part of the world [Europe] 6,000,000 people … for whom the world is divided into places where they cannot live and places where they cannot enter.” The message was clear. However, British policy remained unchanged, with tragic ramifications. At the end of the Second World War, the horrifying dimensions of the tragedy that had befallen European Jewry became evident; and still the British were not ready to admit Jewish refugees into Palestine.

Weizmann’s espousement of “gradualism” was symbolically epitomized in an incident at Kibbutz Hulda. Appearing hours after his scheduled arrival, the Zionist leader explained his tardiness – “The Zionist wagon rolls slowly.” In 1946, at age 72, Weizmann received a vote of no-confidence at the post-war Zionist Congress. In deference to his stature, the President’s chair was not filled. More militant Zionist leaders, led by David Ben-Gurion, ready for a confrontation with Great Britain, assumed the dominant role in Zionist affairs.

Weizmann, however, continued to play a crucial role in removing the remaining barriers along the road to statehood. In 1947, when the British brought the problem of Palestine before the United Nations, he addressed the General Assembly, calling upon the delegates to bear in mind their “historic mission”; in addition, intense behind-the-scenes lobbying – including that of Dr. Weizmann – was a decisive factor in the General Assembly’s decision to include the Negev in the territory designated to become the Jewish state under the UN partition resolution. The resolution was passed on 29 November 1947, by a vote of 33 to 13, with ten abstentions.

The State of Israel was proclaimed on May 14, 1948, the day before the British Mandate was due to end. Its recognition by the US was partly due to the intervention of Dr. Weizmann, who met with President Truman under trying and fateful circumstances in March 1948. At the time, Truman was entertaining second thoughts and considering postponing partition in light of hostilities. At the urging of his former business partner and personal friend, a Jew, who compared his adoration of the Zionist leader to Truman’s own respect for Andrew Jackson, he agreed to receive Weizmann. Shortly after the State of Israel was declared, the United States announced its recognition of the new state.

In February 1949 – a month after Israel’s first elections – a special session of the Knesset in Jerusalem elected Chaim Weizmann as the first president of the State of Israel. The appointment was an act of gratitude in recognition of Weizmann’s outstanding contribution to the birth of the State of Israel. Still, he resented the limitations of this office, which was mostly ceremonial.

Chaim Weizmann died in 1952 in Rehovot and was buried there, near the campus of the Institute of Science which bears his name.

 

 

Jewish Colonial Trust

Jewish Colonial Trust

The first Zionist bank, it was founded at the Second Zionist Congress and incorporated in London in 1899. The JCT was intended to be the financial instrument of the Zionist Organization, and was to obtain capital and credit to help attain a charter for Palestine.

It quickly became clear that the amount of capital raised by the JCT was far from sufficient to attain this goal; the sum raised was only

Canadian Zionists commemorate Yitzhak Rabin

 

[Yitzhak Rabin is among the foremost Israeli war criminals (see Memorandum) Among his exploits are orders to expel the inhabitants of the Arab village Emwas.   On the ruins of this village a park was planted with funds from the Canadian Zionist Federation, and was named Canada Park.] 

THE RABIN MEMORIAL 2004

October 26, 2004
Eastern Region of the Canadian Zionist Federation is scheduled to hold the Rabin Memorial on Tuesday, October 26, 2004 at 8:00 p.m. The Memorial is a community-wide program and will be held at the Oscar Peterson Hall, a concert hall affiliated with Concordia University.

This event, in commemoration of the 9th anniversary of the death of the late Yitzhak Rabin will feature a wonderful children’s orchestra, a well-known community member as the guest speaker, and a candle-lighting ceremony.

Mr. Marc Attali, Consul General of Israel in Montreal will be actively participating, and special invitations will be sent to dignitaries in both the Jewish and non-Jewish community.  An attendance of 600 people  is expected  for this year’s annual Rabin Memorial ceremony.

The Zionist Congress

THE ZIONIST CONGRESS

Source: http://www.wzo.org.il/doingzionism/institutions/zionist_congress.asp  (March 2005)

The Zionist Congress is the supreme institution of the World Zionist Organization and its highest legislative authority. Article 13 of the WZO Constitution stipulates: "An Ordinary Congress shall meet at least once in four years at a place and time determined by the Council. It shall be convened by the Executive." Notwithstanding, the Constitution allows postponement of the Congress for special reasons, and subject to a decision of the Zionist General Council upon hearing from the Executive. The decision must be passed by 75% of the members of the ZGC but can be contested in the Zionist Supreme Court.

Powers of the Congress

  • The Congress elects the Chairman of the Zionist Executive, the Treasurer, the members of the Executive, the members of the Zionist General Council and their deputies, the President of the Zionist Supreme Court, the Attorney of the World Zionist Organization and the Comptroller.

  • The Congress receives and considers the reports of the Zionist Executive and of the Institutions of the World Zionist Organization.

  • The Congress receives and decides on the report of the Comptroller.

  • The Congress considers, in its committees, proposals brought before the Congress by the Congress delegates of the Zionist General Council, the members of the Congress Presidium, the Zionist Executive and the Zionist Federations. The conclusions of the committees are put to the vote in the plenary of the Congress.

  • The Congress draws up the policy of the World Zionist Organization including the financial policy.

In the inter-Congress period many of the Congress powers are assumed by the Zionist General Council, including the authority to amend the Constitution.

Composition of the Congress

In pursuance of Article 17, Section 1 of the WZO Constitution, the number of delegates to Congress, apart from those elected on World Election Lists and those representing International Bodies, will not exceed 500. In pursuance of Section 2 of the same Article, the Zionist General Council may resolve, not later than one year before Congress meets, to increase this number by not more than 5%. In pursuance of Section 3, the number of delegates to Congress will be allocated in the following proportion: Israel 38%, United States of America 29%, other countries of the Diaspora 33%.

In the case of countries of the Diaspora, an overall number is given, but the number of delegates from each country is determined, prior to each Congress, by a special Committee, which takes into account in its decisions, inter alia, the size of the Jewish population and all the Zionist achievements in each country, such as the number of Federation members, Aliyah, Appeals and Jewish education.

(At the 34th Congress in addition to the 500 delegates there were an additional 32 delegates, with full voting rights, from the FSU according to the decision of the Zionist General Council from 2001 resolution 47.)

Membership of Organizations in the World Zionist Organization

Since the new WZO Constitution came into force in 1960, there has been no personal membership in the World Zionist Organization. Only organizations can be members. An individual Zionist can belong to the World Zionist Organization only indirectly, through one of the member organizations.

The Central Elections Board

The Chairman of the Central Elections Board and the members of the Board are appointed by the President of the Zionist Supreme Court. The Board is chaired by a judge or judge emeritus in Israel. Factions which participated in the previous Zionist Congress participate in the Board as observers.

The Area Election Committee

The Area Election Committee determines the method of elections and conduct of the elections in each area/country where there is a Zionist Federation, which is a member of the Zionist Organization.

Elections to the Congress must be held no later than three months prior to the Congress.

The Zionist World Unions

"Zionist World Union" means a Zionist organization, which represents a special ideological point of view within the World Zionist Organization, has branches in at least 5 countries and is represented by a Congress Grouping.

The Zionist World Unions are:

  • The Labor Zionist Movement

  • World Likud

  • Arzenu – The Zionist faction of the Reform Movement

  • Meretz

  • Mizrachi / Gesher / Meimad

  • MERCAZ – The Zionist faction of the Conservative Movement

  • Mercaz – Hanoar HaZioni

  • The World Confederation of United Zionists, which in the USA is a federation of "Hadassah", the American Jewish League and Bnei Zion

  • Israel b’Aliyah

  • Herut / Mercaz Party

  • World Union Israel Beitanu, Moledet, Tekuma

The International Jewish Organizations

Since the Twenty-Eighth Zionist Congress (1972), the international Jewish organizations are represented in the Zionist Congress, provided that they accept the Jerusalem Program, even if not all their members are declared Zionist (unlike the World Unions in which every member must be a declared Zionist). These bodies have limited voting rights – they do not vote on matters of candidature and elections to the institutions of the WZO.

The International Jewish Organizations are:

  • World Emunah

  • The World Sephardi Federation

  • B’nai B’rith International

  • Maccabi World Union

  • The World Conference of Synagogues and Kehiloth (Orthodox)

  • The World Council of Synagogues (Conservative)

  • The World Union for Progressive Judaism (Reform)

The student representatives and the representatives of the Zionist Council in Israel have the same status as representatives of the international Jewish organizations.

Zionist Organizations with Special Status

There are two women’s organizations which have special status in the Zionist Organization:

  • WIZO – is an international, non-party Zionist body, which receives by virtue of an agreement entered into in 1964, global representation. WIZO has full voting rights like the World Unions.

  • Hadassah – received special status by virtue of a decision of the Zionist General Council in 1994. Hadassah has full voting rights

The above mentioned bodies make up the Zionist Congress

 

Participants in Congress in an Advisory Capacity and Observers

In addition to the delegates with full voting rights participating in Congress, there are also participants in an advisory capacity only. These participants are entitled to participate in debates but have no voting rights.

These delegates are divided into two groups:

  1. Certain office holders, for instance members of the Executive, members of the Zionist General Council who were not elected as delegates to Congress, Chairs of the Zionist Federations, judicial office holders – the President of the Zionist Supreme Court, the Attorney, the Comptroller and representatives of the Aliyah Movement.

  2. The Executive or the Congress Presidium may invite "personalities and representatives of bodies whose presence at Congress, in the view of the Executive or the Presidium is necessary or desirable" (Regulation 7A of the Standing Orders of the Zionist Congress) as observers with no speaking or voting rights.

The Course of the Congress

The Congress is conducted by the Congress Presidium. The Congress deliberations are divided into five stages:

  1. Opening of the Congress, including a speech by the Chairman of the Executive, and other speeches determined in the agenda, election of the Congress Presidium, the report of the President of the Zionist Supreme Court on the election results, reports of the members of the Executive to complete the printed report, election of the Congress committees.

  2. Election of the new Executive, according to the proposal of the Congress Standing Committee.

  3. Meetings of the committees

  4. Reports of the committees and voting on the draft resolutions presented by them. The report of the Standing Committee and voting on its proposals for members of the Zionist General Council, the Comptroller and the Legal Institutions.

  5. Congress closing ceremony

Resolutions Of the Zionist General Council 2004

Resolutions Of the Zionist General Council 2004


XXXIV/3

Jerusalem ? 15th to 17th June, 2004,  26 ? 28th Sivan, 5764

[Excerpts]

A. Changes to the Constitution


1. The Jerusalem Program
Zionism, the national liberation movement of the Jewish people, brought about the establishment of the State of Israel, and views a Jewish, Zionist, democratic and secure State of Israel to be the expression of the common responsibility of the Jewish people for its continuity and future.

The foundations of Zionism are:

1.  The unity of the Jewish people, its bond to its historic homeland Eretz Yisrael, and the centrality of the State of Israel and Jerusalem, its capital, in the life of the nation;

2.  Aliyah from all countries and the effective integration of all immigrants into Israeli Society.

3.  Strengthening Israel as a Jewish, Zionist and democratic state and shaping it as an exemplary society with a unique moral and spiritual character, marked by mutual respect for the multi-faceted Jewish people, rooted in the vision of the prophets, striving for peace and contributing to the betterment of the world.

4.  Ensuring the future and the distinctiveness of the Jewish people by furthering Jewish, Hebrew and Zionist education, fostering spiritual and cultural values and teaching Hebrew as the national language;

5.  Nurturing mutual Jewish responsibility, defending the rights of Jews as individuals and as a nation, representing the national Zionist interests of the Jewish people, and struggling against all manifestations of anti-Semitism;

 6. Settling the country as an expression of practical Zionism.

[…]

B. The Goals of the Zionist Movement


5. Objectives of the WZO and the Role of the Zionist Federations in Their Fulfillment

Whereas     the Zionist Federations constitute the primary arm of the World Zionist Organization in achieving its objectives throughout the world, and

Whereas     the 34th Zionist Congress passed resolution #43 mandating
"that the Zionist Executive and the Presidium of the Zionist General Council establish a high-level Committee on the Status of the Zionist Federations with the participation of representatives of the Zionist Federations and with advice from other bodies, to explore the status of the Zionist Federations around the world, and develop an operative plan, including budgetary considerations, to raise their stature within Jewish communal life," and

Whereas     the 34th Zionist Congress furthermore passed resolution #41, calling upon "the Zionist Executive to provide the necessary funding, beginning from January 1, 2002, to the Zionist Federations in order to better develop an organizational infrastructure that will operate more efficiently and will carry out Zionist and educational activities and projects, in accordance with the Jerusalem Program," and

Whereas         the 34th Zionist Congress furthermore passed resolution #40, which mandated that the WZO Executive "provide a plan for the creation of territorial groupings alongside the ideological ones, to allow Zionist Federations to take their rightful place within the structure of the WZO. Said plan to be submitted to the first meeting of the Zionist General Council in 2003," and

Whereas     no action has been taken regarding the implementation of Resolutions #40, #41, and #43 in any of these areas,

Be it hereby resolved that the Zionist Executive and the Presidium jointly facilitate the appointment by July 31, 2004, of a Task Force on the Status of the Zionist Federations, which will include among its members at least three heads of Zionist Federations. The said committee shall issue a report on it its findings and recommendations no later than four months after its establishment.

6. The elected representatives? obligation to Zionist General Council policy

The Zionist General Council resolves that all issues related to the Jewish Agency will be deliberated and agreed upon in advance within the appropriate institutions of the World Zionist Organization ? the Zionist Executive, the Zionist General Council and the Presidium of the Zionist General Council.

This resolution is binding for all elected representatives of the World Zionist Organization.

(*)  Everything stated in this resolution proposal regarding elected office holders or position holders refers equally to men and women.

7. Elections in Israel

Whereas    The delegates to the Zionist Congress in Israel are determined in
     accordance with the results of the Knesset elections of the
     Zionist political parties;

And whereas    As a result of this process most Israeli citizens are detached from
     the values, goals and activities of the Zionist movement;

And whereas     Democratic elections are held for the World Zionist Congress in
     all countries other than Israel;

It is hereby resolved:

A joint committee of the Zionist Executive and the Presidium of the Zionist General Council will be formed to deliberate on, study and prepare a detailed proposal. The committee will submit its proposals for deliberation at the next meeting of the Zionist General Council.

8. Membership Campaign

Whereas the World Zionist Organization is a global movement of the Jewish People dedicated to strengthening the bonds of peoplehood between Jews worldwide based on our shared culture, heritage and traditions; our common language and our homeland Israel; and
 
 Whereas for many decades the WZO was strengthened by the broadbased popular involvement of individuals in the active life of the Zionist movement;
 
It is hereby decided that: The Zionist General Council of the WZO deems it a high priority to reinvigorate the connection of individual Zionists worldwide with the aims and objectives of the World Zionist Movement.

9. Status of the World Zionist Organization

The World Zionist Organization derives its authority from its historical role in the struggle to establish the State of Israel.  This role was recognized in the status law and covenant between the Israeli government and the World Zionist Organization, and in the agreements between representatives of the communities and the federations, and the World Zionist Organization, which constitute the Jewish Agencx’s framework agreements. 

And whereas    the World Zionist Organization believes that its status,
     authority and activity have been greatly impaired,

It is proposed that any additional changes to the existing agreements be deliberated in the World Zionist Organization before they become binding on the parties.

A think tank should be formed, to include experts from the academic world, which will initiate and lead an open, broad-based dialogue within the Jewish people, with emphasis on understanding complex contemporary realities.

C. Aliyah


10. Aliyah from all Countries

The 34th / 3 Zionist General Council has determined that in the 56th year of the State of Israel ? the sovereign Jewish state founded in our historical homeland on the principles of the Zionist vision ? the Zionist movement shall be committed to furthering the Zionist enterprise and working toward its realization, through the ingathering of exiles, the social, cultural, spiritual and economic absorption of immigrants, and the settling of immigrants in their homeland.

The Zionist General Council resolves to charge a joint committee of the Presidium of the Zionist General Council and the Zionist Executive to prepare a joint operating program with the Jewish Agency for Israel, making aliya in general, and aliya from Western countries in particular, the top priority for all branches of the Zionist movement.

11. Encouraging Aliyah from all Countries

The 34th Zionist General Council reaffirms that aliyah to Israel and immigrant absorption and settlement are among the highest priorities of the contemporary Zionist movement.

The Zionist General Council resolves to begin intensive activity aimed at encouraging, cultivating and assisting organizations, associations and institutions that are directly engaged in encouraging and organizing aliyah in general, and from Western countries in particular. 

D. Jewish Zionist Education


12. The Centenary of the Death of Dr Binyamin Zeev Herzl

The 34th /3 Zionist General Council resolves to charge the Zionist Executive and its representatives in the national institutions with the development of a public relations campaign in honor of the 100th anniversary of the death of Dr. Binyamin Ze’ev Herzl.  In this campaign, Israeli flags will be placed in Jewish schools and educational institutions in the Diaspora.

The Zionist General Council calls for educational hasbara on the subject of the national flag and the State of Israel’s national symbol, the menorah in writing and through other electronic means.

13. Hebrew Language

The 34th  /3 Zionist General Council views the strengthening of Jewish-Zionist education as the basis for inculcation and practical realization of Zionist ideology.

The Zionist General Council thus resolves that 5764-5765 (2004-2005), the 100th anniversary of the death of Dr. Binyamin Ze’ev Herzl z?l(1860-1904), the visionary of Zionism, shall be declared to be the year of Jewish-Zionist education and the year of the Hebrew language.

The Zionist General Council charges the Zionist Executive and its representatives in the Jewish Agency and in all of the national institutions with making Jewish-Zionist education, the teaching of Hebrew, and the centrality of the State of Israel in the educational experience as high priorities for the Zionist youth movements, schools and educational institutions throughout the Diaspora.

The Zionist General Council resolves to charge the Zionist Executive with re-establishing Hebrew language ulpanim, through the Zionist federations, in cooperation with the communal and educational leadership in each locality.

14. Involvement in Israeli Society

Whereas the nature of Israeli society, and the integration of olim into it, are major concerns of the Zionist movement, and

Whereas the 34th Zionist Congress passed a number of resolutions regarding these areas (#2 – #4, #71-#81), and

Whereas the World Zionist Organization currently has no mechanism for furthering the objectives of the above-noted resolutions, including those dealing with legislation in the Knesset,

Be it hereby resolved that the Zionist Executive and the Presidium of the ZGC jointly establish a Standing Committee on the Nature of Israeli Society that will, among other things, serve as the official lobby of the WZO regarding such matters specified in the above-noted resolutions, including the preservation of Israel as a Jewish Democratic State. 

15. Fulfillment of the Zionist Congress resolution on youth and students

The Zionist General Council is distressed by the rate at which Zionist Congress resolutions are being implemented, and calls upon the Zionist Executive to immediately implement Resolution No. 67 of the 34th Zionist Congress, referred to as “Youth and Students?:

And whereas    The Zionist Congress resolved to “place youth and students at the head of the World Zionist Organization agenda”?

The Congress issued guidelines for the implementation of these resolutions in its instruction in Article 67A, B and C.

A- The Zionist Executive shall implement the resolutions of the 33rd Zionist Congress relating to the “Hagshama and Young Generation Department,” youth movements and young people (including students),

B- The Zionist Executive shall give full backing and provide the resources necessary for the “Hagshama and Young Generation Department? to conduct and even to expand its activities,

C- The Zionist Executive shall make funds available to the Hagshama Department for the establishment of courses in Hadracha and Hasbara for students participating in any program (either religious or secular, and longer than one semester) in Israel, and for seminars in Jewish and Hebrew schools and for youth movement counselors in the Diaspora as well.

Consequently, the Zionist General Council must ensure that the Zionist Executive implements these instructions.

E. Budget


16.
The 34th Zionist General Council resolves to reinstate the “Zionist shekel? as a source of budgetary funding.

The Zionist General Council charges a joint committee of the Presidium of the Zionist General Council and the Zionist Executive to submit, within three months, an operative plan detailing the means of purchasing “Zionist shekels” by individuals, groups, organizations and institutions.

The 34th Zionist General Council resolves to reinstate the “Zionist shekel? as a source of funding for special projects intended to promote Jewish-Zionist education and to settle new immigrant garinim.

The Zionist General Council charges a joint committee of the Presidium of the Zionist General Council and the Zionist Executive to submit, within three months, an operative plan detailing the means of purchasing “Zionist shekels” by individuals, groups, organizations and institutions, and the criteria for use of the "shekel" funds for special projects of the Zionist Movement.

17. The State of Israel ? agreement between the State of Israel and the World Zionist Organization

Whereas    The State of Israel was established at the initiative of the Zionist
     institutions; and

whereas    The World Zionist Organization is currently responsible for activity
     and relations with Diaspora Jewry, based on the Status Law and
     Covenant signed by the State of Israel, and the World Zionist
     Organization and the Jewish Agency;

It is hereby resolved:
The Zionist General Council calls for the formation of a team within the Zionist Executive, based on the existing balance of power within the Zionist Congress, to negotiate with the State of Israel for its support for the World Zionist Organization’s budget and its Diaspora activities.
 

18. Property of the World Zionist Organization

Whereas    Property acquired up to 1971 in the name of the World Zionist
     Organization or the Jewish Agency is World Zionist Organization
     property;  and,

whereas    Property acquired by Keren Hayesod up to 1989 in the name of Keren
     Hayesod is also property of the World Zionist Organization;   and,

whereas    Keren Hayesod’s charter, up to the time of its amendment, recognized
     the World Zionist Organization as Keren Hayesod’s controlling party; 
     and,

whereas     The Jewish Agencx’s 1971 restructuring agreement recognizes that
     the World Zionist Organization acted as the Jewish Agency;  and,
whereas    The covenant between the State of Israel and the World Zionist
     Organization, based on the World Zionist Organization
      Status Law, recognizes that the World Zionist Organization until 1971
     was also referred to as the Jewish Agency, and recognizes that Keren
     Hayesod and the Jewish National Fund are funds belonging to the
     World Zionist Organization until today;

It is hereby resolved:
Any sale or transfer of real estate belonging to the World Zionist Organization to any other party must be approved by the Zionist Executive.

Properties acquired by the World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency up to 1971 are the property of the World Zionist Organization, and properties acquired by Keren Hayesod up to 1989 are the property of the World Zionist Organization.

Any party other than the World Zionist Organization making use of WZO property for its own purposes and not for purposes of the World Zionist Organization shall be required to compensate the World Zionist Organization for an identical and index-linked sum.

Accurate and up-to-date information regarding the properties and their ownership shall be compiled by an external professional committee and brought up for deliberation before the permanent Budget and Finance Committee, which shall submit its recommendations for discussion and approval of the XXXIV/4 Zionist General Council.

F. The Struggle against Anti-Semitism


19. The Struggle of the Zionist Federations Against Anti-Semitism

The spread of anti-Semitism in its new and old forms was addressed by Dr. Binyamin Ze’ev Herzl in his book The Jewish State: “The very impossibility of getting at the Jews nourishes and embitters hatred of them.  Anti-Semitism increases day by day and hour by hour [?]? The founding of the State of Israel in Eretz Yisrael proved that the Jewish people cannot be vanquished.

The Zionist General Council resolves to charge the Zionist federations, in conjunction with the Jewish organizations, institutions and communities, with undertaking a world-wide campaign against anti-Semitism, and with allocating special resources for educational and public relations activity aimed at fighting anti-Semitism.

20. The Struggle Against anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism ? the World Zionist Federations as the Spearhead in the Battle against World Anti-Semitism

Whereas    The Jewish Diaspora is the arena of anti-Semitic and anti-Zionist activity; and

Whereas    Jewish and private institutions are the targets of violence on the part of various anti-Semitic groups; and

Whereas    We, as the World Zionist Organization and as a Zionist, Jewish and democratic state, have a sense of responsibility and commitment toward the Jewish people in the Diaspora;

It is hereby resolved:

The Zionist General Council views the battle against incidents of anti-Semitism as a primary function of all Zionist federations.

The Zionist General Council calls upon the Zionist Executive to allocate to the Zionist federations the necessary resources from the World Zionist Organization budget, and from other sources, according to its executive decision.

The World Zionist Organization and the Zionist federations shall act, together with the State of Israel and other Jewish organizations active in the various countries, to fight against manifestations of racism, anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism, on behalf of the security of Jews wherever they may be.

21. Anti-Semitism

Whereas    The plague of anti-Semitism in its various forms includes synagogue burnings and the desecration of graves in Jewish cemeteries around the world;

The 34th Zionist General Council hereby resolves to charge the Presidium of the Zionist General Council with forming a sub-committee to address the following issues:

A. Collection and dissemination of up-to-date information on damage to synagogues and cemeteries;

B. Creation of channels of communication with the Diaspora communities, in order to stand by them and to demonstrate solidarity;

C. Consideration of the possibility of a volunteer organization to rehabilitate the desecrated graves;

22.

Members of the Zionist General Council, gathered together for the world meeting of the World Zionist Organization in Jerusalem, June 2004.

Whereas    Collective memory and the search for justice are historical values that have been preserved by the Jewish people over the thousands of years of its existence; and
Whereas    The World Zionist Organization’s mission is to ensure the security of Jews around the world; and

Whereas    The terrorist attacks on the Israeli embassy in Argentina and on the Buenos Aires Jewish community center constituted major attacks against the Jewish people in the Diaspora; and

Whereas    12 years have passed since the attack on the embassy and 10years since the AMIA attack, and the Argentinean justice authorities have thus far failed in their investigation of the incidents and in apprehending the parties responsible for them locally and abroad; and

Whereas    Despite strong suspicions and existing facts, no determinations of responsibility have been made, whether at the local or the international levels, regarding persons, political organizations, terrorists and countries; and

Whereas    There are suspicions of complicity and/or hampering of the investigation on the part of certain sectors of the Argentinean republic, with no results leading to the identification of perpetrators,

It is hereby resolved to call upon the Zionist Executive:

1 To add the 18th of July (the date of the attack on the Jewish community in Buenos Aires) to the Zionist calendar each year, as a day of public relations activity against anti-Semitism, and in remembrance of the victims of the attacks.

2- To dedicate this date to activity around the world to mark the terror attacks under the slogan, “Justice, justice you shall seek.”

3- To demand that both terrorist attacks be properly investigated, and that those responsible for them be arrested and brought to justice.

[…]

The Zionist General Council

THE ZIONIST GENERAL COUNCIL

The Zionist General Council is the supreme institution of the Zionist movement in the inter-Congress period. The Zionist General Council has all the powers of the Congress except for those expressly reserved for the Congress.

The Zionist General Council overseas and, in so far as necessary, decides upon the manner in which the Executive will implement the decisions of the Congress and of the Council. The Zionist General Council receives and considers the reports of the Executive.

The Zionist Council, upon proposal of the Executive, either itself or through the Permanent Committee for Budget and Finance, decides upon all budgetary and financial matters, provided such a decision is not inconsistent with the decisions of Congress.

Should the position of a member of the Executive, a member of the Presidium or a deputy member of the Presidium fall vacant for any reason whatsoever in the inter-Congress period, the Zionist General Council elects a new member in his stead. This election is carried out at the next Session of the Zionist General Council or in the inter-Session period by mail/fax. The decision on such a vote is taken by the Presidium, in consultation with the Executive. The vote is valid if at least 50% of the Zionist General Council with voting rights participate.

Composition of the Zionist General Council

In pursuance of Article 32 Section 1 of the Constitution, the Congress elects the members of the Council entitled to vote in accordance with the relative strength of the Groupings in Congress. Every Congress Grouping is represented on the Council by a number of members equal to one-fifth of the total number of delegates of the respective Grouping. A remainder of at least three as a result of such division entitles a Grouping to an additional member on the Council.

The composition of the Zionist General Council elected at the Thirty-Fourth Zionist Congress is as follows:

Representatives of the World Unions and Zionist Organizations

117 members

Labour Zionist Movement ? Meretz  

27 members

Arzenu, Hamercaz-Hanoar Hazioni, Shinui

20 members

Likud  

18 member

Mizrachi, Gesher, Meimad

16 members

Confederation

6 members

MERCAZ

9 members

Herut

 4 members

Israel Beitainu, Moledet Tekumah

4 members

WIZO

6 members

Hadassah

7 members



Representatives of the International Jewish Organizations

51 members

World Sephardi Federation       

8 members

B?nai B?rith International

8 members

Maccabi World Union

5 members

Students Delegation

5 members

World Emunah

5 members

The Zionist Council in Israel    

5 members

World Conference of Synagogues and Kehiloth (Orthodox)

5 members

World Council of Synagogues (Conservative)    

5 members

World Union for Progressive Judaism (Reform)  

5 members

19 Chairs of Zionist Federations of countries, which were represented at the foregoing Congress by 3 or more delegates are also members of the Zionist General Council with the same status as the members representing international Jewish organizations.

The Zionist Congress elects deputy members of the Council equal to twice the number of members.

The total number of Zionist General Council members is 187. 

JNF not required to act for good of all, court told

JNF not required to act for good of all, court told

By Yuval Yoaz


Haaretz
17 December 2004

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/515073.html

The Jewish National Fund (JNF) is not required to act for the good
of all of Israel’s citizens and asking it to allocate land for the
benefit of everyone is tantamount to nationalizing its assets,
according to a document submitted to the High Court of Justice this
week.

The document was submitted by the JNF in response to a petition
brought against the Israel Lands Administration (ILA) about two
months ago by the Arab Center for Alternative Planning, the
Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI) and the Adalah legal
center.

The petitioners are asking the court to annul an ILA policy that
prevents Arabs from participating in bids to purchase land owned by
the JNF. The petitioners say the policy is not in keeping with the
Basic Law on Human Dignity and Liberty.

About five years ago, the High Court set a precedent when it ruled
in favor of Adel Kaadan, who wanted to buy a lot in the community of
Katzir, which was built on state land allocated to the Jewish
Agency. A panel of five justices, led by Court President Aharon
Barak, ruled that "the state’s obligation to act with equality
extends to all of its activities. It therefore also extends to the
allocation of state lands."

ACRI attorney Ouni Bana argued before the court that the Kaadan
ruling set a general rule, by which the state must not transfer the
use or ownership of land to a third party that contracts with Jews
only with regard to public land resources.

However, the JNF argued that its right to act as the "trustee of the
Jewish people" surpasses even the principle of equality. "The JNF of
course recognizes the right of all citizens to equality," the
document submitted to the court states. "However, equality does not
extend to the right of one person to settle on another person’s
property."

The JNF currently has lands amounting to about 2.5 million dunams.
The document, to which an affidavit by JNF chairman Yehiel Leket was
appended, also noted that it is not funded by the government, that
its assets were acquired through the contributions of tens of
thousands of Jews throughout the Diaspora, and therefore "the JNF
has a clear obligation to its donors" and was established to work
for the good of the Jewish people only.

JNF lawyers argued that JNF ownership of land is completely separate
from the state, according to the Basic Law on the People’s Lands,
"which authorized separate and independent ownership of JNF lands."

In response to the JNF, the petitioners’ attorneys argued that the
prohibition against discrimination applies to private organizations,
as well as public authorities. In any case, they added, because the
JNF carries out government functions, it cannot be seen as a private
organization. The petitioners also noted that their petition was
directed against a undisputedly public body, the Israel Lands
Administration, which administers JNF lands and must market them
equally to all citizens.

Truth – Justice – Peace